Fun Stuff

Wilson Mizner

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/21/2016 - 7:00pm
"Those who welcome death have only tried it from the ears up."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Maureen Murphy

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/21/2016 - 7:00pm
"The reason there are so few female politicians is that it is too much trouble to put makeup on two faces."
Categories: Fun Stuff

hypocorism

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 08/21/2016 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 21, 2016 is:

hypocorism • \hye-PAH-kuh-riz-um\  • noun

1 : a pet name

2 : the use of pet names

Examples:

People began to refer to the elusive and mysterious Loch Ness monster by the hypocorism "Nessie" in the 1940s.

"… the use of hypocorisms … is on the decline (only my Aunt Dorothy is still called Toots), and terms of endearment have come under suspicion ('Call me Dollboat or Sweetie-Pie one more time, Mr. Snodgrass, and you've got a harassment suit on your hands')." — William Safire, The New York Times, 27 Sept. 1992

Did you know?

In Late Latin and Greek, the words hypocorisma and hypokorisma had the same meaning as hypocorism does in English today. They in turn evolved from the Greek verb hypokorizesthai ("to call by pet names"), which itself comes from korizesthai ("to caress"). Hypocorism joined the English language in the mid-19th century and was once briefly a buzzword among linguists, who used it rather broadly to mean "adult baby talk"—that is, the altered speech adults use when supposedly imitating babies. Once the baby talk issue faded, hypocorism settled back into being just a fancy word for a pet name. Pet names can be diminutives like "Johnny" for "John," endearing terms such as "honey-bunch," or, yes, names from baby talk, like "Nana" for "Grandma."



Categories: Fun Stuff

August 21, 1959: Hawaii becomes 50th state

This Day in History - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 11:00pm

The modern United States receives its crowning star when President Dwight D. Eisenhower signs a proclamation admitting Hawaii into the Union as the 50th state. The president also issued an order for an American flag featuring 50 stars arranged in staggered rows: five six-star rows and four five-star rows. The new flag became official July 4, 1960.

The first known settlers of the Hawaiian Islands were Polynesian voyagers who arrived sometime in the eighth century. In the early 18th century, American traders came to Hawaii to exploit the islands’ sandalwood, which was much valued in China at the time. In the 1830s, the sugar industry was introduced to Hawaii and by the mid 19th century had become well established. American missionaries and planters brought about great changes in Hawaiian political, cultural, economic, and religious life. In 1840, a constitutional monarchy was established, stripping the Hawaiian monarch of much of his authority.

In 1893, a group of American expatriates and sugar planters supported by a division of U.S. Marines deposed Queen Liliuokalani, the last reigning monarch of Hawaii. One year later, the Republic of Hawaii was established as a U.S. protectorate with Hawaiian-born Sanford B. Dole as president. Many in Congress opposed the formal annexation of Hawaii, and it was not until 1898, following the use of the naval base at Pearl Harbor during the Spanish-American War, that Hawaii’s strategic importance became evident and formal annexation was approved. Two years later, Hawaii was organized into a formal U.S. territory. During World War II, Hawaii became firmly ensconced in the American national identity following the surprise Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

In March 1959, the U.S. government approved statehood for Hawaii, and in June the Hawaiian people voted by a wide majority to accept admittance into the United States. Two months later, Hawaii officially became the 50th state.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Jules Renard

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 7:00pm
"Failure is not the only punishment for laziness; there is also the success of others."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Gail Godwin

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 7:00pm
"Good teaching is one-fourth preparation and three-fourths theater."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Father Larry Lorenzoni

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 7:00pm
"The average person thinks he isn't."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Galileo Galilei

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 7:00pm
"I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn't learn something from him."
Categories: Fun Stuff

namby-pamby

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 20, 2016 is:

namby-pamby • \nam-bee-PAM-bee\  • adjective

1 : lacking in character or substance : insipid

2 : weak, indecisive

Examples:

John complained that the movie was a namby-pamby romance with too much dialogue and not enough action.

"I go to a barber for a haircut and clip my own nails, and would rather smell broccoli cooking for a week than go to some namby-pamby spa place to get … my body kneaded like a loaf of over-fermented Wonder Bread." — Michael Penkava, The Northwest Herald (Crystal Lake, Illinois), 27 Feb. 2016

Did you know?

Eighteenth-century poets Alexander Pope and Henry Carey didn't think much of their contemporary Ambrose Philips. His sentimental, singsong verses were too childish and simple for their palates. In 1726, Carey came up with the rhyming nickname Namby-Pamby (playing on Ambrose) to parody Philips: "Namby-Pamby's doubly mild / Once a man and twice a child ... / Now he pumps his little wits / All by little tiny bits." In 1729, Pope borrowed the nickname to take his own satirical jab at Philips in the poem "The Dunciad." Before long, namby-pamby was being applied to any piece of writing that was insipidly precious, simple, or sentimental, and later to anyone considered pathetically weak or indecisive.



Categories: Fun Stuff

August 20, 1911: First around-the-world telegram sent, 66 years before Voyager II launch

This Day in History - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1911, a dispatcher in the New York Times office sends the first telegram around the world via commercial service. Exactly 66 years later, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sends a different kind of message–a phonograph record containing information about Earth for extraterrestrial beings–shooting into space aboard the unmanned spacecraft Voyager II.

The Times decided to send its 1911 telegram in order to determine how fast a commercial message could be sent around the world by telegraph cable. The message, reading simply “This message sent around the world,” left the dispatch room on the 17th floor of the Times building in New York at 7 p.m. on August 20. After it traveled more than 28,000 miles, being relayed by 16 different operators, through San Francisco, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Saigon, Singapore, Bombay, Malta, Lisbon and the Azores–among other locations–the reply was received by the same operator 16.5 minutes later. It was the fastest time achieved by a commercial cablegram since the opening of the Pacific cable in 1900 by the Commercial Cable Company.

On August 20, 1977, a NASA rocket launched Voyager II, an unmanned 1,820-pound spacecraft, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. It was the first of two such crafts to be launched that year on a “Grand Tour” of the outer planets, organized to coincide with a rare alignment of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Aboard Voyager II was a 12-inch copper phonograph record called “Sounds of Earth.” Intended as a kind of introductory time capsule, the record included greetings in 60 languages and scientific information about Earth and the human race, along with classical, jazz and rock ‘n’ roll music, nature sounds like thunder and surf, and recorded messages from President Jimmy Carter and other world leaders.

The brainchild of astronomer Carl Sagan, the record was sent with Voyager II and its twin craft, Voyager I–launched just two weeks later–in the faint hope that it might one day be discovered by extraterrestrial creatures. The record was sealed in an aluminum jacket that would keep it intact for 1 billion years, along with instructions on how to play the record, with a cartridge and needle provided.

More importantly, the two Voyager crafts were designed to explore the outer solar system and send information and photographs of the distant planets to Earth. Over the next 12 years, the mission proved a smashing success. After both crafts flew by Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager I went flying off towards the solar system’s edge while Voyager II visited Uranus, Neptune and finally Pluto in 1990 before sailing off to join its twin in the outer solar system.

Thanks to the Voyager program, NASA scientists gained a wealth of information about the outer planets, including close-up photographs of Saturn’s seven rings; evidence of active geysers and volcanoes exploding on some of the four planets’ 22 moons; winds of more than 1,500 mph on Neptune; and measurements of the magnetic fields on Uranus and Neptune. The two crafts are expected to continue sending data until 2020, or until their plutonium-based power sources run out. After that, they will continue to sail on through the galaxy for millions of years to come, barring some unexpected collision.

Categories: Fun Stuff

G. K. Chesterton

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 7:00pm
"Beware of no man more than yourself; we carry our worst enemies within us."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 7:00pm
"A conservative is a man with two perfectly good legs who, however, has never learned to walk forward."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Anonymous

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 7:00pm
"Nobody knows the age of the human race, but everybody agrees that it is old enough to know better."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Kin Hubbard

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 7:00pm
"Boys will be boys, and so will a lot of middle-aged men."
Categories: Fun Stuff

fret

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 19, 2016 is:

fret • \FRET\  • verb

1 a : to eat or gnaw into : wear, corrode; also : fray

b : rub, chafe

c : to make by wearing away

2 : to become vexed or worried

3 : agitate, ripple

Examples:

"You shouldn't fret so much over your wardrobe," Liza said. "You look great no matter what you wear."

"Not so long ago independent booksellers fretted about the Nooks and the Kindles and the iPad—digital reading devices. And if that didn't scare them, the trend of reading everything on a phone was worrisome." — Darrell Ehrlick, The Billings (Montana) Gazette, 22 July 2016

Did you know?

Since its first use centuries ago, fret has referred to an act of eating, especially when done by animals—in particular, small ones. You might speak, for example, of moths fretting your clothing. Like eat, fret also developed figurative senses to describe actions that corrode or wear away. A river could be said to "fret away" at its banks or something might be said to be "fretted out" with time or age. Fret can also be applied to emotional experiences so that something that "eats away at us" might be said to "fret the heart or mind." This use developed into the specific meaning of "vex" or "worry" with which we often use fret today.



Categories: Fun Stuff

August 19, 1909: First race is held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

This Day in History - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1909, the first race is held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, now the home of the world’s most famous motor racing competition, the Indianapolis 500.

Built on 328 acres of farmland five miles northwest of Indianapolis, Indiana, the speedway was started by local businessmen as a testing facility for Indiana’s growing automobile industry. The idea was that occasional races at the track would pit cars from different manufacturers against each other. After seeing what these cars could do, spectators would presumably head down to the showroom of their choice to get a closer look.

The rectangular two-and-a-half-mile track linked four turns, each exactly 440 yards from start to finish, by two long and two short straight sections. In that first five-mile race on August 19, 1909, 12,000 spectators watched Austrian engineer Louis Schwitzer win with an average speed of 57.4 miles per hour. The track’s surface of crushed rock and tar proved a disaster, breaking up in a number of places and causing the deaths of two drivers, two mechanics and two spectators.

The surface was soon replaced with 3.2 million paving bricks, laid in a bed of sand and fixed with mortar. Dubbed “The Brickyard,” the speedway reopened in December 1909. In 1911, low attendance led the track’s owners to make a crucial decision: Instead of shorter races, they resolved to focus on a single, longer event each year, for a much larger prize. That May 30 marked the debut of the Indy 500–a grueling 500-mile race that was an immediate hit with audiences and drew press attention from all over the country. Driver Ray Haroun won the purse of $14,250, with an average speed of 74.59 mph and a total time of 6 hours and 42 minutes.

Since 1911, the Indianapolis 500 has been held every year, with the exception of 1917-18 and 1942-45, when the United States was involved in the two world wars. With an average crowd of 400,000, the Indy 500 is the best-attended event in U.S. sports. In 1936, asphalt was used for the first time to cover the rougher parts of the track, and by 1941 most of the track was paved. The last of the speedway’s original bricks were covered in 1961, except for a three-foot line of bricks left exposed at the start-finish line as a nostalgic reminder of the track’s history.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Mark Twain

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 7:00pm
"The holy passion of Friendship is of so sweet and steady and loyal and enduring a nature that it will last through a whole lifetime, if not asked to lend money."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Orwell

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 7:00pm
"Every generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Douglas Adams

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 7:00pm
"I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by."
Categories: Fun Stuff

David Letterman

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 7:00pm
"Sometimes when you look in his eyes you get the feeling that someone else is driving."
Categories: Fun Stuff