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10/22/14 - Last night was the Sawbill crew's annual pilgrimage to the Silver Bowl in Silver Bay, Minnesota for a night of pizza, beer and bowling.

Sawbill Newsletter - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 10:18am

10/22/14 - Last night was the Sawbill crew's annual pilgrimage to the Silver Bowl in Silver Bay, Minnesota for a night of pizza, beer and bowling. - Bill


Bowling nicknames: (l-r front) Bilbo, TC, NilsJohn, (l-r back) Puckerman, Hammypops, Cindy Lou Who, Mongo, Carlita.


Hammypops demonstrates proper form.


Mongo's patient mate, Mary Henry, who lives nearby, was kind enough to join us and share her score-keeping skills.


One of the many amenities at the Silver Bowl are the black lights that make an already challenging sport even more challenging.


TC is carefully watched by the owner's baby.


We didn't catch the baby's name, but she's obviously very comfortable in a bowling alley.

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Recipe of the Week: It’s SOUP Time!

Aging Youthful - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 1:00am

This recipe comes from the Paleo Grubs website under their “100 Best Paleo Recipes“. My mouth is watering just thinking about it! I have just started to crave soups as the weather has cooled off a bit here in FL (I KNOW…it is Florida and the daytime temps are still in the 80′s…but it’s NOT at night!). I LOVE a good tortilla soup, and since I’m not a fan of beans to begin with, this recipe from Linda’ Wagner’s blog fits the bill! If you are true Paleo, leave out the tortilla strips too!

Paleo Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe

This healthy version of Chicken Tortilla Soup will knock your socks off! You
don’t need to add cheese or tortilla strips the soup is full of flavor on it’s
own!
Author: Linda Wagner
Cuisine: Mexican
Serves: 6
Ingredients
2 large chicken breasts, skin removed and cut into ½ inch strips
1 28oz can of diced tomatoes
32 ounces organic chicken broth
1 sweet onion, diced
2 jalepenos, de-seeded and diced
2 cups of shredded carrots
2 cups chopped celery
1 bunch of cilantro chopped fine
4 cloves of garlic, minced – I always use one of these
2 Tbs tomato paste
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp cumin
sea salt & fresh cracked pepper to taste
olive oil
1-2 cups water
Instructions
1. In a crockpot or large dutch oven over med-high heat, place a dash of olive oil and about ¼ cup chicken
broth. Add onions, garlic, jalapeno, sea salt and pepper and cook until soft, adding more broth as needed.
2. Then add all of your remaining ingredients and enough water to fill to the top of your pot. Cover and let
cook on low for about 2 hrs, adjusting salt & pepper as needed.
3. Once the chicken is fully cooked, you should be able to shred it very easily. I simply used the back of a
wooden spoon and pressed the cooked chicken against the side of the pot. You could also use a fork or
tongs to break the chicken apart and into shreds.
4. Top with avocado slices and fresh cilantro. Enjoy!
5. This is an easy one-pot meal that’s loaded with veggies, low in fat, and full of flavor! You don’t need to
add cheese or tortilla strips the soup is full of flavor on it’s own!

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Sign the Canoe to Save the BWCA

Boundary Waters Blog - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 2:04pm

I’m not sure how many of you are aware of the journey Dave and Amy Freeman are currently on. The couple started paddling in Ely, Minnesota back in August and are on their way to Washington, DC. The purpose of their trip is to prevent mining in Minnesota that could potentially destroy the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Their canoe is their petition and they’ve collected thousands of signatures during the many miles of their travel thus far.  If you’d like to sign the petition there is no need to track them down but if you’d like to they are currently near Ottawa. It might be easier to just visit their website and sign the petition electronically.  Here’s a video explaining the threat to the Boundary Waters.

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Dual Fuel Control Today

Arrowhead Electric - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 1:41pm

A DUAL FUEL Rate Interruption will happen today, October 21, 2014 starting at 6:00 pm until 8:00pm. Water heat control 5:30pm-9:30pm. Dual Fuel Interruptions are usually posted on the Boreal News Feed, our Facebook Page, and on our website at http://www.aecimn.com/residential/rate-and-rebate-programs/ and on Great River Energy’s website at http://lmguide.grenergy.com/.

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Where are We in October?

Unorganized Territory - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 11:09am

 

 

Cook County News-Herald staffers love to get out and about the county. So we decided, while we are traveling the highway and bushwhacking through the forest, to take pictures to see if our readers can guess WHERE ARE WE?

Last month’s photo of Highway 61 as it crosses the Onion River—viewed from above at the Ray Berglund State Wayside—was recognized by a number of readers. We did not receive any incorrect guesses this month. Drawn from the correct entries was Mike Nelson of Tofte.

Congratulations to Mike, he wins a one-year subscription to the Cook County News-Herald.

Try your luck! Take a look at the October photo. If you think you know where we were when we took the picture, send us your answer. The location will be announced next month and a winner will be drawn from all the correct answers. Whoever is drawn will win a free one-year subscription to the Cook County News-Herald (a $30 value). Good luck!

Return answer by mail, e-mail or fax to:

Cook County News-Herald

PO Box 757

Grand Marais MN 55604

starnews@boreal.org

Fax: 218-387-9500

Answer to the October WHERE ARE WE? must be received by November 10, 2014.

 


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Long pants and big wigs

Unorganized Territory - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 10:58am

School has started so that means Girl Scouts are meeting again. That means things are a little more hectic in Unorganized Territory

Being a Girl Scout leader is very rewarding. It was fun over the summer to see “my” Girl Scouts at various events. And it was delightful to welcome them back to our first meeting, to receive hug after hug from happy young ladies.

But it’s also a challenge getting back in the swing of weekly meetings, monthly leader meetings and planning activities for the various badges the girls need to earn.

At first just remembering the name of our region—Girl Scouts Minnesota -Wisconsin Lakes and Pines (GSMWLP)—was tough. Until the other leaders let me in on the secret mnemonic—Girl Scouts Must Wear Long Pants! It is so silly I’ll never forget it.

I do however, sometimes forget that we are supposed to have an activity for those very energetic young ladies on Thursday afternoons. More than once I’ve ended up frantically googling “Girl Scout activities” just hours before a meeting.

Being a leader forces me to be more organized. There is no one-size-fits-all curriculum for Girl Scouts. There are suggested activities for the assorted awards, but much of it is left to the leaders’ discretion.

For example, our fourth-grade Scouts are working on the Flower badge. The leader handbook gives some basic ideas—meet with a botanist, go on a field trip to identify wild flowers, or learn about how flowers are used in the perfume industry or healing arts.

Our fifth-grade Girl Scouts are working their way through the “Agents of Change” journey. It’s an empowering process that teaches the girls that one person can make a difference in the world and also teaches them the importance of working together. At the end of their journey they must work together on some sort of community service project. My co-leader/daughter-in-law Michele and I can’t wait to see what they come up with.

But there are no step-by-step directions for these things. Which is sometimes difficult, especially with the additional challenge of leading both fourth- and fifth-grade girls.

Michele is the leader for the fifth-graders and I’m her co-leader. I’m the leader for the fourth-graders and Michele is my co-leader. With different badges for the different ages, we try to plan ahead because it of course makes meetings go much smoother but sometimes we just can’t. Hence the googling of Girl Scout activities.

At a recent leader meeting, all of us burst out laughing when we heard that the instruction manual for new leaders states that a leader can expect to spend about four hours a month on Girl Scout duties. How do these super leaders get it all done in just four hours? How organized are these women, we wondered?

However, constant time crunch aside, being a Girl Scout leader is an awesome experience. The loose curriculum can be exasperating but it also gives us the flexibility to come up with interesting ways to fulfill badge requirements.

One of the fun things Girl Scout leaders get to do is take part in parades with the girls!

We’ve had some great adventures. While working on our Brownie “Water Journey” badges, we visited the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources fisheries building at Devil Track Lake, a field trip the girls loved. We also visited the Grand Marais Public Utilities wastewater treatment plant—something the girls did not enjoy as much.

While working on our Artist badge, we painted, painted and painted on all sorts of surfaces. We had a great afternoon with Hovland artist David Hahn. We created chalk art on the pavement and we hiked to the Grand Marais Art Colony to see the plein air exhibit.

As leaders we get to see “our” girls growing up before our eyes. To earn their Citizenship and Patriotism badges, we talked a lot about the history of our country and our flag. We wrote cards and sent them—along with Girl Scout cookies—to folks in the military with Cook County ties. And when each troop was in third grade, they took on the task of conducting the flag ceremony at Girl Scout events.

We’ve also had some hilarious moments. While preparing for Girl Scout Investiture, the ceremony that rededicates us all to the Girl Scout mission at the beginning of the year, Michele and I lectured the girls a bit about proper behavior at this event. Officials from Girl Scouts Minnesota -Wisconsin Lakes and Pines would be at the meeting, Michele told the girls. She cautioned them that they needed to behave in front of the “bigwigs” from Duluth.

The look on our Girl Scouts’ faces was priceless. Big wigs? We could see the question in their eyes—why do the Duluth women have weird hair? Just how big are these wigs?

It took a little while to explain the odd phrase and get our meeting back on track. And I think perhaps our girls were a little disappointed when the GSMWLP representatives showed up at Investiture with ordinarylooking hair.

It makes me smile every time I think of it. Just one of the many rewards of being a Girl Scout leader.

~~~~~~

Becoming a leader is synonymous with becoming yourself. It is precisely that simple, and it is also that difficult.

Warren Bennis


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10/21/14 - Gene Dale Kalligher sent along this wonderful picture of Sawbill Canoe Outfitters after a recent visit.

Sawbill Newsletter - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 10:24am

10/21/14 - Gene Dale Kalligher sent along this wonderful picture of Sawbill Canoe Outfitters and our refurbished canoes for sale after a recent visit. He has an excellent photography blog at: www.intotheoutside.com.


When I saw this picture I thought, "I want to live at this place... oh, wait..."

I snapped this shot of a couple embarking from the Sawbill Lake canoe landing a few days ago.


The weather in October can be lovely, but it can also be nasty. I always advise to plan for the worst and hope for the best. - Bill

Here is last week's edition of the Cook County West End News from WTIP, North Shore Community Radio.

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Eyes on the Sky This Week

Boundary Waters Blog - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 4:35pm

It seems like there have been more reasons to keep your eyes on the sky this year.  There have been numerous solar flares causing what seems like higher than normal northern light activity and we had the lunar eclipse a couple of weeks ago. This week there will be a partial solar eclipse and tonight is the peak of the Orionid meteor showers.  It’s a great week to visit somewhere like the Gunflint Trail where the skies are dark from the absence of  light pollution providing a great place to keep your eyes on the sky.

This week: solar eclipse and Orionid meteor shower By Mike Lynch

Posted:   10/19/2014 12:01:00 AM CDT | Updated:   about 2 hours ago

This year has been a good year for eclipses. In April and again this month, we witnessed a total lunar eclipse. And this week, we’ll see a partial solar eclipse

Lunar eclipses are a lot more common than solar eclipses. Next year, we’ll have two more total lunar eclipses. The next solar eclipse visible from the continental United States will occur on Aug. 21, 2017.

Thursday’s solar eclipse will begin around 4:23 p.m. and peak at 5:35 p.m., when slightly more than half of the sun’s disk will be covered by the moon. We won’t see much of the eclipse after that because the partially eclipsed sun will set at 6:15 p.m.

It’s going to look weird. There will be a definite reduction in daylight in the late afternoon, kind of like twilight occuring before the sun has set.

Plan to watch the solar eclipse the right way. Staring at the sun is never a good idea; doing so can permanently damage your eyes. Never, never look at the sun with a pair of binoculars or a telescope.

In the past several columns, I’ve written about special safety glasses you can buy to view a solar eclipse. I hope you got a pair.

If not, use the projection method to safely watch the moon march across the sun. Make a pinhole in a piece of white cardboard. Find another piece of stiff white cardboard or fiberboard. Stand with you back to the sun and hold the pinhole piece toward the sun. Aim the shadow of that cardboard over the blank cardboard, and watch the eclipse.

Autumn is known for meteor showers.

 One of them is the fairly reliable Orionid meteor shower that will peak between midnight Monday and the start of morning twilight Tuesday. The Earth, as it orbits the sun, is heading into a trail of debris left behind by Halley’s Comet. Due to the absence of moonlight, sky-watchers in the outer suburbs or the countryside may see 20 to 30 meteors an hour.

Mike Lynch is an amateur astronomer and professional broadcast meteorologist for WCCO Radio and is author of the book, “Stars, a Month by Month Tour of the Constellations” published by Adventure Publications (adventurepublications.net). Check out his website at lynchandthestars.com. Write to him at mikewlynch@comcast.net.

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A Little Anti-Freeze Ingredient With Your Breakfast Sandwich?

Aging Youthful - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 1:00am

Each week I as I look for a subject on the What’s REALLY in our food posting, I get more and more sad about what is allowed to go into our food supply. What is most disturbing; many of these ingredients are banned in other countries, so when you go to a McDonald’s or buy a Gatorade overseas, they will NOT have the harmful ingredients in them, PROVING that it can be made without it and still appeal to the masses. If that doesn’t get you angry, it should!

Forbes magazine researched the ingredients in fast food breakfast egg sandwiches. While eggs are an ingredient, you may be surprised to find other nasty ingredients as well: propylene glycol (Subway), Potassium sorbate (McDonalds), Soy Oil (Dunkin’ Donuts). Article author, David DiSalvo says:

I found several interesting ingredients, and one big surprise (at least it was surprising to me). I fully expected that McDonald’s or Burger King would take the prize for the most unrecognizable ingredients, but neither one stacks up to the egg manipulation of Subway.  McDonald’s still takes second prize, but as you’ll see, it’s the “Eat Fresh” folks whose list is easily the most baffling.

I would have to agree that I am surprised Subway made the top of the list…”Eat Fresh” anti-freeze ingredients?  Again, choose to have fresh foods as much as possible. If you are in a rush for breakfast, choose a protein meal replacement shake, but again be sure to READ THE LABELS. Many of them are full of harmful and artificial junk and fillers as well. There is a reason I chose organic, undenatured whey protein concentrate from an exclusive cattle herd in New Zealand!

 

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Pink Paddles for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Boundary Waters Blog - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 10:31am

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. You’ll notice more pink in October than you will on Valentine’s Day and almost as much pink as you find at our annual Mush for a Cure event on the Gunflint Trail.

A long time ago I created the Pink Paddle.  It’s a graphite, bent-shaft canoe paddle made by Wenonah and it’s PINK! I decided to do this to raise funds for breast cancer and thought it was a good idea.  It turns out it didn’t raise alot of money for the National Breast Cancer Foundation but Mush for a Cure has. You can find Mush for a Cure on the main sponsor page of the NBCF website as we’ve donated $226,500 over the years.

The Pink Paddles are great paddles and I love paddling with mine. It’s lightweight, durable and always gets attention. The logo on the paddle represents a blessing and means,”May your new beginning bring you strength, peace and tranquility and may your journeys over water always be safe.”

I didn’t order too many of the paddles to begin with and I have a few of the paddles left for sale.  On the last order the handles came separate from the shaft so we can cut the paddles to a specific size.  We then glue and epoxy the handle onto the shaft and it doesn’t always end up as beautiful as the ones that came pre-cut and glued from the manufacturer.  I have retailed them over the years for $155.00 each plus shipping and handling.  Depending upon where the paddle is getting shipped the cost varies from $9-$20.

For the month of October we’re willing to let these paddles go for $99 plus shipping and handling.  If you’re interested in purchasing one then email or give us a call at 1-888-CANOEIT.  It’s a great price for a unique paddle.

 

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Planning for the 2015 Paddling Season

Boundary Waters Blog - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 10:13am

It’s the end of the paddling season at Voyageur Canoe Outfitters. We may still have a few folks who come up for a late fall trip but for all practical purposes the 2014 BWCA canoe camping season is over. That means the Voyageur crew will continue to prepare for winter by cleaning and storing all of our canoes and gear.

Sometimes Mike likes to make it easier on the crew by offering used gear for sale. If you buy it then they do not have to deal with it!  We still have some nice canoes, packs and paddles for sale at a great price. You may have received an email with this information already but if not, then here it is.

Also included in the email was a special for outfitting in 2015. It is a canoe and equipment package for 50% off but we’re only selling 50 of those and it has to be purchased by October 22nd.  You don’t need to know your dates for your trip, you just need to know you’re planning a BWCA or Quetico canoe trip in 2015.

We hope you are planning to visit us in 2015 as we look forward to the next paddling season.

 

 

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BWCA Campsite Study

Boundary Waters Blog - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:12pm

I came across an interesting article about a study done in the Boundary Waters. Thought you might find it interesting too.

Popular wilderness area requires intensive management to remain natural

October 17th, 2014 by Lynn Davis in Earth / Environment

Recreation ecologist Jeff Marion revisited dozens of campsites in Minnesota’s Boundary Waters that he had surveyed for his doctoral research in 1982.

 

Recreation ecologist Jeff Marion revisited dozens of campsites in Minnesota’s Boundary Waters that he had surveyed for his doctoral research in 1982.

Some 250,000 annual visitors to Minnesota’s Boundary Waters have a significant impact on the campsites along the area’s 1,000 lakes in America’s most visited wilderness area.

But while tree loss at campsites is huge, the news is not all bad, a Virginia Tech expert on the impacts of recreation on natural resources reported at the National Wilderness Conference in Albuquerque being held through Oct. 19.

In 1982, Jeff Marion, now an adjunct professor in the College of Natural Resources and Environment and a recreation ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, surveyed 96 of the 2,200 campsites in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness for his doctoral research.

With funding from his agency and the U.S. Forest Service, which manages the area, he returned in July 2014 to document the impact of continued use on those sites and to measure recovery on 10 sites that had been closed.

He was assisted by Holly Eagleston of Wenatchee, Washington, and Jeff Feldhaus of Omaha, Nebraska, doctoral students in the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, and field assistant Claire Underwood.

“In addition to documenting over three decades of camping impacts, this study is focused on helping managers make recreational visitation more sustainable,” said Marion.

An important finding of the 1982 survey is that the impact of use levels off. The impact on campsites receiving less than a dozen nights of use each year is two-thirds of that on sites receiving 60 or more visits. “Thus it’s better to have a small number of well-used campsites than to disperse use and impact across a large number of sites,” said Marion.

In 1982, researchers found tree damage at almost every site, root exposure at 84 percent of the sites, virtually no seedlings or saplings, and the replacement of native broad-leafed herbs by grasses and some nonnative plants.

In 2014, the researchers made the same 94 measurements at each site. They measured soil loss, root exposure, tree damage, canopy cover, and vegetation cover for each plant species, comparing the campsites to adjacent undisturbed control sites.

“It took 45 minutes per site and we did five or six per day, canoeing in between,” Marion said. “When a site was occupied, we asked permission. It was pretty cool to hear people tell stories about their experiences and about the importance of the Boundary Waters wilderness.”

The researchers documented 34 percent fewer trees on campsites than in 1982 and damage to 44 percent of the remaining trees “despite three decades of Leave No Trace instruction,” said Marion, who was a founding board member of the Leave No Trace education program.

In some cases, the Forest Service had removed potentially hazardous trees, a few sites had been reached by forest fires, and some suffered wind damage, “so we can’t say that trees are missing just because of recreational use,” Marion said. “But visitors continue to cut trees and strip birch bark to start fires, which essentially girdles the trees and can kill them.”

“We found 384 stumps on campsites, and 1,054 stumps were visible from campsite boundaries,” he continued. “That’s an avoidable impact because you can get firewood from fallen trees.”

Site use compacts and erodes the soil, which is one of the impacts that does not level off. The 81 sites measured this year have lost an estimated 194 dump truck loads of soil, or 1,935 cubic yards, Marion reported. “It’s a small amount each year, but cumulative.”

But there was also good news. Nonnative plants, such as dandelions and chickweed, were confined to campsites. The researchers did not find the invasive plant goutweed, which can out-compete native plants and was seen in 1982. The grasses that have spread across the sunnier campsites, a result of tree loss, are effectively reducing erosion.

And the closed sites can recover fully. While noting that impact is rapid and recovery slow, Marion reported that in three cases they were not able to pick the closed sites out of the wilderness. “That is wonderful news,” he said.

He estimated that 15 years is enough time for a site to largely recover. “Bark will even grow over ax scars on trees.”

Designated a protected wilderness area in 1964, the 109.5-million-acre Boundary Waters is among the country’s best-managed wilderness areas, Marion said. “They are leaders in wilderness management. In 1983 I assisted Forest Service staff with a new effort to have their trail maintenance crew work on campsites. We developed site management actions that would prevent or reduce camping impacts.”

Federal budget cuts over the past decade, however, have limited management efforts, according to Marion.

“If you have high visitation you have to pair it with intense management, but you have to do it in a natural way,” he added. The philosophy of wilderness management is for impacts and management to remain “substantially unnoticeable,” according to the Wilderness Act.

As Marion reported at the National Wilderness Conference, which observed the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, suggestions for preserving wilderness areas include closing less sustainable campsites and selecting, constructing, and maintaining more resistant sites. Best management practices include selecting sites that have bedrock in the sloping areas and limited amounts of flat terrain.

“And there must be visitor education, including improved Leave No Trace guidance and better communication,” he said.

Provided by Virginia Tech

“Popular wilderness area requires intensive management to remain natural.” October 17th, 2014. http://phys.org/news/2014-10-popular-wilderness-area-requires-intensive.html

 

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Aging Youthful’s Top 3 Rules for Internal Freedom

Aging Youthful - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:20am

It’s #FreedomFriday at #AgingYouthful For each of us and different aspects of our lives, freedom can have many meanings. I believe freedom begins with how we feel about ourselves and our lives; an internal feeling. My Top Three Rules for internal freedom:

1. You must learn to FLY: First Love Yourself
2. You must feed your soul and follow your heart
3. While listed last, but the most important: You cannot give a damn what other people think.

What would you add to this list?

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10/17/14 - Current Sawbill crew member Brian Henry captured this calm day optical illusion

Sawbill Newsletter - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:13am

10/17/14 - Current Sawbill crew member Brian Henry captured this calm day optical illusion a couple of days ago when we were enjoying a gorgeous stretch of Indian summer. - Bill


Which way is up?

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Old enough to vote*

Unorganized Territory - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:06am

I am diligent about voting. I am a firm believer in the adage, “If you don’t vote, don’t complain.”

I have voted in every election since I was old enough to vote, even when it was inconvenient. For most of the years that I lived away from Minnesota with my soldier husband, I cast my vote by absentee ballot. From Washington State, Germany, Colorado and California, I went through the steps to apply for an absentee ballot and get it returned promptly.

Some of Cook County’s hard-working vote counters in the 2010 election.

But with every election, I imagined one day being able to go to the polls to cast my vote—the polls back “home” in Minnesota. I remember going with my mom when she voted at a town hall. My memory is sketchy, but I think she voted at what is now a house at the top of Fall River Road (County Road 13). I remember the U.S. flag hanging at the entrance. I remember neighbors visiting as they were coming and going.

I also remember controversy about voting when I was a teenager. It may seem unbelievable to the current generation, but when I was growing up, you had to be 21 years old to vote. There were a lot of changes in the turbulent ’60s and lowering the voting age to 18 was one of them.

I was a bit young to follow all the debate about letting 18-yearolds vote. Apparently the suggestion was first made before I was even born. President Dwight D. Eisenhower was the first president to endorse voting rights for 18-year-old citizens in his 1954 State of the Union Address.

It took quite awhile for the idea to take hold and there was a great deal of legal maneuvering as many states questioned the federal government’s right to lower the minimum voting age. States that refused to follow the federal government’s lead faced the need to have separate voting rolls and special ballots for voters between 18 and 20 years old for federal elections.

I don’t remember all this legal wrangling, but I do remember the young men facing the draft into military service—and the possibility of being sent off to fight in the Vietnam War—demanding the right to vote. I remember news stories on our old black and white TV about the horrors of the war. I remember watching footage of anti-war protests and amongst the protest signs there were some that read, “Old enough to fight, old enough to vote.”

In those times of trouble in our nation that message appeared to be something citizens could finally agree on. On March 10, 1971, the U.S. Senate voted 94-0 in favor of an amendment lowering the voting age. On March 23, 1971, the U.S. House of Representatives voted 401-19 in favor of the proposal.

Amazingly states followed suit. To add an amendment to the U.S. Constitution, three-fourths of the United States must ratify Congress’s action. I’m proud to note that Minnesota was among the first five states to agree. Ratification was completed on July 1, 1971 when enough states had taken action. On July 5, 1971, with President Richard Nixon as witness, the Twenty-Sixth Amendment became part of the Constitution.

I was 14 years old and more interested in clothes and nail polish and whether or not the Beatles would ever get back together than politics, but I still remember feeling jubilant that I would soon be able to vote.

The first presidential election in which I had a vote was in 1976. I was able to choose between the Jimmy Carter/Walter Mondale or Gerald Ford/Bob Dole tickets. I won’t say who I voted for. But it was with great pride that I was able to vote in my first election. Even though it was an absentee ballot mailed back home to Minnesota.

I know it is unlikely that any 18-year-olds read Unorganized Territory. But if they do, I hope they take a minute to think of the struggle that went into establishing the right for them to vote.

Young women also owe a debt to the women suffragettes who fought for women’s right to vote. Without the work of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Jane Addams the 19th Amendment would never have come to pass.

But that’s another column. This week I’d just like to remind everyone in Unorganized Territory that voting is not something to take lightly.

So if you’re 18 and want to vote, take some time to go to the Cook County courthouse before the end of the day on Tuesday, October 14 to pre-register. You don’t have to pre-register, but it makes voting much easier.

When you pre-register your name gets added to the official roll of voters. In most of Cook County, that means you will receive a ballot in the mail. In the City of Grand Marais, it means when you go to the polling place, you’ll be on the list and will be able to enter the voting booth to cast your vote— quickly and easily. And hopefully, proudly.

Voters don’t decide issues, they decide who will decide issues.

George Will

* Apologies to any 18-year-olds for not getting this posted before the Oct. 14 pre-registration deadline. You can still vote! Contact your county’s auditor office for information.


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Good Morning Beautiful

Boundary Waters Blog - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 8:31pm

It’s always a beautiful morning on the Gunflint Trail. Thanks Voyageur Crew Tony for sharing the beauty with everyone.

Beautiful Gunflint Morning

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Dual Fuel Equipment Test

Arrowhead Electric - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 3:50pm

A scheduled annual Dual Fuel Equipment  TEST will affect members on the DUAL FUEL Interruptible rate Thursday, October 16th starting at 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. This TEST is for your benefit so you can make sure your automatic backup system is functioning well before the cold winter season arrives.

Arrowhead Electric apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and would like to thank you for your continued support while our radio receiver testing occurs. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Rose the AECI office at 663-7239.

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Wood is the Word at the Voyageur Brewery

Voyageur Brewing - Wed, 10/15/2014 - 3:28pm

Reusing barn wood in the new brewery

Reduce, REUSE, recycle at the Grand Marais brewery

Grand Marais Craft Beer in Minnesota

One of our goals in building the brewery in Grand Marais was to buy or use local whenever possible. We feel we have done an excellent job at that by using local carpenters, plumbers, electricians and tradespeople on the brewery. Another way we have contributed to reaching that goal is through our wood.

We recently took apart a barn at a farm up near Hovland, Minnesota. The wood in this barn was cut and milled right here on the North Shore by Otis Anderson many years ago. This wood will be used to decorate some of the walls inside the taproom.

The countertops and bar tops will be made using live edge white pine from Northern Minnesota. Hedstrom’s Mill in Grand Marais, Minnesota cut the wood specifically for our brewery project.

We’re also getting some reclaimed wood from a place in Duluth, Minnesota. We’re using Douglas Fir that is over 100 years old for tables.

It’s great to be able to reuse wood, be green and incorporate parts of our area history into our building.  We’re hoping to add more pieces of our area history to our brewery as we continue our building process.

Categories: Member Feeds

Opportunity to View Highway 61 Concept Designs and Provide Feedback: Oct. 28th

Moving Matters - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 4:17pm

Join the City of Grand Marais on October 28th for an open house and presentation of concept designs for Highway 61 through Grand Marais. Your feedback and input is needed! A light meal will be provided and free childcare* will be available at the Cook County Community YMCA.

Tuesday, October 28th
6 – 8 pm
Bethlehem Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall
417 1st Ave. West, Grand Marais

Questions? Contact Mike Roth, City Administrator at cityhall@boreal.org or call (218) 387-1848. For more information and updates, visit www.becausemovingmatters.org/highway61.

*Free childcare is available for families participating in the evening, for children age 4 months and over. Drop-off will be at the YMCA starting at 5:30 pm, pick-up after the event.

Categories: Member Feeds

10/12/14 - Lou's Shoes

Sawbill Newsletter - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 7:44pm

10/12/14 - Our very own Cindy Lou Hansen got back today from a four day shoemaking class taught by Jason Hovatter at the North House Folk School in Grand Marais. "I can't even begin to tell you how many steps went into making these," she said as she showed off her beautiful new pair of shoes, "No pun intended!" - Peter


We're trying to convince Cindy to switch careers from canoe outfitting to shoemaking. She could call her business Lou's Shoes!

Categories: Member Feeds