Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 30

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 2 hours 22 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Three men, Alan, Brian, Charles and their respective wives, Ada, Betty and Cathy, were hunting in deepest Peru, when they came across a large river.

Luckily there was one boat, however, it could only carry two people at the same time.

Due to bitter jealousy, no woman could be left with another man unless her husband was present.

How did they manage to cross the river?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 30 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 2 hours 22 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 30

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 2 hours 22 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Techno Bounce
   Keep the ball bouncing with the three blocks.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 2 hours 22 min ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

cap-a-pie

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - 14 hours 16 min ago

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 30, 2014 is:

cap-a-pie • \kap-uh-PEE\  • adverb
: from head to foot

Examples:
The birthday girl—dressed cap-a-pie as a princess, from tiara to sequined slippers—waited excitedly for her guests to arrive.

"It's only in cartoons that crows have yellow beaks and feet. They are of one shade cap-a-pie, black as midnight and fleet of wing." — M. D. Harmon, Portland Press Herald (Maine), January 5, 2004

Did you know?
Think of a medieval knight riding off to battle completely encased (from head to foot, as it were) in armor. Knights thus outfitted were said to be "armed cap-a-pie." The term cap-a-pie, which has been used in English since at least the 16th century, descends from the Middle French phrase de cap a pé, meaning "from head to foot." Nowadays, it is generally extended to more figurative armor, as in "armed cap-a-pie against criticism." Cap-a-pie has also been credited with parenting another English phrase. Some people think the expression "apple-pie order," meaning "perfect order," may have originated as a corruption of "cap-a-pie order." The evidence for that theory is far from orderly, however, and it must be regarded as speculative.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 30, 1967: Thurgood Marshall confirmed as Supreme Court justice

This Day in History - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1967, Thurgood Marshall becomes the first African American to be confirmed as a Supreme Court justice. He would remain on the Supreme Court for 24 years before retiring for health reasons, leaving a legacy of upholding the rights of the individual as guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

From a young age, Marshall seemed destined for a place in the American justice system. His parents instilled in him an appreciation for the Constitution, a feeling that was reinforced by his schoolteachers, who forced him to read the document as punishment for his misbehavior. After graduating from Lincoln University in 1930, Marshall sought admission to the University of Maryland School of Law, but was turned away because of the school's segregation policy, which effectively forbade blacks from studying with whites. Instead, Marshall attended Howard University Law School, from which he graduated magna cum laude in 1933. (Marshall later successfully sued Maryland School of Law for their unfair admissions policy.)

Setting up a private practice in his home state of Maryland, Marshall quickly established a reputation as a lawyer for the "little man." In a year's time, he began working with the Baltimore NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), and went on to become the organization’s chief counsel by the time he was 32, in 1940. Over the next two decades, Marshall distinguished himself as one of the country's leading advocates for individual rights, winning 29 of the 32 cases he argued in front of the Supreme Court, all of which challenged in some way the 'separate but equal' doctrine that had been established by the landmark case Plessy v. Ferguson (1896). The high-water mark of Marshall's career as a litigator came in 1954 with his victory in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. In that case, Marshall argued that the 'separate but equal' principle was unconstitutional, and designed to keep blacks "as near [slavery] as possible."

In 1961, Marshall was appointed by then-President John F. Kennedy to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, a position he held until 1965, when Kennedy's successor, Lyndon B. Johnson, named him solicitor general. Following the retirement of Justice Tom Clark in 1967, President Johnson appointed Marshall to the Supreme Court, a decision confirmed by the Senate with a 69-11 vote. Over the next 24 years, Justice Marshall came out in favor of abortion rights and against the death penalty, as he continued his tireless commitment to ensuring equitable treatment of individuals--particularly minorities--by state and federal governments.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Gregory Thomas Garcia, Elijah Aron, Jordan Young

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"They wouldn't call it falling in love if you didn't get hurt sometimes, but you just pick yourself up and move on."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Malcolm Forbes

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"It's so much easier to suggest solutions when you don't know too much about the problem."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Franklin P. Jones

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"Honest criticism is hard to take, particularly from a relative, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"It is a very sad thing that nowadays there is so little useless information."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 29

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:43pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

I was recently given a new watch for my birthday.

However, as usual with my presents, it was quite useless as it loses 6 minutes every hour.

I set it using my friend's accurate watch at midnight and it now shows 10.39am.

I know that the watch stopped 21 minutes ago so what is the correct time now?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 29 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:43pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 29

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 6:43pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Moon Cave
   Guide your little ship around the caves collecting fuel along the way.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

precocial

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 29, 2014 is:

precocial • \prih-KOH-shul\  • adjective
: capable of a high degree of independent activity from birth

Examples:
The mallard is a type of precocial bird that can often fly independently just 24 hours after hatching.

"Hares are like deer, horses and cattle in the sense that their offspring are precocial. They still have multiple offspring per pregnancy, but they are born fully furred with their eyes open." — Bill Danielson, The Recorder (Greenfield, Massachusetts), June 26, 2014

Did you know?
Precocial and its partner altricial are really for the birds. Well, at least they are often used to describe the young of our feathered friends. The chicks of precocial birds can see as soon as they hatch and generally have strong legs and a body covered with fine down. Those are attributes you would expect in birds described by the word precocial, which traces to the Latin precox, a term that means "precocious" or "early ripening" (yes, that root also gave us the word "precocious"). Ducks, geese, ostriches, pheasants, and quail are among the birds that hatch precocial offspring. Altricial chicks, on the other hand, are basically featherless and helpless at birth and require days or weeks of parental care before becoming independent.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 29, 2005: Hurricane Katrina slams into Gulf Coast

This Day in History - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 11:00pm

Hurricane Katrina makes landfall near New Orleans, Louisiana, as a Category 4 hurricane on this day in 2005. Despite being only the third most powerful storm of the 2005 hurricane season, Katrina was the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States. After briefly coming ashore in southern Florida on August 25 as a Category 1 hurricane, Katrina gained strength before slamming into the Gulf Coast on August 29. In addition to bringing devastation to the New Orleans area, the hurricane caused damage along the coasts of Mississippi and Alabama, as well as other parts of Louisiana.

New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin ordered a mandatory evacuation of the city on August 28, when Katrina briefly achieved Category 5 status and the National Weather Service predicted "devastating" damage to the area. But an estimated 150,000 people, who either did not want to or did not have the resources to leave, ignored the order and stayed behind. The storm brought sustained winds of 145 miles per hour, which cut power lines and destroyed homes, even turning cars into projectile missiles. Katrina caused record storm surges all along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The surges overwhelmed the levees that protected New Orleans, located at six feet below sea level, from Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi River. Soon, 80 percent of the city was flooded up to the rooftops of many homes and small buildings.

Tens of thousands of people sought shelter in the New Orleans Convention Center and the Louisiana Superdome. The situation in both places quickly deteriorated, as food and water ran low and conditions became unsanitary. Frustration mounted as it took up to two days for a full-scale relief effort to begin. In the meantime, the stranded residents suffered from heat, hunger, and a lack of medical care. Reports of looting, rape, and even murder began to surface. As news networks broadcast scenes from the devastated city to the world, it became obvious that a vast majority of the victims were African-American and poor, leading to difficult questions among the public about the state of racial equality in the United States. The federal government and President George W. Bush were roundly criticized for what was perceived as their slow response to the disaster. The head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Michael Brown, resigned amid the ensuing controversy.

Finally, on September 1, the tens of thousands of people staying in the damaged Superdome and Convention Center begin to be moved to the Astrodome in Houston, Texas, and another mandatory evacuation order was issued for the city. The next day, military convoys arrived with supplies and the National Guard was brought in to bring a halt to lawlessness. Efforts began to collect and identify corpses. On September 6, eight days after the hurricane, the Army Corps of Engineers finally completed temporary repairs to the three major holes in New Orleans' levee system and were able to begin pumping water out of the city.

In all, it is believed that the hurricane caused more than 1,300 deaths and up to $150 billion in damages to both private property and public infrastructure. It is estimated that only about $40 billion of that number will be covered by insurance. One million people were displaced by the disaster, a phenomenon unseen in the United States since the Great Depression. Four hundred thousand people lost their jobs as a result of the disaster. Offers of international aid poured in from around the world, even from poor countries like Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Private donations from U.S. citizens alone approached $600 million.

The storm also set off 36 tornadoes in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, resulting in one death.

President Bush declared September 16 a national day of remembrance for the victims of Hurricane Katrina.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Henny Youngman

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"I once wanted to become an atheist, but I gave up - they have no holidays."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Frederick Locker-Lampson

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"The world's as ugly as sin, and almost as delightful"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Adrian Mitchell

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"Most people ignore most poetry / because / most poetry ignores most people."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Marquis de Flers Robert and Arman de Caillavet

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"Democracy is the name we give the people whenever we need them."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 28

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 6:29pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What are the next three in this sequence:

2 1 F 1 1 F 0 1 F 9 F ==?==

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff