Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 5

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 59 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

If you turn a right handed glove inside out, will it be still be a right handed glove or will it now be a left handed one?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 5 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 59 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 5

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 59 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Phage Wars
   Spread your parasites in this fast paced strategy game.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 3 hours 59 min ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

bunkum

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - 18 hours 57 min ago

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 05, 2015 is:

bunkum • \BUNG-kum\  • noun
: insincere or foolish talk : nonsense

Examples:
I hesitated to voice my opinions, fearful that my companions would deride my views as bunkum.

"The now-discredited study got headlines because it offered hope. It seemed to prove that our sense of empathy … could overcome prejudice and bridge seemingly irreconcilable differences. It was heartwarming, and it was utter bunkum." — Charles Seife, Los Angeles Times, May 28, 2015

Did you know?
Some words in our language have more colorful histories than others, but in the case of bunkum, you could almost say it was an act of Congress that brought the word into being. Back in 1820 Felix Walker, who represented Buncombe County, North Carolina, in the U.S. House of Representatives, was determined that his voice be heard on his constituents' behalf, even though the matter up for debate was irrelevant to Walker's district and he had little to contribute. To the exasperation of his colleagues, Walker insisted on delivering a long and wearisome "speech for Buncombe." His persistent—if insignificant—harangue made buncombe (later respelled bunkum) a synonym for meaningless political claptrap and later for any kind of nonsense.

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 05, 1946: Bikini introduced

This Day in History - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 11:00pm

On July 5, 1946, French designer Louis Reard unveils a daring two-piece swimsuit at the Piscine Molitor, a popular swimming pool in Paris. Parisian showgirl Micheline Bernardini modeled the new fashion, which Reard dubbed “bikini,” inspired by a news-making U.S. atomic test that took place off the Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean earlier that week.

European women first began wearing two-piece bathing suits that consisted of a halter top and shorts in the 1930s, but only a sliver of the midriff was revealed and the navel was vigilantly covered. In the United States, the modest two-piece made its appearance during World War II, when wartime rationing of fabric saw the removal of the skirt panel and other superfluous material. Meanwhile, in Europe, fortified coastlines and Allied invasions curtailed beach life during the war, and swimsuit development, like everything else non-military, came to a standstill.

In 1946, Western Europeans joyously greeted the first war-free summer in years, and French designers came up with fashions to match the liberated mood of the people. Two French designers, Jacques Heim and Louis Reard, developed competing prototypes of the bikini. Heim called his the “atom” and advertised it as “the world’s smallest bathing suit.” Reard’s swimsuit, which was basically a bra top and two inverted triangles of cloth connected by string, was in fact significantly smaller. Made out of a scant 30 inches of fabric, Reard promoted his creation as “smaller than the world’s smallest bathing suit.” Reard called his creation the bikini, named after the Bikini Atoll.

In planning the debut of his new swimsuit, Reard had trouble finding a professional model who would deign to wear the scandalously skimpy two-piece. So he turned to Micheline Bernardini, an exotic dancer at the Casino de Paris, who had no qualms about appearing nearly nude in public. As an allusion to the headlines that he knew his swimsuit would generate, he printed newspaper type across the suit that Bernardini modeled on July 5 at the Piscine Molitor. The bikini was a hit, especially among men, and Bernardini received some 50,000 fan letters.

Before long, bold young women in bikinis were causing a sensation along the Mediterranean coast. Spain and Italy passed measures prohibiting bikinis on public beaches but later capitulated to the changing times when the swimsuit grew into a mainstay of European beaches in the 1950s. Reard’s business soared, and in advertisements he kept the bikini mystique alive by declaring that a two-piece suit wasn’t a genuine bikini “unless it could be pulled through a wedding ring.”

In prudish America, the bikini was successfully resisted until the early 1960s, when a new emphasis on youthful liberation brought the swimsuit en masse to U.S. beaches. It was immortalized by the pop singer Brian Hyland, who sang “Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini” in 1960, by the teenage “beach blanket” movies of Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon, and by the California surfing culture celebrated by rock groups like the Beach Boys. Since then, the popularity of the bikini has only continued to grow.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 4

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 9:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find three words which contain two consecutive i's.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 4 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 9:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 4

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 9:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Kick The Block
   Cut objects and kick the red blocks off the screen.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Frank Lloyd Wright

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 7:00pm
"Tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Hermann Hesse

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 7:00pm
"When dealing with the insane, the best method is to pretend to be sane."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Woody Allen

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 7:00pm
"Eternal nothingness is fine if you happen to be dressed for it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Lewis B. Frumkes

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 7:00pm
"How to Raise your I.Q. by Eating Gifted Children"
Categories: Fun Stuff

stringent

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 04, 2015 is:

stringent • \STRIN-junt\  • adjective
1 : tight, constricted 2 : marked by rigor, strictness, or severity 3 : marked by money scarcity and credit strictness

Examples:
Brandon and Sarah had to adjust to living on a stringent budget during the four months when Brandon was looking for a job.

"In an effort to address the perils of climate change, the county supervisors voted 3–2 to adopt the most stringent greenhouse-gas-emission restrictions of any county in California…." — Nick Welsh, Santa Barbara (California) Independent, May 21, 2015

Did you know?
Words that are synonymous with stringent include rigid, which implies uncompromising inflexibility ("rigid rules of conduct"), and rigorous, which suggests hardship and difficulty ("the rigorous training of firefighters"). Also closely related is strict, which emphasizes undeviating conformity to rules, standards, or requirements ("strict enforcement of the law"). Stringent usually involves severe, tight restrictions or limitations ("the college has stringent admissions rules"). That's logical. After all, rigorous and rigid are both derived from rigēre, the Latin word meaning "to be stiff," and stringent and strict developed from the Latin verb stringere, meaning "to bind tight."

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 04, 1776: U.S. declares independence

This Day in History - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 11:00pm

In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Continental Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence, which proclaims the independence of the United States of America from Great Britain and its king. The declaration came 442 days after the first volleys of the American Revolution were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts and marked an ideological expansion of the conflict that would eventually encourage France’s intervention on behalf of the Patriots.

The first major American opposition to British policy came in 1765 after Parliament passed the Stamp Act, a taxation measure to raise revenues for a standing British army in America. Under the banner of “no taxation without representation,” colonists convened the Stamp Act Congress in October 1765 to vocalize their opposition to the tax. With its enactment in November, most colonists called for a boycott of British goods, and some organized attacks on the customhouses and homes of tax collectors. After months of protest in the colonies, Parliament voted to repeal the Stamp Act in March 1766.

Most colonists continued to quietly accept British rule until Parliament’s enactment of the Tea Act in 1773, a bill designed to save the faltering East India Company by greatly lowering its tea tax and granting it a monopoly on the American tea trade. The low tax allowed the East India Company to undercut even tea smuggled into America by Dutch traders, and many colonists viewed the act as another example of taxation tyranny. In response, militant Patriots in Massachusetts organized the “Boston Tea Party,” which saw British tea valued at some 18,000 pounds dumped into Boston Harbor.

Parliament, outraged by the Boston Tea Party and other blatant acts of destruction of British property, enacted the Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, in 1774. The Coercive Acts closed Boston to merchant shipping, established formal British military rule in Massachusetts, made British officials immune to criminal prosecution in America, and required colonists to quarter British troops. The colonists subsequently called the first Continental Congress to consider a united American resistance to the British.

With the other colonies watching intently, Massachusetts led the resistance to the British, forming a shadow revolutionary government and establishing militias to resist the increasing British military presence across the colony. In April 1775, Thomas Gage, the British governor of Massachusetts, ordered British troops to march to Concord, Massachusetts, where a Patriot arsenal was known to be located. On April 19, 1775, the British regulars encountered a group of American militiamen at Lexington, and the first shots of the American Revolution were fired.

Initially, both the Americans and the British saw the conflict as a kind of civil war within the British Empire: To King George III it was a colonial rebellion, and to the Americans it was a struggle for their rights as British citizens. However, Parliament remained unwilling to negotiate with the American rebels and instead purchased German mercenaries to help the British army crush the rebellion. In response to Britain’s continued opposition to reform, the Continental Congress began to pass measures abolishing British authority in the colonies.

In January 1776, Thomas Paine published Common Sense, an influential political pamphlet that convincingly argued for American independence and sold more than 500,000 copies in a few months. In the spring of 1776, support for independence swept the colonies, the Continental Congress called for states to form their own governments, and a five-man committee was assigned to draft a declaration.

The Declaration of Independence was largely the work of Virginian Thomas Jefferson. In justifying American independence, Jefferson drew generously from the political philosophy of John Locke, an advocate of natural rights, and from the work of other English theorists. The first section features the famous lines, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The second part presents a long list of grievances that provided the rationale for rebellion.

On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted to approve a Virginia motion calling for separation from Britain. The dramatic words of this resolution were added to the closing of the Declaration of Independence. Two days later, on July 4, the declaration was formally adopted by 12 colonies after minor revision. New York approved it on July 19. On August 2, the declaration was signed.

The American War for Independence would last for five more years. Yet to come were the Patriot triumphs at Saratoga, the bitter winter at Valley Forge, the intervention of the French, and the final victory at Yorktown in 1781. In 1783, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris with Britain, the United States formally became a free and independent nation.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 3

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 9:34pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

I am compiling the new BrainBashers world almanac and it now contains lots more pages.

I know that it takes 333 digits to print the page numbers in sequence. How many numbered pages does the book have and how many times does the number 3 appear?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 3 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 9:34pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 3

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 9:34pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Egg Catcher
   Catch all of the eggs as they fall from the chickens.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Stephen Jay Gould

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 7:00pm
"In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal time in physics classrooms."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Frank Zappa

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/03/2015 - 7:00pm
"In the fight between you and the world, back the world."
Categories: Fun Stuff