Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 26 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 6:01pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 26

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 6:01pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Super Fishing
   Fishing for fun!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

suffrage

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 26, 2014 is:

suffrage • \SUF-rij\  • noun
1 : a vote given in deciding a disputed question or electing a person for an office or trust 2 : the right of voting; also : the exercise of such right

Examples:
On August 26, 1920—42 years after such an amendment had first been introduced in Congress—the Nineteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution became law, finally granting women suffrage.

"The Clark Chateau, 321 W. Broadway St., is hosting an exhibit that celebrates the centennial of women’s suffrage in the state of Montana." — Montana Standard, July 9, 2014

Did you know?
Why would a 17th-century writer warn people that a chapel was only for "private or secret suffrages"? Because in addition to the meanings listed above, "suffrage" has been used since the 14th century to mean "prayer" (especially a prayer requesting divine help or intercession). So how did "suffrage" come to mean "a vote" or "the right to vote"? To answer that, we must look to the word’s Latin ancestor, "suffragium," which can be translated as "vote," "support," or "prayer." That term produced descendants in a number of languages, and English picked up its senses of "suffrage" from two different places. We took the "prayer" sense from a Middle French "suffragium" offspring that emphasized the word’s spiritual aspects, and we elected to adopt the "voting" senses directly from the original Latin.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 25

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 11:51pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find anagrams of the following words?

ASPIRATE
ALARMING
BLEATING
DECIMATE
CREATIVE
CHEATING
DOWNLOAD
GRADIENT
ALTITUDE
GENERATE

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 25 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 11:51pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 25

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 11:51pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Extreme Heli Boarding
   Jump out of a helicopter for a thrilling ride through the untouched snow, performing massive jumps and tricks at extreme height.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 26, 1939: First televised Major League baseball game

This Day in History - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1939, the first televised Major League baseball game is broadcast on station W2XBS, the station that was to become WNBC-TV. Announcer Red Barber called the game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York.

At the time, television was still in its infancy. Regular programming did not yet exist, and very few people owned television sets--there were only about 400 in the New York area. Not until 1946 did regular network broadcasting catch on in the United States, and only in the mid-1950s did television sets become more common in the American household.

In 1939, the World's Fair--which was being held in New York--became the catalyst for the historic broadcast. The television was one of fair’s prize exhibits, and organizers believed that the Dodgers-Reds doubleheader on August 26 was the perfect event to showcase America's grasp on the new technology.

By today's standards, the video coverage was somewhat crude. There were only two stationary camera angles: The first was placed down the third base line to pick up infield throws to first, and the second was placed high above home plate to get an extensive view of the field. It was also difficult to capture fast-moving plays: Swinging bats looked like paper fans, and the ball was all but invisible during pitches and hits.

Nevertheless, the experiment was a success, driving interest in the development of television technology, particularly for sporting events. Though baseball owners were initially concerned that televising baseball would sap actual attendance, they soon warmed to the idea, and the possibilities for revenue generation that came with increased exposure of the game, including the sale of rights to air certain teams or games and television advertising.

Today, televised sports is a multi-billion dollar industry, with technology that gives viewers an astounding amount of visual and audio detail. Cameras are now so precise that they can capture the way a ball changes shape when struck by a bat, and athletes are wired to pick up field-level and sideline conversation.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Friedrich Nietzsche

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"The visionary lies to himself, the liar only to others."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Eric Hoffer

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"We are more ready to try the untried when what we do is inconsequential. Hence the fact that many inventions had their birth as toys."
Categories: Fun Stuff

James Madison

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"If men were angels, no government would be necessary."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Cyra McFadden

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"I no longer prepare food or drink with more than one ingredient."
Categories: Fun Stuff

operose

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 25, 2014 is:

operose • \AH-puh-rohss\  • adjective
: tedious, wearisome

Examples:
The operose volume offers up considerably more verbiage than useful information.

"But now competitors face an operose task: it is not enough that they know how to spell a tongue-twister, they should also know its meaning." — Economic Times, April 16, 2013

Did you know?
"Operose" comes from the Latin "operosus" (meaning "laborious," "industrious," or "painstaking"). That word combines the noun "oper-," "opus," which means "work," with "-osus," the Latin equivalent of the English "-ose" and "-ous" suffixes, meaning "full of" or "abounding in." In its earliest uses, beginning in the mid-1500s, the word was used to describe people who are industrious or painstaking in their efforts. Within a little over 100 years, however, the word was being applied as it more commonly is today: to describe tasks and undertakings requiring much time and effort.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 24

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 11:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Many years ago, befor modern educashun in the new millenium, one problem in skools was baseic speeling and grammer. To conbat this and rays acheivement, teechers were adviced to start at the very begining, at the yungest age. Once they had managed to breath new life into leessons, progres came quickly - sucess was then garanteed. How many speeling errors would modern skolars identify in this paragraph?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 24 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 11:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 24

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 11:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Wordo
   Clear the board by spelling the words. The longer the word the more points.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 25, 1835: The Great Moon Hoax

This Day in History - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1835, the first in a series of six articles announcing the supposed discovery of life on the moon appears in the New York Sun newspaper.

Known collectively as "The Great Moon Hoax," the articles were supposedly reprinted from the Edinburgh Journal of Science. The byline was Dr. Andrew Grant, described as a colleague of Sir John Herschel, a famous astronomer of the day. Herschel had in fact traveled to Capetown, South Africa, in January 1834 to set up an observatory with a powerful new telescope. As Grant described it, Herschel had found evidence of life forms on the moon, including such fantastic animals as unicorns, two-legged beavers and furry, winged humanoids resembling bats. The articles also offered vivid description of the moon's geography, complete with massive craters, enormous amethyst crystals, rushing rivers and lush vegetation.

The New York Sun, founded in 1833, was one of the new "penny press" papers that appealed to a wider audience with a cheaper price and a more narrative style of journalism. From the day the first moon hoax article was released, sales of the paper shot up considerably. It was exciting stuff, and readers lapped it up. The only problem was that none of it was true. The Edinburgh Journal of Science had stopped publication years earlier, and Grant was a fictional character. The articles were most likely written by Richard Adams Locke, a Sun reporter educated at Cambridge University. Intended as satire, they were designed to poke fun at earlier, serious speculations about extraterrestrial life, particularly those of Reverend Thomas Dick, a popular science writer who claimed in his bestselling books that the moon alone had 4.2 billion inhabitants.

Readers were completely taken in by the story, however, and failed to recognize it as satire. The craze over Herschel's supposed discoveries even fooled a committee of Yale University scientists, who traveled to New York in search of the Edinburgh Journal articles. After Sun employees sent them back and forth between the printing and editorial offices, hoping to discourage them, the scientists returned to New Haven without realizing they had been tricked.

On September 16, 1835, the Sun admitted the articles had been a hoax. People were generally amused by the whole thing, and sales of the paper didn’t suffer. The Sun continued operation until 1950, when it merged with the New York World-Telegram. The merger folded in 1967. A new New York Sun newspaper was founded in 2002, but it has no relation to the original.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Josh Billings

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"About the most originality that any writer can hope to achieve honestly is to steal with good judgment."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Stephen Vizinczey

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"Strange as it seems, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and higher education positively fortifies it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Charles Kuralt

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"Thanks to the Interstate Highway System, it is now possible to travel from coast to coast without seeing anything."
Categories: Fun Stuff

E. M. Forster

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"I would rather be a coward than brave because people hurt you when you are brave."
Categories: Fun Stuff