Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 27

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 55 min 44 sec ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What starts with an E, ends with an E and usually contains only one letter?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 27 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 55 min 44 sec ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 27

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 55 min 44 sec ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Alpha Attack
   Protect your town from attack by using the keyboard.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 55 min 44 sec ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 26

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 8:14pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Below you will find some well known eight-letter words, with only their endings remaining. Can you determine the words?

.....YEE
.....EGY
.....IGM
.....LSE
.....COM
.....BET
.....LEL
.....DEE

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 26 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 8:14pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 26

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 8:14pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Trapped In Time
   Guide your super-dude around the platform in carefully planned jumps.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

crabwise

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 26, 2014 is:

crabwise • \KRAB-wyze\  • adverb
1 : sideways 2 : in a sidling or cautiously indirect manner

Examples:
Rather than asking his parents for a car directly, Noah approached the matter crabwise, stressing how inconvenient it was for them to have to drive him everywhere.

"But personally, my bed … is just for sleeping in. It is actually … 6ft wide, and it is beautiful beyond words. No matter that I have to walk crabwise round the room in order to get in, out or dressed." — Lucy Mangan, The Guardian (London), January 4, 2011

Did you know?
There's no reason to be indirect when explaining the etymology of crabwise; we'll get right to the point. As you might guess, the meaning of that word is directly related to that sidling sea creature, the crab. If you live near the shore or have visited a beach near the sea, you have probably seen crabs scuttling along, often moving sideways and not taking what humans would consider the most direct route. The modern meanings of crabwise were definitely inspired by the crab's lateral or oblique approach to getting from one place to another. The word crept into English in the mid-19th century and has been sidling into our sentences ever since.

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 26, 1941: FDR establishes modern Thanksgiving holiday

This Day in History - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 11:00pm

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs a bill officially establishing the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day.

The tradition of celebrating the holiday on Thursday dates back to the early history of the Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies, when post-harvest holidays were celebrated on the weekday regularly set aside as "Lecture Day," a midweek church meeting where topical sermons were presented. A famous Thanksgiving observance occurred in the autumn of 1621, when Plymouth governor William Bradford invited local Indians to join the Pilgrims in a three-day festival held in gratitude for the bounty of the season.

Thanksgiving became an annual custom throughout New England in the 17th century, and in 1777 the Continental Congress declared the first national American Thanksgiving following the Patriot victory at Saratoga. In 1789, President George Washington became the first president to proclaim a Thanksgiving holiday, when, at the request of Congress, he proclaimed November 26, a Tuesday, as a day of national thanksgiving for the U.S. Constitution. However, it was not until 1863, when President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving to fall on the last Thursday of November, that the modern holiday was celebrated nationally.

With a few deviations, Lincoln's precedent was followed annually by every subsequent president--until 1939. In 1939, Franklin D. Roosevelt departed from tradition by declaring November 23, the next to last Thursday that year, as Thanksgiving Day. Considerable controversy surrounded this deviation, and some Americans refused to honor Roosevelt's declaration. For the next two years, Roosevelt repeated the unpopular proclamation, but on November 26, 1941, he admitted his mistake and signed a bill into law officially making the fourth Thursday in November the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 25

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 8:01pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Which is greater: the number of seconds in a year or miles light can travel in 3 minutes?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 25 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 8:01pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 25

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 8:01pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Extreme Trucks
   The monster trucks have returned. Drive them through water, snow, dirt in the most extreme European environments.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Christopher Morley

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 6:00pm
"Read, every day, something no one else is reading. Think, every day, something no one else is thinking. Do, every day, something no one else would be silly enough to do. It is bad for the mind to be always part of unanimity."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Evan Esar

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 6:00pm
"Statistician: A man who believes figures don't lie, but admits that under analysis some of them won't stand up either."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Rudyard Kipling

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 6:00pm
"Take everything you like seriously, except yourselves."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Paul Valery

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 6:00pm
"The folly of mistaking a paradox for a discovery, a metaphor for a proof, a torrent of verbiage for a spring of capital truths, and oneself for an oracle, is inborn in us."
Categories: Fun Stuff

pelagic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 25, 2014 is:

pelagic • \puh-LAJ-ik\  • adjective
: of, relating to, or living or occurring in the open sea : oceanic

Examples:
She is studying to become a marine biologist specializing in pelagic plant life.

"During this time we also have the seasonal migration of pelagic fish from the northern Gulf waters to the Key West area." — Sam O'Briant, The News-Press (Fort Myers, Florida), September 21, 2014

Did you know?
Pelagic comes to us from Greek, via Latin. The Greek word pelagikos became pelagicus in Latin and then pelagic in English. (Pelagikos is derived from pelagos, the Greek word for the sea—it is also a source of archipelago—plus the adjectival suffix -ikos.) Pelagic first showed up in dictionaries in 1656; a definition from that time says that Pelagick (as it was then spelled) meant "of the Sea, or that liveth in the Sea." Over 350 years later, writers are still using pelagic with the same meaning, albeit less frequently than its more familiar synonym oceanic.

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 25, 1952: Mousetrap opens in London

This Day in History - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 11:00pm

"The Mousetrap," a murder-mystery written by the novelist and playwright Agatha Christie, opens at the Ambassadors Theatre in London. The crowd-pleasing whodunit would go on to become the longest continuously running play in history, with more than 10 million people to date attending its more than 20,000 performances in London's West End.

When "The Mousetrap" premiered in 1952, Winston Churchill was British prime minister, Joseph Stalin was Soviet ruler, and Dwight D. Eisenhower was president-elect. Christie, already a hugely successful English mystery novelist, originally wrote the drama for Queen Mary, wife of the late King George V. Initially called "Three Blind Mice," it debuted as a 30-minute radio play on the queen's 80th birthday in 1947. Christie later extended the play and renamed it "The Mousetrap"—a reference to the play-within-a-play performed in William Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

On November 25, 1952, 453 people took their seats in the Ambassadors Theatre for the London premiere of Christie's "Mousetrap." The drama is played out at "Monkswell Manor," whose hosts and guests are snowed in among radio reports of a murderer on the loose. Soon a detective shows up on skis with the terrifying news that the murderer, and probably the next victim, are likely both among their number. Soon the clues and false leads pile as high as the snow. At every curtain call, the individual who has been revealed as the murderer steps forward and tells the audience that they are "partners in crime" and should "keep the secret of the whodunit locked in their heart."

Richard Attenborough and his wife, Sheila Sim, were the first stars of "The Mousetrap." To date, more than 300 actors and actresses have appeared in the roles of the eight characters. David Raven, who played "Major Metcalf" for 4,575 performances, is in the "Guinness Book of World Records" as the world's most durable actor, while Nancy Seabrooke is noted as the world's most patient understudy for 6,240 performances, or 15 years, as the substitute for "Mrs. Boyle."

"The Mousetrap" is not considered Christie's best play, and a prominent stage director once declared that "'The Mousetrap'" should be abolished by an act of Parliament." Nevertheless, the show's popularity has not waned. Asked about its enduring appeal, Christie said, "It is the sort of play you can take anyone to. It is not really frightening. It is not really horrible. It is not really a farce, but it has a little bit of all these things, and perhaps that satisfies a lot of different people." In 1974, after almost 9,000 shows, the play was moved to St. Martin's Theatre, where it remains today. Agatha Christie, who wrote scores of best-selling mystery novels, died in 1976.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 24

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 7:47pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What well known saying is represented by:

Initiate a cursory perusal prior to vaulting.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 24 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 7:47pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff