Fun Stuff

Matt Frewer

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 06/25/2015 - 7:00pm
"Never knock on Death's door: ring the bell and run away! Death really hates that!"
Categories: Fun Stuff

futile

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Thu, 06/25/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 25, 2015 is:

futile • \FYOO-tul\  • adjective
1 : serving no useful purpose : completely ineffective 2 : occupied with trifles : frivolous

Examples:
Unfortunately, all efforts to repair the damage ultimately proved futile.

"Kumiko's journey is a tragic one. It is made clear from the beginning that her quest is futile." — Josh Weitzel, Columbia Chronicle (Columbia College Chicago), April 13, 2015

Did you know?
Futile floated into the English language in the mid-16th century from Middle French, where it took shape from the Latin adjective futilis, meaning "that easily pours out" or "leaky." That leak of information lets you in on how futile developed its "ineffective" and "frivolous" meanings: things that are leaky are of no use. In 1827, English author Robert Southey found use for the word by blending it into utilitarian to form futilitarian, a word that is used today for anyone who believes that human striving is futile.

Categories: Fun Stuff

June 25, 1876: Battle of Little Bighorn

This Day in History - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1876, Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer in a bloody battle near southern Montana’s Little Bighorn River.

Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, leaders of the Sioux tribe on the Great Plains, strongly resisted the mid-19th-century efforts of the U.S. government to confine their people to reservations. In 1875, after gold was discovered in South Dakota’s Black Hills, the U.S. Army ignored previous treaty agreements and invaded the region. This betrayal led many Sioux and Cheyenne tribesmen to leave their reservations and join Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana. By the late spring of 1876, more than 10,000 Native Americans had gathered in a camp along the Little Bighorn River–which they called the Greasy Grass–in defiance of a U.S. War Department order to return to their reservations or risk being attacked.

In mid-June, three columns of U.S. soldiers lined up against the camp and prepared to march. A force of 1,200 Native Americans turned back the first column on June 17. Five days later, General Alfred Terry ordered Custer’s 7th Cavalry to scout ahead for enemy troops. On the morning of June 25, Custer drew near the camp and decided to press on ahead rather than wait for reinforcements.

At mid-day, Custer’s 600 men entered the Little Bighorn Valley. Among the Native Americans, word quickly spread of the impending attack. The older Sitting Bull rallied the warriors and saw to the safety of the women and children, while Crazy Horse set off with a large force to meet the attackers head on. Despite Custer’s desperate attempts to regroup his men, they were quickly overwhelmed. Custer and some 200 men in his battalion were attacked by as many as 3,000 Native Americans; within an hour, Custer and every last one of his soldier were dead.

The Battle of Little Bighorn–also called Custer’s Last Stand–marked the most decisive Native American victory and the worst U.S. Army defeat in the long Plains Indian War. The gruesome fate of Custer and his men outraged many white Americans and confirmed their image of the Indians as wild and bloodthirsty. Meanwhile, the U.S. government increased its efforts to subdue the tribes. Within five years, almost all of the Sioux and Cheyenne would be confined to reservations.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - June 24

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:28pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you complete the following language equations? For example 24 H in a D is 24 Hours in a Day.

7 D in a W
A S has 4 S
C 22
20,000 L U the S
8 P in the S S
1760 Y in a M

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - June 24 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:28pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - June 24

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:28pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Wordo
   Clear the board by spelling the words. The longer the word the more points.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Edith Wharton

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:00pm
"There are lots of ways of being miserable, but there's only one way of being comfortable, and that is to stop running round after happiness. If you make up your mind not to be happy there's no reason why you shouldn't have a fairly good time."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Don Marquis

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:00pm
"Honesty is a good thing, but it is not profitable to its possessor unless it is kept under control."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Henry David Thoreau

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:00pm
"Thank God men cannot as yet fly and lay waste the sky as well as the earth!"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Robert Byrne

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:00pm
"There are two kinds of people, those who finish what they start and so on."
Categories: Fun Stuff

anastrophe

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 24, 2015 is:

anastrophe • \uh-NASS-truh-fee\  • noun
: inversion of the usual syntactical order of words for rhetorical effect

Examples:
My father was fond of word play, especially anastrophe, when he talked to my sister and me about things we would rather not talk about; he would say things like "Tired you are not but to bed you must go."

"Should you buy 'Farnsworth's Classical English Rhetoric'? If you're at all interested in the techniques of writing, yes. At the very least, you'll learn that that last sentence, with its inversion of the usual word order —'yes' at the end instead of the beginning of the sentence—is an instance of anastrophe." — Michael Dirda, Washington Post, May 5, 2011

Did you know?
"Powerful you have become Dooku, the dark side I sense in you." Fans of Star Wars will recognize Yoda's line in Attack of the Clones. Others might guess that Yoda is the speaker because of the unconventional syntax that is the hallmark of Yoda's speech. (In typical Yoda fashion, the subject is second instead of first in both clauses—it follows a predicate adjective and the direct object, respectively.) The name for this kind of syntactical inversion is anastrophe, from the Greek verb anastrephein, meaning "to turn back." President John F. Kennedy employed anastrophe for rhetorical effect when he inverted the typical positive-to-negative parallelism in his famous line "Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country." In poetry, anastrophe is often used to create rhythm, as in these lines from Lewis Carroll's "Jabberwocky": "So rested he by the Tumtum tree, / And stood awhile in thought."

Categories: Fun Stuff

June 24, 1997: U.S. Air Force reports on Roswell

This Day in History - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1997, U.S. Air Force officials release a 231-page report dismissing long-standing claims of an alien spacecraft crash in Roswell, New Mexico, almost exactly 50 years earlier.

Public interest in Unidentified Flying Objects, or UFOs, began to flourish in the 1940s, when developments in space travel and the dawn of the atomic age caused many Americans to turn their attention to the skies. The town of Roswell, located near the Pecos River in southeastern New Mexico, became a magnet for UFO believers due to the strange events of early July 1947, when ranch foreman W.W. Brazel found a strange, shiny material scattered over some of his land. He turned the material over to the sheriff, who passed it on to authorities at the nearby Air Force base. On July 8, Air Force officials announced they had recovered the wreckage of a “flying disk.” A local newspaper put the story on its front page, launching Roswell into the spotlight of the public’s UFO fascination.

The Air Force soon took back their story, however, saying the debris had been merely a downed weather balloon. Aside from die-hard UFO believers, or “ufologists,” public interest in the so-called “Roswell Incident” faded until the late 1970s, when claims surfaced that the military had invented the weather balloon story as a cover-up. Believers in this theory argued that officials had in fact retrieved several alien bodies from the crashed spacecraft, which were now stored in the mysterious Area 51 installation in Nevada. Seeking to dispel these suspicions, the Air Force issued a 1,000-page report in 1994 stating that the crashed object was actually a high-altitude weather balloon launched from a nearby missile test-site as part of a classified experiment aimed at monitoring the atmosphere in order to detect Soviet nuclear tests.

On July 24, 1997, barely a week before the extravagant 50th anniversary celebration of the incident, the Air Force released yet another report on the controversial subject. Titled “The Roswell Report, Case Closed,” the document stated definitively that there was no Pentagon evidence that any kind of life form was found in the Roswell area in connection with the reported UFO sightings, and that the “bodies” recovered were not aliens but dummies used in parachute tests conducted in the region. Any hopes that this would put an end to the cover-up debate were in vain, as furious ufologists rushed to point out the report’s inconsistencies. With conspiracy theories still alive and well on the Internet, Roswell continues to thrive as a tourist destination for UFO enthusiasts far and wide, hosting the annual UFO Encounter Festival each July and welcoming visitors year-round to its International UFO Museum and Research Center.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - June 23

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:15pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

A bookworm eats from the first page of an encyclopaedia number 1 to the last page of encyclopaedia number 5.

The bookworm eats in a straight line and the encyclopaedia is sitting on a bookshelf in the usual order.

Each encyclopaedia consists of 400 pages.

Each page is 0.01 inches thick and each cover is 0.25 inches thick.

What distance does the bookworm eat through?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - June 23 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:15pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - June 23

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:15pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

WOne
   Roll through each level collecting barrels in this fun physics-based game!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

George Burns

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"You know you're getting old when you stoop to tie your shoelaces and wonder what else you could do while you're down there."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"Hell is full of musical amateurs."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Robert Frost

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"Love is an irresistible desire to be irresistibly desired."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Will Cuppy

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"Aristotle was famous for knowing everything. He taught that the brain exists merely to cool the blood and is not involved in the process of thinking. This is true only of certain persons."
Categories: Fun Stuff

belated

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 23, 2015 is:

belated • \bih-LAY-tud\  • adjective
1 : delayed beyond the usual time 2 : existing or appearing past the normal or proper time

Examples:
Susan called Jim to let him know that a belated birthday gift from her was on its way.

"Friends and neighbors of the state Capitol complex joined Lt. Gov. Angela McLean Friday in a belated Earth Day celebration, planting trees and dedicating a new garden space across from the Capitol." — Independent Record (Montana), May 1, 2015

Did you know?
Long ago, there was a verb belate, which meant "to make late." From the beginning, belate tended to mostly turn up in the form of its past participle belated. Eventually, belate itself fell out of use, leaving behind belated as an adjective that preserved the original notion of delay. As you may have guessed, belate and its descendant belated derive from the adjective late; belate was formed by simply combining the prefix be- ("to cause to be") with late. Belated was also once used in the sense "overtaken by night," as in "belated travelers seeking lodging for the night." This sense was in fact the first meaning of the adjective but it too fell out of use.

Categories: Fun Stuff