Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 24

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 26 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

I am compiling the BrainBashers world almanac and it now contains lots of pages.

I know that it takes 121 digits to print the page numbers in sequence.

How many numbered pages does the book have and how many times does the number 9 appear?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 24 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 26 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 24

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 26 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Common Answers
   Compete with the rest of the world by predicting the most common answers to 10 easy questions.
[Played on the BrainBashers Puzzle/Illusion website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 26 min ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 23

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 11:30pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What number do you get if you divide 200 by 1/2 and add 7?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 23 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 11:30pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 23

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 11:30pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Mass Attack
   Drop weights to balance the scales. It's much more addictive than it sounds!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

April 24, 1916: Easter Rebellion begins

This Day in History - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1916, on Easter Monday in Dublin, the Irish Republican Brotherhood, a secret organization of Irish nationalists led by Patrick Pearse, launches the so-called Easter Rebellion, an armed uprising against British rule. Assisted by militant Irish socialists under James Connolly, Pearse and his fellow Republicans rioted and attacked British provincial government headquarters across Dublin and seized the Irish capital's General Post Office. Following these successes, they proclaimed the independence of Ireland, which had been under the repressive thumb of the United Kingdom for centuries, and by the next morning were in control of much of the city. Later that day, however, British authorities launched a counteroffensive, and by April 29 the uprising had been crushed. Nevertheless, the Easter Rebellion is considered a significant marker on the road to establishing an independent Irish republic.

Following the uprising, Pearse and 14 other nationalist leaders were executed for their participation and held up as martyrs by many in Ireland. There was little love lost among most Irish people for the British, who had enacted a series of harsh anti-Catholic restrictions, the Penal Laws, in the 18th century, and then let 1.5 million Irish starve during the Potato Famine of 1845-1848. Armed protest continued after the Easter Rebellion and in 1921, 26 of Ireland's 32 counties won independence with the declaration of the Irish Free State. The Free State became an independent republic in 1949. However, six northeastern counties of the Emerald Isle remained part of the United Kingdom, prompting some nationalists to reorganize themselves into the Irish Republican Army (IRA) to continue their struggle for full Irish independence.

In the late 1960s, influenced in part by the U.S. civil rights movement, Catholics in Northern Ireland, long discriminated against by British policies that favored Irish Protestants, advocated for justice. Civil unrest broke out between Catholics and Protestants in the region and the violence escalated as the pro-Catholic IRA battled British troops. An ongoing series of terrorist bombings and attacks ensued in a drawn-out conflict that came to be known as "The Troubles." Peace talks eventually took place throughout the mid- to late 1990s, but a permanent end to the violence remained elusive. Finally, in July 2005, the IRA announced its members would give up all their weapons and pursue the group's objectives solely through peaceful means. By the fall of 2006, the Independent Monitoring Commission reported that the IRA's military campaign to end British rule was over.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 7:00pm
"Anybody can sympathise with the sufferings of a friend, but it requires a very fine nature to sympathise with a friend's success."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Donald Foster

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 7:00pm
"No one who cannot rejoice in the discovery of his own mistakes deserves to be called a scholar."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Jean-Paul Sartre

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 7:00pm
"Three o'clock is always too late or too early for anything you want to do."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 7:00pm
"I hate quotations. Tell me what you know."
Categories: Fun Stuff

bas-relief

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 23, 2014 is:

bas-relief • \bah-rih-LEEF\  • noun
: sculptural relief in which the projection from the surrounding surface is slight and no part of the modeled form is undercut; also : sculpture executed in bas-relief

Examples:
Jamal admired the bas-reliefs carved into the walls of the ancient Assyrian palace.

"Nearly 50 people … came to the unveiling on Friday afternoon and watched as Mayor Marina Khubesrian and Rep. Judy Chu, D-Pasadena, pulled the covering off the bas-relief to reveal a father reading to his three daughters." — From an article by Zen Vuong in the San Gabriel Valley Tribune (California), March 22, 2014

Did you know?
The best way to understand the meaning of "bas-relief" is to see one—and the easiest way to do that is to pull one out of your pocket. Just take out a penny, nickel, or other coin and examine the raised images on it; they're all bas-reliefs. English speakers adopted "bas-relief" from French (where "bas" means "low" and "relief" means "raised work") during the mid-1600s. A few decades earlier, we also borrowed the synonymous "basso-relievo" from Italian. The French and Italian terms have common ancestors (and, in fact, the French word is likely a translation of the Italian), but English speakers apparently borrowed the two independently. "Bas-relief" is more prevalent in English today, although the Italian-derived term has not disappeared completely from the language.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 22

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 11:16pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What number comes next in this sequence:

1 4 1 5 9 2 ==?==

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 22 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 11:16pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 22

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 11:16pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Magnetism
   Drop the ball into the pot under the guidance of the magnets.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

April 23, 1564: William Shakespeare born

This Day in History - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 11:00pm

According to tradition, the great English dramatist and poet William Shakespeare is born in Stratford-on-Avon on April 23, 1564. It is impossible to be certain the exact day on which he was born, but church records show that he was baptized on April 26, and three days was a customary amount of time to wait before baptizing a newborn. Shakespeare's date of death is conclusively known, however: it was April 23, 1616. He was 52 years old and had retired to Stratford three years before.

Although few plays have been performed or analyzed as extensively as the 38 plays ascribed to William Shakespeare, there are few surviving details about the playwright's life. This dearth of biographical information is due primarily to his station in life; he was not a noble, but the son of John Shakespeare, a leather trader and the town bailiff. The events of William Shakespeare's early life can only be gleaned from official records, such as baptism and marriage records.

He probably attended the grammar school in Stratford, where he would have studied Latin and read classical literature. He did not go to university but at age 18 married Anne Hathaway, who was eight years his senior and pregnant at the time of the marriage. Their first daughter, Susanna, was born six months later, and in 1585 William and Anne had twins, Hamnet and Judith. Hamnet, Shakespeare's only son, died 11 years later, and Anne Shakespeare outlived her husband, dying in 1623. Nothing is known of the period between the birth of the twins and Shakespeare's emergence as a playwright in London in the early 1590s, but unfounded stories have him stealing deer, joining a group of traveling players, becoming a schoolteacher, or serving as a soldier in the Low Countries.

The first reference to Shakespeare as a London playwright came in 1592, when a fellow dramatist, Robert Greene, wrote derogatorily of him on his deathbed. It is believed that Shakespeare had written the three parts of Henry VI by that point. In 1593, Venus and Adonis was Shakespeare's first published poem, and he dedicated it to the young Henry Wriothesley, the 3rd earl of Southampton. In 1594, having probably composed, among other plays, Richard III, The Comedy of Errors, and The Taming of the Shrew, he became an actor and playwright for the Lord Chamberlain's Men, which became the King's Men after James I's ascension in 1603. The company grew into England's finest, in no small part because of Shakespeare, who was its principal dramatist. It also had the finest actor of the day, Richard Burbage, and the best theater, the Globe, which was located on the Thames' south bank. Shakespeare stayed with the King's Men until his retirement and often acted in small parts.

By 1596, the company had performed the classic Shakespeare plays Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, and A Midsummer Night's Dream. That year, John Shakespeare was granted a coat of arms, a testament to his son's growing wealth and fame. In 1597, William Shakespeare bought a large house in Stratford. In 1599, after producing his great historical series, the first and second part of Henry IV and Henry V, he became a partner in the ownership of the Globe Theatre.

The beginning of the 17th century saw the performance of the first of his great tragedies, Hamlet. The next play, The Merry Wives of Windsor, was written at the request of Queen Elizabeth I, who wanted to see another play that included the popular character Falstaff. During the next decade, Shakespeare produced such masterpieces as Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Tempest. In 1609, his sonnets, probably written during the 1590s, were published. The 154 sonnets are marked by the recurring themes of the mutability of beauty and the transcendent power of love and art.

Shakespeare died in Stratford-on-Avon on April 23, 1616. Today, nearly 400 years later, his plays are performed and read more often and in more nations than ever before. In a million words written over 20 years, he captured the full range of human emotions and conflicts with a precision that remains sharp today. As his great contemporary the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson said, "He was not of an age, but for all time."

Categories: Fun Stuff

Benjamin Franklin

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 7:00pm
"But in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Will Rogers

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 7:00pm
"There ought to be one day-- just one-- when there is open season on senators."
Categories: Fun Stuff

H. P. Lovecraft

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 7:00pm
"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents."
Categories: Fun Stuff