Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - May 6

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 05/06/2015 - 8:22pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

If even numbers are green and odd numbers are yellow, what colour is yellow + yellow?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - May 6 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 05/06/2015 - 8:22pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - May 6

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 05/06/2015 - 8:22pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Snail Bob
   Help this slimy but spirited snail make the journey to his sparkling new home.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 05/06/2015 - 8:22pm
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

dauntless

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Wed, 05/06/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 06, 2015 is:

dauntless • \DAWNT-lus\  • adjective
: resolute especially in the face of danger or difficulty : fearless, undaunted

Examples:
The rescuers were dauntless, battling cold, wind, and fatigue to reach the injured mountain climbers.

"In recent years Scandinavian central bankers have shown the same dauntless appetite for exploration that once saw Nordic ships fan out across the globe." — Financial Times, April 9, 2015

Did you know?
The history of the world is peopled with dauntless men and women who refused to be subdued or "tamed" by fear. The word dauntless can be traced back to Latin domare, meaning "to tame" or "to subdue." When our verb daunt (a domare descendant borrowed by way of Anglo-French) was first used in the 14th century, it shared these meanings. The now-obsolete "tame" sense referred to the taming or breaking of wild animals, particularly horses: an undaunted horse was an unbroken horse. Not until the late 16th century did we use undaunted with the meaning "undiscouraged and courageously resolute" to describe people. By then, such lionhearted souls could also be described as undauntable, and finally, in Henry VI, Part 3, Shakespeare gave us dauntless.

Categories: Fun Stuff

May 06, 1994: English Channel tunnel opens

This Day in History - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 11:00pm

In a ceremony presided over by England’s Queen Elizabeth II and French President Francois Mitterand, a rail tunnel under the English Channel was officially opened, connecting Britain and the European mainland for the first time since the Ice Age.

The channel tunnel, or “Chunnel,” connects Folkstone, England, with Sangatte, France, 31 miles away. The Chunnel cut travel time between England and France to a swift 35 minutes and eventually between London and Paristo two-and-a-half hours.

As the world’s longest undersea tunnel, the Chunnel runs under water for 23 miles, with an average depth of 150 feet below the seabed. Each day, about 30,000 people, 6,000 cars and 3,500 trucks journey through the Chunnel on passenger, shuttle and freight trains.

Millions of tons of earth were moved to build the two rail tunnels–one for northbound and one for southbound traffic–and one service tunnel. Fifteen thousandpeople were employed at the peak of construction. Ten people were killed during construction.

Napoleon’s engineer, Albert Mathieu, planned the first tunnel under the English Channel in 1802, envisioning an underground passage with ventilation chimneys that would stretch above the waves. In 1880, the first real attempt was made by Colonel Beaumont, who bore a tunnel more than a mile long before abandoning the project. Other efforts followed in the 20th century, but none on the scale of the tunnels begun in June 1988.

The Chunnel’s $16 billion cost was roughly twice the original estimate, and completion was a year behind schedule. One year into service, Eurotunnel announced a huge loss, one of the biggest in United Kingdom corporate history at the time. A scheme in which banks agreed to swap billions of pounds worth of loans for shares saved the tunnel from going under and it showed its first net profit in 1999.

Freight traffic was suspended for six months after a fire broke out on a lorry in the tunnel in November 1996. Nobody was seriously hurt in the incident.

In 1996, the American Society of Civil Engineers identified the tunnel as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - May 5

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 8:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

I have two children. At least one of them is a boy.

What is the probability that both my children are boys?

My sister also has two children. The older child is a girl.

What is the probability that both her children are girls?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - May 5 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 8:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - May 5

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 8:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Mouse In Danger
   A mouse memory game where you have to guide the cursor through a hidden maze.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Gene Fowler

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 7:00pm
"Men are not against you; they are merely for themselves."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Albert Schweitzer

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 7:00pm
"Happiness is nothing more than good health and a bad memory."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Queen Juliana

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 7:00pm
"I can't understand it. I can't even understand the people who can understand it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Henry Cate VII

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 7:00pm
"The problem with political jokes is they get elected."
Categories: Fun Stuff

epigram

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 05, 2015 is:

epigram • \EP-ih-gram\  • noun
1 : a concise poem dealing pointedly and often satirically with a single thought or event and often ending with an ingenious turn of thought 2 : a terse, sage, or witty and often paradoxical saying 3 : expression marked by the use of epigrams

Examples:
On the wall of his studio, Jonathan kept a framed print of his favorite epigram from Benjamin Franklin: "Little strokes fell great oaks."

"But this is a work that tends to rely on pithy epigrams, rather than build a sturdy narrative arc about a young artist's awakening and an old artist's raging against the dying of the light." — Kerry Reid, Chicago Tribune, February 13, 2015

Did you know?
Ancient Greeks and Romans used the word epigramma (from Greek epigraphein, meaning "to write on") to refer to a concise, witty, and often satirical verse. The Roman poet Martial (who published eleven books of these epigrammata, or epigrams, between the years 86 and 98 C.E.) was a master of the form: "You puff the poets of other days, / the living you deplore. / Spare me the accolade: your praise / Is not worth dying for." English speakers adopted the "verse" sense of the word when we first used epigram for a concise poem dealing pointedly and often satirically with a single thought or event in the 15th century. In the late 18th century, we began using epigram for concise, witty sayings, even if they didn't rhyme.

Categories: Fun Stuff

May 05, 1961: The first American in space

This Day in History - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 11:00pm

From Cape Canaveral, Florida, Navy Commander Alan Bartlett Shepard Jr. is launched into space aboard the Freedom 7 space capsule, becoming the first American astronaut to travel into space. The suborbital flight, which lasted 15 minutes and reached a height of 116 miles into the atmosphere, was a major triumph for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

NASA was established in 1958 to keep U.S. space efforts abreast of recent Soviet achievements, such as the launching of the world’s first artificial satellite–Sputnik 1–in 1957. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the two superpowers raced to become the first country to put a man in space and return him to Earth. On April 12, 1961, the Soviet space program won the race when cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin was launched into space, put in orbit around the planet, and safely returned to Earth. One month later, Shepard’s suborbital flight restored faith in the U.S. space program.

NASA continued to trail the Soviets closely until the late 1960s and the successes of the Apollo lunar program. In July 1969, the Americans took a giant leap forward with Apollo 11, a three-stage spacecraft that took U.S. astronauts to the surface of the moon and returned them to Earth. On February 5, 1971, Alan Shepard, the first American in space, became the fifth astronaut to walk on the moon as part of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - May 4

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 7:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

If I took 12 apples from a pile of 23 apples, how many apples would I have?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - May 4 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 7:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - May 4

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 7:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

BrainBashers Kiosk
   How well can you run BrainBashers Kiosk? A busy corner shop in the tourist season with glasses of lemonade and mugs of hot chocolate.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Seth MacFarlane

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 7:00pm
"The two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Lynn Johnston

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 05/04/2015 - 7:00pm
"Never tell anyone that you're writing a book, going on a diet, exercising, taking a course, or quitting smoking. They'll encourage you to death."
Categories: Fun Stuff