Fun Stuff

Bill Tammeus

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 07/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"Oil prices have fallen lately. We include this news for the benefit of gas stations, which otherwise wouldn't learn of it for six months."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Solomon Short

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 07/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"Any great truth can -- and eventually will -- be expressed as a cliche -- a cliche is a sure and certain way to dilute an idea. For instance, my grandmother used to say, 'The black cat is always the last one off the fence.' I have no idea what she meant, but at one time, it was undoubtedly true."
Categories: Fun Stuff

H. L. Mencken

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 07/29/2014 - 7:00pm
"It is impossible to imagine Goethe or Beethoven being good at billiards or golf."
Categories: Fun Stuff

tweep

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 07/29/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 29, 2014 is:

tweep • \TWEEP\  • noun
: a person who uses the Twitter online message service to send and receive tweets

Examples:
"Rapper Snoop Dogg changed his name to Snoop Lion. Know how I found out? My tweeps told me." — Marc Munroe Dion, The Messenger (Madisonville, Kentucky), August 12, 2012

"More than two million people tweeted their elation and frustration during the game between Australia and Chile yesterday. A whopping 2,223,143 tweets were posted on Twitter as tweeps used the hashtag #CHIAUS during the 90-minute match." — The Advertiser (Australia), June 15, 2014

Did you know?
Twitter and "tweeting" began in 2006, and two years later folks were referring to those who tweet as "tweeps." (The word "tweep" persisted despite a reproach by one blogger in 2008: "Do not post Good morning Twitter peeps! the second you wake up. Or some even more annoying variation like Yo Tweeps!") Today, the portmanteau "tweep" is easy to accept with the omnipresence of Twitter: it's a blend of Twitter's "tweet" and slang's "peeps." The slang use of "peeps" for "people" became common sometime around the mid-20th century. In a 1951 article in the Chicago Tribune, for example, it was reported that "high schoolers are greeting each other with 'Hi, peeps' (short for 'hello, people,' of course)."

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 28

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 11:25pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

For being good at the garden fete, four children were each given two sweets.

Jack had an orange sweet. One child who had a red one also had a blue one. No child had two sweets of the same colour. A child who had a green sweet also had a red one. Jim didn't have a red sweet and Joe had a green one. James didn't have an orange one and Jack had no blue sweets.

Knowing that there were two sweets of each colour, can you tell the colours of the sweets each child had?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 28 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 11:25pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 28

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 11:25pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Reverse 2
   Navigate the simple mazes, but watch out, your mouse movement has been reversed.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 29, 1958: NASA created

This Day in History - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1958, the U.S. Congress passes legislation establishing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), a civilian agency responsible for coordinating America's activities in space. NASA has since sponsored space expeditions, both human and mechanical, that have yielded vital information about the solar system and universe. It has also launched numerous earth-orbiting satellites that have been instrumental in everything from weather forecasting to navigation to global communications.

NASA was created in response to the Soviet Union's October 4, 1957 launch of its first satellite, Sputnik I. The 183-pound, basketball-sized satellite orbited the earth in 98 minutes. The Sputnik launch caught Americans by surprise and sparked fears that the Soviets might also be capable of sending missiles with nuclear weapons from Europe to America. The United States prided itself on being at the forefront of technology, and, embarrassed, immediately began developing a response, signaling the start of the U.S.-Soviet space race.

On November 3, 1957, the Soviets launched Sputnik II, which carried a dog named Laika. In December, America attempted to launch a satellite of its own, called Vanguard, but it exploded shortly after takeoff. On January 31, 1958, things went better with Explorer I, the first U.S. satellite to successfully orbit the earth. In July of that year, Congress passed legislation officially establishing NASA from the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and other government agencies, and confirming the country's commitment to winning the space race. In May 1961, President John F. Kennedy declared that America should put a man on the moon by the end of the decade. On July 20, 1969, NASA's Apollo 11 mission achieved that goal and made history when astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the moon, saying "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."

NASA has continued to make great advances in space exploration since the first moonwalk, including playing a major part in the construction of the International Space Station. The agency has also suffered tragic setbacks, however, such as the disasters that killed the crews of the Challenger space shuttle in 1986 and the Columbia space shuttle in 2003. In 2004, President George Bush challenged NASA to return to the moon by 2020 and establish "an extended human presence" there that could serve as a launching point for "human missions to Mars and to worlds beyond."

Categories: Fun Stuff

Halifax

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"Nothing has an uglier look to us than reason, when it is not on our side."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"If history repeats itself, and the unexpected always happens, how incapable must Man be of learning from experience."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Rita Rudner

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"My husband gave me a necklace. It's fake. I requested fake. Maybe I'm paranoid, but in this day and age, I don't want something around my neck that's worth more than my head."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Tom Lehrer

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 7:00pm
"The Army has carried the American ... ideal to its logical conclusion. Not only do they prohibit discrimination on the grounds of race, creed and color, but also on ability."
Categories: Fun Stuff

numismatic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 07/28/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 28, 2014 is:

numismatic • \noo-muz-MAT-ik\  • adjective
1 : of or relating to the study or collection of coins, tokens, and money 2 : of or relating to currency : monetary

Examples:
Jasmine was disappointed to learn that the 1936 buffalo nickel she owned had virtually no numismatic value.

"Steve is well-known in the numismatic community as a specialist in National Currency and is very passionate in his teachings and publications…." — Lake Sun Leader (Camdenton, Missouri), March 21, 2014

Did you know?
The first metal coins are believed to have been used as currency by the Lydians, a people of Asia Minor, during the 7th century B.C.E., and it is likely that folks began collecting coins not long after that. The name that we give to the collection of coins today is "numismatics," a word that also encompasses the collection of paper money and of medals. The noun "numismatics" and the adjective "numismatic" came to English (via French "numismatique") from Latin and Greek "nomisma," meaning "coin." "Nomisma" in turn derives from the Greek verb "nomizein" ("to use") and ultimately from the noun "nomos" ("custom" or "usage"). From these roots we also get "numismatist," referring to a person who collects coins, medals, or paper money.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 27

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 11:11pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

A man gave one son 10 cents and another son was given 15 cents. What time was it?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 27 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 11:11pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 27

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 11:11pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Escape Artist
   Can you escape from the painter's studio? A nice relaxing puzzle of the 'escape the room' genre.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 28, 1868: 14th Amendment adopted

This Day in History - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 11:00pm

Following its ratification by the necessary three-quarters of U.S. states, the 14th Amendment, guaranteeing to African Americans citizenship and all its privileges, is officially adopted into the U.S. Constitution.

Two years after the Civil War, the Reconstruction Acts of 1867 divided the South into five military districts, where new state governments, based on universal manhood suffrage, were to be established. Thus began the period known as Radical Reconstruction, which saw the 14th Amendment, which had been passed by Congress in 1866, ratified in July 1868. The amendment resolved pre-Civil War questions of African American citizenship by stating that "all persons born or naturalized in the United States...are citizens of the United States and of the state in which they reside." The amendment then reaffirmed the privileges and rights of all citizens, and granted all these citizens the "equal protection of the laws."

In the decades after its adoption, the equal protection clause was cited by a number of African American activists who argued that racial segregation denied them the equal protection of law. However, in 1896, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Plessy v. Ferguson that states could constitutionally provide segregated facilities for African Americans, so long as they were equal to those afforded white persons. The Plessy v. Ferguson decision, which announced federal toleration of the so-called "separate but equal" doctrine, was eventually used to justify segregating all public facilities, including railroad cars, restaurants, hospitals, and schools. However, "colored" facilities were never equal to their white counterparts, and African Americans suffered through decades of debilitating discrimination in the South and elsewhere. In 1954, Plessy v. Ferguson was finally struck down by the Supreme Court in its ruling in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Jules Renard

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 7:00pm
"Writing is the only profession where no one considers you ridiculous if you earn no money."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Henry Kissinger

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 7:00pm
"Nobody will ever win the Battle of the Sexes. There's just too much fraternizing with the enemy."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 7:00pm
"Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation."
Categories: Fun Stuff