Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - March 30

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 7 min 53 sec ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find the hidden country in the following sentence:

Ignorant of the grave danger, man yearns to discover the origins of life itself by looking for unknown life forms deep below the surface of our vast oceans.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - March 30 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 7 min 53 sec ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - March 30

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 7 min 53 sec ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Cup Stacking
   Type the correct letters to stack the cups as quickly as you can.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 7 min 53 sec ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

amphibology

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - 16 hours 58 min ago

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for March 30, 2015 is:

amphibology • \am-fuh-BAH-luh-jee\  • noun
: a sentence or phrase that can be interpreted in more than one way

Examples:
Still feeling some of the effects of her recent cold, Tara was bemused by the amphibology on the café's menu: "Try our soup—you won't get better."

"I have started an amphibology collection: my favourite to date is the garage that advertises its services with the words: 'Why go anywhere else to be robbed?'" — Jonathan Ford, Financial Times, July 27, 2012

Did you know?
A venerable old word in English, amphibology is from Greek amphibolos (via Late Latin and Latin). Amphibolos, from amphi- ("both") and ballein ("to throw"), literally means "encompassing" or "hitting at both ends"; figuratively it means "ambiguous." Amphibology is an equivocator's friend. An editor who has been sent an unsolicited manuscript to critique, for example, might reply, "I shall lose no time in reading your book." Or a dinner guest who feels the onset of heartburn might say something like, "Ah, that was a meal I shall not soon forget!" But amphibology’s ambiguity can be unintended and undesirable as well, as in "When Mom talked to Judy, she said she might call her back the next day." (Who said who might call whom back?)

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - March 29

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 11:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

At the local play group for babies and toddlers, I was asking the mothers about the number of teddies each of their children has.

The four children are aged 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Remarkably, the children have one, two, three and four teddies, although not necessarily respectively.

Darren has more teddies that his age. John is older than Matthew. Curiously only one child has the same number of teddies as their age. Paul has fewer teddies than John and the child aged 3 has two teddies. Paul is the youngest.

Can you determine who has which teddies?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - March 29 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 11:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - March 29

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 11:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Raku
   Flip the tiles back to blue in as few moves as possible!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

March 30, 1981: President Reagan shot

This Day in History - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 11:00pm

On March 30, 1981, President Ronald Reagan is shot in the chest outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by a deranged drifter named John Hinckley Jr.

The president had just finished addressing a labor meeting at the Washington Hilton Hotel and was walking with his entourage to his limousine when Hinckley, standing among a group of reporters, fired six shots at the president, hitting Reagan and three of his attendants. White House Press Secretary James Brady was shot in the head and critically wounded, Secret Service agent Timothy McCarthy was shot in the side, and District of Columbia policeman Thomas Delahaney was shot in the neck. After firing the shots, Hinckley was overpowered and pinned against a wall, and President Reagan, apparently unaware that he’d been shot, was shoved into his limousine by a Secret Service agent and rushed to the hospital.

The president was shot in the left lung, and the .22 caliber bullet just missed his heart. In an impressive feat for a 70-year-old man with a collapsed lung, he walked into George Washington University Hospital under his own power. As he was treated and prepared for surgery, he was in good spirits and quipped to his wife, Nancy, ”Honey, I forgot to duck,” and to his surgeons, “Please tell me you’re Republicans.” Reagan’s surgery lasted two hours, and he was listed in stable and good condition afterward.

The next day, the president resumed some of his executive duties and signed a piece of legislation from his hospital bed. On April 11, he returned to the White House. Reagan’s popularity soared after the assassination attempt, and at the end of April he was given a hero’s welcome by Congress. In August, this same Congress passed his controversial economic program, with several Democrats breaking ranks to back Reagan’s plan. By this time, Reagan claimed to be fully recovered from the assassination attempt. In private, however, he would continue to feel the effects of the nearly fatal gunshot wound for years.

Of the victims of the assassination attempt, Secret Service agent Timothy McCarthy and D.C. policeman Thomas Delahaney eventually recovered. James Brady, who nearly died after being shot in the eye, suffered permanent brain damage. He later became an advocate of gun control, and in 1993 Congress passed the “Brady Bill,” which established a five-day waiting period and background checks for prospective gun buyers. President Bill Clinton signed the bill into law.

After being arrested on March 30, 1981, 25-year-old John Hinckley was booked on federal charges of attempting to assassinate the president. He had previously been arrested in Tennessee on weapons charges. In June 1982, he was found not guilty by reason of insanity. In the trial, Hinckley’s defense attorneys argued that their client was ill with narcissistic personality disorder, citing medical evidence, and had a pathological obsession with the 1976 film Taxi Driver, in which the main character attempts to assassinate a fictional senator. His lawyers claimed that Hinckley saw the movie more than a dozen times, was obsessed with the lead actress, Jodie Foster, and had attempted to reenact the events of the film in his own life. Thus the movie, not Hinckley, they argued, was the actual planning force behind the events that occurred on March 30, 1981.

The verdict of “not guilty by reason of insanity” aroused widespread public criticism, and many were shocked that a would-be presidential assassin could avoid been held accountable for his crime. However, because of his obvious threat to society, he was placed in St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, a mental institution. In the late 1990s, Hinckley’s attorney began arguing that his mental illness was in remission and thus had a right to return to a normal life. Beginning in August 1999, he was allowed supervised day trips off the hospital grounds and later was allowed to visit his parents once a week unsupervised. The Secret Service voluntarily monitors him during these outings. If his mental illness remains in remission, he may one day be released.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Edward Gibbon

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 7:00pm
"Unprovided with original learning, unformed in the habits of thinking, unskilled in the arts of composition, I resolved to write a book."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Robert Benchley

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 7:00pm
"Drinking makes such fools of people, and people are such fools to begin with, that it's compounding a felony."
Categories: Fun Stuff

W. Somerset Maugham

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 7:00pm
"It was such a lovely day I thought it a pity to get up."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Albert Einstein

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 7:00pm
"Before God we are all equally wise - and equally foolish."
Categories: Fun Stuff

discomfit

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 03/29/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for March 29, 2015 is:

discomfit • \diss-KUM-fit\  • verb
1 : to frustrate the plans of : thwart 2 : to put into a state of perplexity and embarrassment : disconcert

Examples:
Jacob was discomfited by his curious young son's forward, probing questions.

"For more than two decades, the work of this British artist has dazzled and discomfited, seduced and unsettled, gliding effortlessly between high and low, among cultures, ricocheting off different racial stereotypes and religious beliefs." — Roberta Smith, New York Times, October 31, 2014

Did you know?
Disconcerted by discomfit and discomfort? Here's a little usage history that might help. Several usage commentators have, in the past, tried to convince their readers that discomfit means "to rout" or "to completely defeat" and not "to discomfort, embarrass, or make uneasy." In its earliest uses discomfit did in fact mean "to defeat in battle," but that sense is now rare, and the extended sense, "to thwart," is also uncommon. Most of the recent commentaries agree that the sense "to discomfort or disconcert" has become thoroughly established and is the most prevalent meaning of the word. There is one major difference between discomfit and discomfort, though—discomfit is used almost exclusively as a verb, while discomfort is much more commonly used as a noun than a verb.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - March 28

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 03/28/2015 - 11:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What number comes next in this sequence:

917452 97452 9745 975 ==?==

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - March 28 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 03/28/2015 - 11:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - March 28

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 03/28/2015 - 11:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Diamond Detonation
   Use the arrow keys to move your character around the crazy jewel mine maze picking up gems.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

March 29, 1973: U.S. withdraws from Vietnam

This Day in History - Sat, 03/28/2015 - 11:00pm

Two months after the signing of the Vietnam peace agreement, the last U.S. combat troops leave South Vietnam as Hanoi frees the remaining American prisoners of war held in North Vietnam. America’s direct eight-year intervention in the Vietnam War was at an end. In Saigon, some 7,000 U.S. Department of Defense civilian employees remained behind to aid South Vietnam in conducting what looked to be a fierce and ongoing war with communist North Vietnam.

In 1961, after two decades of indirect military aid, U.S. President John F. Kennedy sent the first large force of U.S. military personnel to Vietnam to bolster the ineffectual autocratic regime of South Vietnam against the communist North. Three years later, with the South Vietnamese government crumbling, President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered limited bombing raids on North Vietnam, and Congress authorized the use of U.S. troops. By 1965, North Vietnamese offensives left President Johnson with two choices: escalate U.S. involvement or withdraw. Johnson ordered the former, and troop levels soon jumped to more than 300,000 as U.S. air forces commenced the largest bombing campaign in history.

During the next few years, the extended length of the war, the high number of U.S. casualties, and the exposure of U.S. involvement in war crimes, such as the massacre at My Lai, helped turn many in the United States against the Vietnam War. The communists’ Tet Offensive of 1968 crushed U.S. hopes of an imminent end to the conflict and galvanized U.S. opposition to the war. In response, Johnson announced in March 1968 that he would not seek reelection, citing what he perceived to be his responsibility in creating a perilous national division over Vietnam. He also authorized the beginning of peace talks.

In the spring of 1969, as protests against the war escalated in the United States, U.S. troop strength in the war-torn country reached its peak at nearly 550,000 men. Richard Nixon, the new U.S. president, began U.S. troop withdrawal and “Vietnamization” of the war effort that year, but he intensified bombing. Large U.S. troop withdrawals continued in the early 1970s as President Nixon expanded air and ground operations into Cambodia and Laos in attempts to block enemy supply routes along Vietnam’s borders. This expansion of the war, which accomplished few positive results, led to new waves of protests in the United States and elsewhere.

Finally, in January 1973, representatives of the United States, North and South Vietnam, and the Vietcong signed a peace agreement in Paris, ending the direct U.S. military involvement in the Vietnam War. Its key provisions included a cease-fire throughout Vietnam, the withdrawal of U.S. forces, the release of prisoners of war, and the reunification of North and South Vietnam through peaceful means. The South Vietnamese government was to remain in place until new elections were held, and North Vietnamese forces in the South were not to advance further nor be reinforced.

In reality, however, the agreement was little more than a face-saving gesture by the U.S. government. Even before the last American troops departed on March 29, the communists violated the cease-fire, and by early 1974 full-scale war had resumed. At the end of 1974, South Vietnamese authorities reported that 80,000 of their soldiers and civilians had been killed in fighting during the year, making it the most costly of the Vietnam War.

On April 30, 1975, the last few Americans still in South Vietnam were airlifted out of the country as Saigon fell to communist forces. North Vietnamese Colonel Bui Tin, accepting the surrender of South Vietnam later in the day, remarked, “You have nothing to fear; between Vietnamese there are no victors and no vanquished. Only the Americans have been defeated.” The Vietnam War was the longest and most unpopular foreign war in U.S. history and cost 58,000 American lives. As many as two million Vietnamese soldiers and civilians were killed.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Susan Rice

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 03/28/2015 - 7:00pm
"Once you've learned to study in a bathing suit on the grass with muscled men throwing frisbees over your head, you can accomplish almost anything."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Henry David Thoreau

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 03/28/2015 - 7:00pm
"How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live."
Categories: Fun Stuff