Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - September 28

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 7:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Mary needed 400ml of vegetable stock for a recipe she was following.

However the only measuring containers she had were 300ml and 500ml.

How can she measure out exactly 400ml?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - September 28 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 7:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - September 28

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 7:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Trapped
   You are trapped in a fiendish maze. Can you escape by solving the puzzles?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Thomas Mann

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"No man remains quite what he was when he recognizes himself."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Douglas Adams

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"He felt that his whole life was some kind of dream and he sometimes wondered whose it was and whether they were enjoying it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Willie Tyler

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"The reason lightning doesn't strike twice in the same place is that the same place isn't there the second time."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Laurence J. Peter

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"Competence, like truth, beauty and contact lenses, is in the eye of the beholder."
Categories: Fun Stuff

sotto voce

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 28, 2014 is:

sotto voce • \sah-toh-VOH-chee\  • adverb or adjective
1 : under the breath : in an undertone; also : in a private manner 2 : very softly — used as a direction in music

Examples:
As her husband headed into the kitchen, our hostess began telling us sotto voce about the upcoming surprise party for him.

"Former Virginia governor Robert F. McDonnell had just explained, with a heart-breaking letter and a sotto voce delivery, that his marriage was in shambles." — Laura Vozzella, Matt Zapotosky, and Rosalind S. Helderman, The Washington Post, August 23, 2014

Did you know?
It’s no secret: in our first example sentence, sotto voce functions as an adverb, modifying the verb tell. But sotto voce, which was borrowed into English from the Italian word sottovoce (literally meaning "under the voice"), can also serve as an adjective. That’s the role it plays in our second example sentence. The adverb sense first appeared in English in the 18th century and soon afterward found use in musical directions calling for whispered vocals. The adjective sense came about in the early 19th century.

Categories: Fun Stuff

September 28, 1941: Ted Williams becomes last player to hit .400

This Day in History - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1941, the Boston Red Sox's Ted Williams plays a double-header against the Philadelphia Athletics on the last day of the regular season and gets six hits in eight trips to the plate, to boost his batting average to .406 and become the first player since Bill Terry in 1930 to hit .400. Williams, who spent his entire career with the Sox, played his final game exactly 19 years later, on September 28, 1960, at Boston’s Fenway Park and hit a home run in his last time at bat, for a career total of 521 homeruns. 

Williams was born on August 30, 1918, in San Diego, and began his major league career with the Red Sox in 1939. 1941 marked Williams' best season. In addition to his .406 batting average--no major league player since him has hit .400--the left fielder led the league with 37 homers, 135 runs and had a slugging average of .735. Also that season, Williams, whose nicknames included "The Splendid Splinter" and "The Thumper," had an on-base percentage of .553, a record that remained unbroken for 61 years, until Barry Bonds achieved a percentage of .582 in 2002.

In 1942, Williams won the American League Triple Crown, for highest batting average and most RBIs and homeruns. He duplicated the feat in 1947. In 1946 and 1949, he was named the American League's Most Valuable Player and in June 1960, he became the fourth player in major league history to hit 500 homers. He was selected to the All-Star team 17 times.

Williams played his last game on September 28, 1960, and retired with a lifetime batting average of .344, a .483 career on-base percentage and 2,654 hits. His achievements are all the more impressive because his career was interrupted twice for military service: Williams was a Marine Corps pilot during World War II and the Korean War and as a result missed a total of nearly five seasons from baseball.

Williams, who was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966, managed the Washington Senators (renamed the Texas Rangers in 1972) from 1969 to 1972. In 1984, the Boston Red Sox retired his uniform number (nine). Williams died of cardiac arrest at age 83 on July 5, 2002, in Florida. In a controversial move, his son sent his father’s body to be frozen at a cryonics laboratory.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - September 27

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 7:23pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What word completes this square:

ferret   rabbit
otter    ==?==

Choose from: giraffe, mink, cow, bison.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - September 27 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 7:23pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - September 27

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 7:23pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Reaktor
   Enter the 8-sector reaktor zone where you match coloured zones.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Jack Handey

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 7:00pm
"I hope that when I die, people say about me, 'Boy, that guy sure owed me a lot of money.'"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Hector Berlioz

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 7:00pm
"Every composer knows the anguish and despair occasioned by forgetting ideas which one had no time to write down."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Charles M. Schulz

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 7:00pm
"Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Evelyn Waugh

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 7:00pm
"It is a curious thing... that every creed promises a paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for anyone of civilized taste."
Categories: Fun Stuff

fainéant

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 09/27/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 27, 2014 is:

fainéant • \fay-nay-AHN\  • adjective
: idle and ineffectual : indolent

Examples:
Deanna's parents warned her not to become fainéant during the summer; even if she didn't want to work, she should travel or volunteer somewhere.

"We go on, Beckett-like, enacting the rituals that define existence, trapped in an existential spiral, too fainéant to change, ... doomed to repeat the same mistakes and fall into the same situations." — David Krasner, A History of Modern Drama, 2011

Did you know?
You've probably guessed that fainéant was borrowed from French; it derives from fait-nient, which literally means "does nothing," and ultimately traces back to the verb faindre, or feindre, meaning "to feign." (The English word feign is also descended from this verb, as are faint and feint.) Fainéant first appeared in print in the early 17th century as a noun meaning "an irresponsible idler," and by 1854 it was also being used as an adjective. As its foreignness suggests, fainéant tends to be used when the context calls for a fancier or more elegant word than inactive or sluggish.

Categories: Fun Stuff

September 27, 1779: John Adams appointed to negotiate peace terms with British

This Day in History - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1779, the Continental Congress appoints John Adams to travel to France as minister plenipotentiary in charge of negotiating treaties of peace and commerce with Great Britain during the Revolutionary War.

Adams had traveled to Paris in 1778 to negotiate an alliance with France, but had been unceremoniously dismissed when Congress chose Benjamin Franklin as sole commissioner. Soon after returning to Massachusetts in mid-1779, Adams was elected as a delegate to the state convention to draw up a new constitution; he was involved in these duties when he learned of his new diplomatic commission. Accompanied by his young sons John Quincy and Charles, Adams sailed for Europe that November aboard the French ship Sensible, which sprang a leak early in the voyage and missed its original destination (Brest), instead landing at El Ferrol, in northwestern Spain. After an arduous journey by mule train across the Pyrenees and into France, Adams and his group reached Paris in early February 1780.

While in Paris, Adams wrote to Congress almost daily (sometimes several letters a day) sharing news about British politics, British and French naval activities and his general perspective on European affairs. Conditions were unfavorable for peace at the time, as the war was going badly for the Continental Army, and the blunt and sometimes confrontational Adams clashed with the French government, especially the powerful Foreign Minister Charles Gravier, Comte de Vergennes. In mid-June, Adams began a correspondence with Vergennes in which he pushed for French naval assistance, antagonizing both Vergennes and Franklin, who brought the matter to the attention of Congress.

By that time, Adams had departed France for Holland, where he was attempting to negotiate a loan from the Dutch. Before the end of the year, he was named American minister to the Netherlands, replacing Henry Laurens, who was captured at sea by the British. In June 1781, capitulating to pressure from Vergennes and other French diplomats, Congress acted to revoke Adams' sole powers as peacemaker with Britain, appointing Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Jay and Laurens to negotiate alongside him.

The tide of the war was turning in America's favor, and Adams returned to Paris in October 1782 to take up his part in the peace negotiations. As Jefferson didn't travel to Europe and Laurens was in failing health after his release from the Tower of London, it was left to Adams, Jay and Franklin to represent American interests. Adams and Jay both distrusted the French government (in contrast with Franklin), but their differences of opinion and diplomatic styles allowed the team to negotiate favorable terms in the Peace of Paris (1783). The following year, Jefferson arrived to take Adams' place as American minister to France, forming a lifelong bond with Adams and his family before the latter left to take up his new post as American ambassador to London and continue his distinguished record of foreign service on behalf of the new nation.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - September 26

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 7:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What is represented by this BrainBat?

TUNE TUNE TUNE TUNE

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - September 26 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 7:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff