Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 54 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What comes next in this sequence:

Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron ==?==

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 19 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 54 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 54 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Keep Ups
   How long can you keep the ping-pong ball in the air?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 54 min ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

esculent

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - 22 hours 20 min ago

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 19, 2014 is:

esculent • \ESS-kyuh-lunt\  • adjective
: edible

Examples:
Morels are esculent mushrooms and are delicious, but be warned that there are also false morels, which are poisonous.

"The berry, which has two to three times more antioxidants than blueberries, falls from what the Brazilians call 'The Tree of Life', with about 90 per cent being inedible, but the esculent skin of the aҫaí tastes like a vibrant blend of berries and dark chocolate." — Sarah O'Brien, Newcastle Herald (Australia), December 14, 2013

Did you know?
One appealing thing about esculent is that this word, which comes from the Latin for food (esca), has been around for over 375 years. If we give you just one more tidbit of etymology—that esca is from Latin edere, which means "to eat"—can you pick which of the following words is NOT related to esculent? Comestible, edacious, edible, escalade, escarole, or obese. Comestible (meaning "edible"), edacious (meaning "voracious"), edible, escarole (a type of salad green), and obese are all descendants of edere. Only escalade (meaning "an act of scaling walls") doesn't belong on the list. It descends from the Italian scalare, meaning "to scale."

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 19, 1781: Victory at Yorktown

This Day in History - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 11:00pm

Hopelessly trapped at Yorktown, Virginia, British General Lord Cornwallis surrenders 8,000 British soldiers and seamen to a larger Franco-American force, effectively bringing an end to the American Revolution.

Lord Cornwallis was one of the most capable British generals of the American Revolution. In 1776, he drove General George Washington's Patriots forces out of New Jersey, and in 1780 he won a stunning victory over General Horatio Gates' Patriot army at Camden, South Carolina. Cornwallis' subsequent invasion of North Carolina was less successful, however, and in April 1781 he led his weary and battered troops toward the Virginia coast, where he could maintain seaborne lines of communication with the large British army of General Henry Clinton in New York City. After conducting a series of raids against towns and plantations in Virginia, Cornwallis settled in the tidewater town of Yorktown in August. The British immediately began fortifying the town and the adjacent promontory of Gloucester Point across the York River.

General George Washington instructed the Marquis de Lafayette, who was in Virginia with an American army of around 5,000 men, to block Cornwallis' escape from Yorktown by land. In the meantime, Washington's 2,500 troops in New York were joined by a French army of 4,000 men under the Count de Rochambeau. Washington and Rochambeau made plans to attack Cornwallis with the assistance of a large French fleet under the Count de Grasse, and on August 21 they crossed the Hudson River to march south to Yorktown. Covering 200 miles in 15 days, the allied force reached the head of Chesapeake Bay in early September.

Meanwhile, a British fleet under Admiral Thomas Graves failed to break French naval superiority at the Battle of Virginia Capes on September 5, denying Cornwallis his expected reinforcements. Beginning September 14, de Grasse transported Washington and Rochambeau's men down the Chesapeake to Virginia, where they joined Lafayette and completed the encirclement of Yorktown on September 28. De Grasse landed another 3,000 French troops carried by his fleet. During the first two weeks of October, the 14,000 Franco-American troops gradually overcame the fortified British positions with the aid of de Grasse's warships. A large British fleet carrying 7,000 men set out to rescue Cornwallis, but it was too late.

On October 19, General Cornwallis surrendered 7,087 officers and men, 900 seamen, 144 cannons, 15 galleys, a frigate, and 30 transport ships. Pleading illness, he did not attend the surrender ceremony, but his second-in-command, General Charles O'Hara, carried Cornwallis' sword to the American and French commanders. As the British and Hessian troops marched out to surrender, the British bands played the song "The World Turned Upside Down."

Although the war persisted on the high seas and in other theaters, the Patriot victory at Yorktown effectively ended fighting in the American colonies. Peace negotiations began in 1782, and on September 3, 1783, the Treaty of Paris was signed, formally recognizing the United States as a free and independent nation after eight years of war.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Sophocles

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"The keenest sorrow is to recognize ourselves as the sole cause of all our adversities."
Categories: Fun Stuff

H. L. Mencken

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"In the United States, doing good has come to be, like patriotism, a favorite device of persons with something to sell."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Thomas H. Huxley

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"Try to learn something about everything and everything about something."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Tellis Frank

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"The worst thing about Europe is that you can't go out in the middle of the night and get a Slurpee."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 6:12pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find three consecutive odd numbers that total 1,287 when multiplied together?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 18 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 6:12pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 6:12pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Crazy Chess
   Action packed arcade game where you pick up points by moving your knight using the rules of chess.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

neophilia

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 18, 2014 is:

neophilia • \nee-uh-FILL-ee-uh\  • noun
: love or enthusiasm for what is new or novel

Examples:
Loretta wondered if it was neophilia that led her husband to buy shiny new power tools even when the ones he already had were in perfect condition.

"Time was, not too many years ago, when shopping was a pleasure. The atmosphere at the malls, the array of items, the decor, the people, the variety of shops, all beckoned to our neophilia, although I wasn’t aware there was a word for it." — Juanita Hughes, Cherokee Tribune (Canton, Georgia), September 2, 2014

Did you know?
The earliest known example of neophilia in print is from an 1899 issue of Political Science Quarterly, a publication of Columbia University. The word is a combination of the Greek-derived combining forms neo-, meaning "new," and -philia, meaning "liking for." In the 1930s, the form neophily was introduced as a synonym of neophilia, but no neophilia could save it from obscurity—it has never caught on. The opposite of neophilia is neophobia, meaning "a dread of or aversion to novelty." It has been around slightly longer than neophilia, having first appeared in 1886.

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 18, 1867: U.S. takes possession of Alaska

This Day in History - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1867, the U.S. formally takes possession of Alaska after purchasing the territory from Russia for $7.2 million, or less than two cents an acre. The Alaska purchase comprised 586,412 square miles, about twice the size of Texas, and was championed by William Henry Seward, the enthusiasticly expansionist secretary of state under President Andrew Johnson.

Russia wanted to sell its Alaska territory, which was remote, sparsely populated and difficult to defend, to the U.S. rather than risk losing it in battle with a rival such as Great Britain. Negotiations between Seward (1801-1872) and the Russian minister to the U.S., Eduard de Stoeckl, began in March 1867. However, the American public believed the land to be barren and worthless and dubbed the purchase "Seward's Folly" and "Andrew Johnson's Polar Bear Garden," among other derogatory names. Some animosity toward the project may have been a byproduct of President Johnson's own unpopularity. As the 17th U.S. president, Johnson battled with Radical Republicans in Congress over Reconstruction policies following the Civil War. He was impeached in 1868 and later acquitted by a single vote. Nevertheless, Congress eventually ratified the Alaska deal. Public opinion of the purchase turned more favorable when gold was discovered in a tributary of Alaska's Klondike River in 1896, sparking a gold rush. Alaska became the 49th state on January 3, 1959, and is now recognized for its vast natural resources. Today, 25 percent of America's oil and over 50 percent of its seafood come from Alaska. It is also the largest state in area, about one-fifth the size of the lower 48 states combined, though it remains sparsely populated. The name Alaska is derived from the Aleut word alyeska, which means "great land." Alaska has two official state holidays to commemorate its origins: Seward's Day, observed the last Monday in March, celebrates the March 30, 1867, signing of the land treaty between the U.S. and Russia, and Alaska Day, observed every October 18, marks the anniversary of the formal land transfer.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Al Boliska

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Do you realize if it weren't for Edison we'd be watching TV by candlelight?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Henry David Thoreau

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Kin Hubbard

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Honesty pays, but it doesn't seem to pay enough to suit some people."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Jean Giraudoux

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that you've got it made."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 5:58pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Take a normal piece of paper, exactly 0.1 mm thick.

Fold it in half, and then in half again, and again, and again.

Do this a total of 50 times.

How thick would the final paper be?

Categories: Fun Stuff