Fun Stuff

Horace Walpole

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 11/23/2014 - 6:00pm
"Foolish writers and readers are created for each other."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Cato the Elder

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 11/23/2014 - 6:00pm
"After I'm dead I'd rather have people ask why I have no monument than why I have one."
Categories: Fun Stuff

recusant

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 11/23/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 23, 2014 is:

recusant • \REK-yuh-zunt\  • adjective
: refusing to submit to authority

Examples:
Elizabeth's recusant streak was apparent even in elementary school, where she would frequently challenge the rules put forth by her teachers.

"The third volume, covering the English Civil War and its aftermath, offers more of the same smoothly readable analysis.… Oliver Cromwell, with his Puritan grit and fear of recusant Catholicism, inevitably takes up much of the action." — Ian Thomson, The Independent (UK), October 22, 2014

Did you know?
In 1534, Henry VIII of England declared himself the head of the Church of England, separating it from the Roman Catholic Church, and the resultant furor led to increased attention on people's religious observances. A recusant was someone who (from about 1570-1791) refused to attend services of the Church of England, and therefore violated the laws of mandatory church attendance. The name derives from the Latin verb recusare, meaning "reject" or "oppose." The adjective recusant has been in use since the late 16th century. Originally, it meant "refusing to attend the services of the Church of England," but by the century's end, both the adjective and the noun were also being used generally to suggest resistance to authority of any form.

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 23, 1936: First issue of Life is published

This Day in History - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 11:00pm

On November 23, 1936, the first issue of the pictorial magazine Life is published, featuring a cover photo of the Fort Peck Dam by Margaret Bourke-White.

Life actually had its start earlier in the 20th century as a different kind of magazine: a weekly humor publication, not unlike today's The New Yorker in its use of tart cartoons, humorous pieces and cultural reporting. When the original Life folded during the Great Depression, the influential American publisher Henry Luce bought the name and re-launched the magazine as a picture-based periodical on this day in 1936. By this time, Luce had already enjoyed great success as the publisher of Time, a weekly news magazine.

From his high school days, Luce was a newsman, serving with his friend Briton Hadden as managing editors of their school newspaper. This partnership continued through their college years at Yale University, where they acted as chairmen and managing editors of the Yale Daily News, as well as after college, when Luce joined Hadden at The Baltimore News in 1921. It was during this time that Luce and Hadden came up with the idea for Time. When it launched in 1923, it was with the intention of delivering the world's news through the eyes of the people who made it.

Whereas the original mission of Time was to tell the news, the mission of Life was to show it. In the words of Luce himself, the magazine was meant to provide a way for the American people "to see life; to see the world; to eyewitness great events ... to see things thousands of miles away... to see and be amazed; to see and be instructed... to see, and to show..." Luce set the tone of the magazine with Margaret Bourke-White's stunning cover photograph of the Fort Peck Dam, which has since become an icon of the 1930s and the great public works completed under President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal.

Life was an overwhelming success in its first year of publication. Almost overnight, it changed the way people looked at the world by changing the way people could look at the world. Its flourish of images painted vivid pictures in the public mind, capturing the personal and the public, and putting it on display for the world to take in. At its peak, Life had a circulation of over 8 million and it exerted considerable influence on American life in the beginning and middle of the 20th century.

With picture-heavy content as the driving force behind its popularity,the magazine suffered as television became society's predominant means of communication. Life ceased running as a weekly publication in 1972, when it began losing audience and advertising dollars to television. In 2004, however, it resumed weekly publication as a supplement to U.S. newspapers. At its re-launch, its combined circulation was once again in the millions.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 22

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 7:19pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Below, 10 nine letter words have been broken into chunks of three letters.

These chunks have been mixed up, no chunk is used twice and all chunks are used.

Can you determine what the 10 words are?

hol rec ant imp fer con
man dif ice pol acq htn
ort myt new air sag duc
dec lig kch ogy ing tan
uit ent gle tal tor ent

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 22 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 7:19pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 22

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 7:19pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Blocky
   Eat the smaller blocks and avoid being eaten by the bigger ones! As you grow be careful not to get stuck somewhere you can't escape from!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Ethel Mumford

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 6:00pm
"Knowledge is power, if you know it about the right person."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 6:00pm
"A man can stand anything except a succession of ordinary days."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Suzanne Necker

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 6:00pm
"Fortune does not change men, it unmasks them."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Rita Rudner

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 6:00pm
"I was a vegetarian until I started leaning toward the sunlight."
Categories: Fun Stuff

shrive

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 11/22/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 22, 2014 is:

shrive • \SHRYVE\  • verb
1 : to administer the sacrament of reconciliation to 2 : to free from guilt

Examples:
"Once every three months, Pancho took his savings and drove into Monterey to confess his sins, to do his penance, and be shriven and to get drunk, in the order named." — John Steinbeck, The Pastures of Heaven, 1932

"Members of Congress, a generally spineless lot, like nothing better than to be shriven of responsibility for the edicts that come out of Washington." — editorial, The Eagle-Tribune (Andover, Massachusetts), January 30, 2014

Did you know?
We wouldn't want to give the history of shrive short shrift, so here's the whole story. It began when the Latin verb scribere (meaning "to write") found its way onto the tongues of certain Germanic peoples who brought it to Britain in the early Middle Ages. Because it was often used for laying down directions or rules in writing, 8th-century Old English speakers used their form of the term, scrīfan, to mean "to prescribe or impose." The Church adopted scrīfan to refer to the act of assigning penance to sinners and, later, to hearing confession and administering absolution. Today shrift, the noun form of shrive, makes up half of "short shrift," a phrase meaning "little or no consideration." Originally, "short shrift" was the barely adequate time for confession before an execution.

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 22, 1963: John F. Kennedy assassinated

This Day in History - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 11:00pm

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is assassinated while traveling through Dallas, Texas, in an open-top convertible.

First lady Jacqueline Kennedy rarely accompanied her husband on political outings, but she was beside him, along with Texas Governor John Connally and his wife, for a 10-mile motorcade through the streets of downtown Dallas on November 22. Sitting in a Lincoln convertible, the Kennedys and Connallys waved at the large and enthusiastic crowds gathered along the parade route. As their vehicle passed the Texas School Book Depository Building at 12:30 p.m., Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired three shots from the sixth floor, fatally wounding President Kennedy and seriously injuring Governor Connally. Kennedy was pronounced dead 30 minutes later at Dallas' Parkland Hospital. He was 46.

Vice President Lyndon Johnson, who was three cars behind President Kennedy in the motorcade, was sworn in as the 36th president of the United States at 2:39 p.m. He took the presidential oath of office aboard Air Force One as it sat on the runway at Dallas Love Field airport. The swearing in was witnessed by some 30 people, including Jacqueline Kennedy, who was still wearing clothes stained with her husband's blood. Seven minutes later, the presidential jet took off for Washington.

The next day, November 23, President Johnson issued his first proclamation, declaring November 25 to be a day of national mourning for the slain president. On that Monday, hundreds of thousands of people lined the streets of Washington to watch a horse-drawn caisson bear Kennedy's body from the Capitol Rotunda to St. Matthew's Catholic Cathedral for a requiem Mass. The solemn procession then continued on to Arlington National Cemetery, where leaders of 99 nations gathered for the state funeral. Kennedy was buried with full military honors on a slope below Arlington House, where an eternal flame was lit by his widow to forever mark the grave.

Lee Harvey Oswald, born in New Orleans in 1939, joined the U.S. Marines in 1956. He was discharged in 1959 and nine days later left for the Soviet Union, where he tried unsuccessfully to become a citizen. He worked in Minsk and married a Soviet woman and in 1962 was allowed to return to the United States with his wife and infant daughter. In early 1963, he bought a .38 revolver and rifle with a telescopic sight by mail order, and on April 10 in Dallas he allegedly shot at and missed former U.S. Army general Edwin Walker, a figure known for his extreme right-wing views. Later that month, Oswald went to New Orleans and founded a branch of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, a pro-Castro organization. In September 1963, he went to Mexico City, where investigators allege that he attempted to secure a visa to travel to Cuba or return to the USSR. In October, he returned to Dallas and took a job at the Texas School Book Depository Building.

Less than an hour after Kennedy was shot, Oswald killed a policeman who questioned him on the street near his rooming house in Dallas. Thirty minutes later, Oswald was arrested in a movie theater by police responding to reports of a suspect. He was formally arraigned on November 23 for the murders of President Kennedy and Officer J.D. Tippit.

On November 24, Oswald was brought to the basement of the Dallas police headquarters on his way to a more secure county jail. A crowd of police and press with live television cameras rolling gathered to witness his departure. As Oswald came into the room, Jack Ruby emerged from the crowd and fatally wounded him with a single shot from a concealed .38 revolver. Ruby, who was immediately detained, claimed that rage at Kennedy's murder was the motive for his action. Some called him a hero, but he was nonetheless charged with first-degree murder.

Jack Ruby, originally known as Jacob Rubenstein, operated strip joints and dance halls in Dallas and had minor connections to organized crime. He features prominently in Kennedy-assassination theories, and many believe he killed Oswald to keep him from revealing a larger conspiracy. In his trial, Ruby denied the allegation and pleaded innocent on the grounds that his great grief over Kennedy's murder had caused him to suffer "psychomotor epilepsy" and shoot Oswald unconsciously. The jury found Ruby guilty of "murder with malice" and sentenced him to die.

In October 1966, the Texas Court of Appeals reversed the decision on the grounds of improper admission of testimony and the fact that Ruby could not have received a fair trial in Dallas at the time. In January 1967, while awaiting a new trial, to be held in Wichita Falls, Ruby died of lung cancer in a Dallas hospital.

The official Warren Commission report of 1964 concluded that neither Oswald nor Ruby were part of a larger conspiracy, either domestic or international, to assassinate President Kennedy. Despite its seemingly firm conclusions, the report failed to silence conspiracy theories surrounding the event, and in 1978 the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded in a preliminary report that Kennedy was "probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy" that may have involved multiple shooters and organized crime. The committee's findings, as with those of the Warren Commission, continue to be widely disputed.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 21

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 7:05pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Using the new BrainBashers programming language, BrainBasic, the following words have their equivalents next to them, what should FOX be?

CLICK = 100501100K
MILK  = 1000150K
LOG   = 50OG
LIFE  = 501FE
ALIVE = A5015E
FOX   = ==?==

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 21 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 7:05pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 21

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 7:05pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Whacker
   Whack those critters.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 6:00pm
"We don't bother much about dress and manners in England, because as a nation we don't dress well and we've no manners."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George W. Bush

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 6:00pm
"You know what's interesting about Washington? It's the kind of place where second-guessing has become second nature."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Ken Hakuta

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 6:00pm
"Lack of money is no obstacle. Lack of an idea is an obstacle."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Johnny Carson

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 11/21/2014 - 6:00pm
"If it weren't for Philo T. Farnsworth, inventor of television, we'd still be eating frozen radio dinners."
Categories: Fun Stuff