Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 31

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 27 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Below you will find well-known eight letter words, with only their endings remaining. Can you determine the words?

.....RUE
.....JAR
.....DIL
.....ANY
.....POX
.....GTH
.....ELF
.....OIA
.....IGE
.....HOG
.....TOO
.....DIX
.....FIN
.....UPT

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 31 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 27 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 31

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 27 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Crazy Maze
   Can you move your pointer around this crazy maze?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 27 min ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

adduce

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - 17 hours 37 min ago

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 31, 2014 is:

adduce • \uh-DOOSS\  • verb
: to offer as example, reason, or proof in discussion or analysis

Examples:
"The arguments she had adduced rang true." — Agatha Christie, The Secret Adversary, 1922

"Morris asserts that productive war makes governments, which in turn ensure peace and prosperity. He adduces the Roman Empire as his prime example." — Alan Cate, Plain Dealer (Cleveland, OH), April 27, 2014

Did you know?
We won't lead you astray over the history of adduce; it is one of a plethora of familiar words that trace to the Latin root ducere, which means "to lead." Perhaps we can induce you to deduce a few other ducere offspring if we offer a few hints about them. One is a synonym of kidnap, one's a title for a British royal, and one's another word for decrease. Give up? They are abduct, duke, and reduce, respectively. There are also many others, including induce, which means "to persuade" or "to bring about."

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 31, 1517: Martin Luther posts 95 theses

This Day in History - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1517, the priest and scholar Martin Luther approaches the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, and nails a piece of paper to it containing the 95 revolutionary opinions that would begin the Protestant Reformation.

In his theses, Luther condemned the excesses and corruption of the Roman Catholic Church, especially the papal practice of asking payment—called "indulgences"—for the forgiveness of sins. At the time, a Dominican priest named Johann Tetzel, commissioned by the Archbishop of Mainz and Pope Leo X, was in the midst of a major fundraising campaign in Germany to finance the renovation of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Though Prince Frederick III the Wise had banned the sale of indulgences in Wittenberg, many church members traveled to purchase them. When they returned, they showed the pardons they had bought to Luther, claiming they no longer had to repent for their sins.

Luther's frustration with this practice led him to write the 95 Theses, which were quickly snapped up, translated from Latin into German and distributed widely. A copy made its way to Rome, and efforts began to convince Luther to change his tune. He refused to keep silent, however, and in 1521 Pope Leo X formally excommunicated Luther from the Catholic Church. That same year, Luther again refused to recant his writings before the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V of Germany, who issued the famous Edict of Worms declaring Luther an outlaw and a heretic and giving permission for anyone to kill him without consequence. Protected by Prince Frederick, Luther began working on a German translation of the Bible, a task that took 10 years to complete.

The term "Protestant" first appeared in 1529, when Charles V revoked a provision that allowed the ruler of each German state to choose whether they would enforce the Edict of Worms. A number of princes and other supporters of Luther issued a protest, declaring that their allegiance to God trumped their allegiance to the emperor. They became known to their opponents as Protestants; gradually this name came to apply to all who believed the Church should be reformed, even those outside Germany. By the time Luther died, of natural causes, in 1546, his revolutionary beliefs had formed the basis for the Protestant Reformation, which would over the next three centuries revolutionize Western civilization.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 30

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 8:59pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What letter is missing from this sequence:

A A A A ==?== A A A A A A

Note: the answer is not A.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 30 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 8:59pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 30

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 8:59pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Hop To The Top
   Jump your way from bubble to bubble to work your way to the top.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Sally Kempton

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 7:00pm
"I became a feminist as an alternative to becoming a masochist."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Will Rogers

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 7:00pm
"Ancient Rome declined because it had a Senate; now what's going to happen to us with both a Senate and a House?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Robert Byrne

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 7:00pm
"Everything is in a state of flux, including the status quo."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Dean Martin

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 7:00pm
"If you drink, don't drive. Don't even putt."
Categories: Fun Stuff

collywobbles

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 30, 2014 is:

collywobbles • \KAH-lee-wah-bulz\  • noun
: pain in the abdomen and especially in the stomach : bellyache

Examples:
"It's no wonder you've got the collywobbles," said Ruth to her niece, "given the amount of Halloween candy you ate last night!"

"But even the hint of closing this cherished window into Detroit's past gives loyal museumgoers the collywobbles." — Joy Hakanson Colby, The Detroit News, December 30, 2005

Did you know?
We don't know who first clutched his or her tummy and called the affliction "collywobbles," but we do know the word's earliest print appearance dates from around 1823. We also know that the word probably came about through a process called "folk etymology." In that process, unusual words are transformed to make them look or sound like other, more familiar words. Collywobbles is believed to be a friendlier-sounding transformation of cholera morbus (the New Latin term for the disease cholera) that was influenced by the words colic and wobble.

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 30, 1938: Welles scares nation

This Day in History - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 11:00pm

Orson Welles causes a nationwide panic with his broadcast of "War of the Worlds"—a realistic radio dramatization of a Martian invasion of Earth.

Orson Welles was only 23 years old when his Mercury Theater company decided to update H.G. Wells' 19th-century science fiction novel War of the Worlds for national radio. Despite his age, Welles had been in radio for several years, most notably as the voice of "The Shadow" in the hit mystery program of the same name. "War of the Worlds" was not planned as a radio hoax, and Welles had little idea of the havoc it would cause.

The show began on Sunday, October 30, at 8 p.m. A voice announced: "The Columbia Broadcasting System and its affiliated stations present Orson Welles and the Mercury Theater on the air in 'War of the Worlds' by H.G. Wells."

Sunday evening in 1938 was prime-time in the golden age of radio, and millions of Americans had their radios turned on. But most of these Americans were listening to ventriloquist Edgar Bergen and his dummy "Charlie McCarthy" on NBC and only turned to CBS at 8:12 p.m. after the comedy sketch ended and a little-known singer went on. By then, the story of the Martian invasion was well underway.

Welles introduced his radio play with a spoken introduction, followed by an announcer reading a weather report. Then, seemingly abandoning the storyline, the announcer took listeners to "the Meridian Room in the Hotel Park Plaza in downtown New York, where you will be entertained by the music of Ramon Raquello and his orchestra." Putrid dance music played for some time, and then the scare began. An announcer broke in to report that "Professor Farrell of the Mount Jenning Observatory" had detected explosions on the planet Mars. Then the dance music came back on, followed by another interruption in which listeners were informed that a large meteor had crashed into a farmer's field in Grovers Mills, New Jersey.

Soon, an announcer was at the crash site describing a Martian emerging from a large metallic cylinder. "Good heavens," he declared, "something's wriggling out of the shadow like a gray snake. Now here's another and another one and another one. They look like tentacles to me ... I can see the thing's body now. It's large, large as a bear. It glistens like wet leather. But that face, it... it ... ladies and gentlemen, it's indescribable. I can hardly force myself to keep looking at it, it's so awful. The eyes are black and gleam like a serpent. The mouth is kind of V-shaped with saliva dripping from its rimless lips that seem to quiver and pulsate."

The Martians mounted walking war machines and fired "heat-ray" weapons at the puny humans gathered around the crash site. They annihilated a force of 7,000 National Guardsman, and after being attacked by artillery and bombers the Martians released a poisonous gas into the air. Soon "Martian cylinders" landed in Chicago and St. Louis. The radio play was extremely realistic, with Welles employing sophisticated sound effects and his actors doing an excellent job portraying terrified announcers and other characters. An announcer reported that widespread panic had broken out in the vicinity of the landing sites, with thousands desperately trying to flee. In fact, that was not far from the truth.

Perhaps as many as a million radio listeners believed that a real Martian invasion was underway. Panic broke out across the country. In New Jersey, terrified civilians jammed highways seeking to escape the alien marauders. People begged police for gas masks to save them from the toxic gas and asked electric companies to turn off the power so that the Martians wouldn't see their lights. One woman ran into an Indianapolis church where evening services were being held and yelled, "New York has been destroyed! It's the end of the world! Go home and prepare to die!"

When news of the real-life panic leaked into the CBS studio, Welles went on the air as himself to remind listeners that it was just fiction. There were rumors that the show caused suicides, but none were ever confirmed.

The Federal Communications Commission investigated the program but found no law was broken. Networks did agree to be more cautious in their programming in the future. Orson Welles feared that the controversy generated by "War of the Worlds" would ruin his career. In fact, the publicity helped land him a contract with a Hollywood studio, and in 1941 he directed, wrote, produced, and starred in Citizen Kane—a movie that many have called the greatest American film ever made.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 29

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:45pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

In a football syndicate, the winnings amounted to £7,657.

There were more than 30 people in the syndicate but fewer than 100.

Each won exactly the same number of pounds and no pence were involved.

How much did each win?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 29 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:45pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 29

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 8:45pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Mini Racing
   Race your Mini around the mini track.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka and Toshihiro Kawabata

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"Exercise relieves stress. Nothing relieves exercise."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Henry Adams

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"No one means all he says, and yet very few say all they mean, for words are slippery and thought is viscous."
Categories: Fun Stuff