Fun Stuff

David Frost

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:00pm
"Television enables you to be entertained in your home by people you wouldn't have in your home."
Categories: Fun Stuff

stereotactic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 09, 2014 is:

stereotactic • \stair-ee-uh-TAK-tik\  • adjective
: involving or used in a surgical technique for precisely directing the tip of a delicate instrument or beam of radiation in three planes using coordinates provided by medical imaging in order to reach a specific locus in the body

Examples:
"Once in the OR, Mario was given a local anesthetic. His head had been shaved, his brain targeted to millimeter precision by MRIs. Attached to his head was a stereotactic frame to provide surgeons with precise coordinates and mapping imagery." — Lauren Slater, Mother Jones, November 2005

"The center is equipped with a $5 million machine, known as a stereotactic body radiotherapy system, that zaps tumors with high doses of radiation without damaging nearby tissue and organs." — James T. Mulder, The Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), July 18, 2014

Did you know?
At the beginning of the 20th century, neurosurgeons were experimenting with a technique used to direct the tip of a needle or an electrode in three spatial planes (length, width, and depth) to reach a particular place in the brain. At that time, the word for this technique was "stereotaxic," based on the prefix "stereo-" ("dealing with three dimensions of space") and "taxis" (referring to the manual restoration of a displaced body part). In 1950, "stereotactic" (based on "tactic," meaning "of or relating to touch") joined the medical vocabulary as a synonym of "stereotaxic." Around the same time, a noninvasive neurosurgery technique was developed using beams of radiation. It is this procedure that is now often described as "stereotactic" and (less frequently) "stereotaxic."

Categories: Fun Stuff

September 9, 1893: President's child born in White House

This Day in History - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 11:00pm

Frances Folsom Cleveland, the wife of President Grover Cleveland, gives birth to a daughter, Esther, in the White House.

On June 2, 1886, in an intimate ceremony held in the Blue Room of the White House, President Grover Cleveland married Frances Folsom, the daughter of Cleveland's late law partner and friend, Oscar Folsom. Fewer than 40 people were present to witness the 49-year-old president exchange vows with Frances, who at 21 years of age became the youngest first lady in U.S. history.

As a devoted family friend, Cleveland allegedly bought "Frank" her first baby carriage. After her father's death, he administered her estate. When Frances entered Wells College, Cleveland, then the governor of New York, asked Mrs. Folsom's permission to correspond with the young lady. After his inauguration as president in 1885, Frances visited Cleveland at the executive mansion. Despite a 27-year difference in age, their affection turned to romance, and in 1886 the couple were married in the White House.

Mrs. Cleveland, who replaced Cleveland's sister Rose Elizabeth as White House hostess, won immediate popularity for her good looks and unaffected charm. After the president's defeat in his 1888 reelection bid, the Clevelands lived in New York City, where their first child, Ruth, was born in 1891. In 1892, in an event unprecedented in U.S. political history, the out-of-office Cleveland was elected president again. Frances Cleveland returned to Washington and resumed her duties as first lady as if she had been gone but a day. On September 9, 1893, the first family saw the addition of a second child. Esther was the first child of a president to be born in the White House but not the first child ever to be born there. In 1806, James Madison Randolph was born to Martha Randolph, the daughter of President Thomas Jefferson.

When Grover Cleveland left the presidency in 1897, his wife had become one of the most popular first ladies in history. In 1908, she was at his side when he died at their home in Princeton, New Jersey. Five years later, she married Thomas J. Preston, Jr., a professor of archeology at Princeton University.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - September 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 9:02pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

If it takes 3 people 1 hour to dig a hole, how long does it take them to dig half a hole?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - September 8 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 9:02pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - September 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 9:02pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Crate Man
   Lead the crate man to the red door.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Cullen Hightower

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"Those who agree with us may not be right, but we admire their astuteness."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Albert Einstein

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"Too many of us look upon Americans as dollar chasers. This is a cruel libel, even if it is reiterated thoughtlessly by the Americans themselves."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Mark Twain

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Simon Cameron

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"An honest politician is one who, when he is bought, will stay bought."
Categories: Fun Stuff

culprit

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 09/08/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 08, 2014 is:

culprit • \KUL-prit\  • noun
1 : one accused of or charged with a crime 2 : one guilty of a crime or a fault 3 : the source or cause of a problem

Examples:
After the empty warehouse burned down, an investigation determined faulty wiring to be the culprit.

"Police searched a parking structure in the Mid-City area of Los Angeles Saturday for one of two armed suspects who robbed a pedestrian but were unable to locate the culprit." — Los Angeles Daily News, August 2, 2014

Did you know?
We would be culpable if we didn't clearly explain the origins behind culprit. Yes, it is related to culpable, which itself derives from Latin culpare, meaning "to blame," via Middle English and Anglo-French. But the etymology of culprit is not so straightforward. In Anglo-French, culpable meant "guilty," and this was abbreviated "cul." in legal briefs and texts. Culprit was formed by combining this abbreviation with prest, prit, meaning "ready"—that is, ready to prove an accusation. Literally, then, a culprit was one who was ready to be proven guilty. English then borrowed the word for one accused of a wrongdoing.

Categories: Fun Stuff

September 8, 1974: Ford pardons Nixon

This Day in History - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 11:00pm

In a controversial executive action, President Gerald Ford pardons his disgraced predecessor Richard Nixon for any crimes he may have committed or participated in while in office. Ford later defended this action before the House Judiciary Committee, explaining that he wanted to end the national divisions created by the Watergate scandal.

The Watergate scandal erupted after it was revealed that Nixon and his aides had engaged in illegal activities during his reelection campaign--and then attempted to cover up evidence of wrongdoing. With impeachment proceedings underway against him in Congress, Nixon bowed to public pressure and became the first American president to resign. At noon on August 9, Nixon officially ended his term, departing with his family in a helicopter from the White House lawn. Minutes later, Vice President Gerald R. Ford was sworn in as the 38th president of the United States in the East Room of the White House. After taking the oath of office, President Ford spoke to the nation in a television address, declaring, "My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over."

Ford, the first president who came to the office through appointment rather than election, had replaced Spiro Agnew as vice president only eight months before. In a political scandal independent of the Nixon administration's wrongdoings in the Watergate affair, Agnew had been forced to resign in disgrace after he was charged with income tax evasion and political corruption. Exactly one month after Nixon announced his resignation, Ford issued the former president a "full, free and absolute" pardon for any crimes he committed while in office. The pardon was widely condemned at the time.

Decades later, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation presented its 2001 Profile in Courage Award to Gerald Ford for his 1974 pardon of Nixon. In pardoning Nixon, said the foundation, Ford placed his love of country ahead of his own political future and brought needed closure to the divisive Watergate affair. Ford left politics after losing the 1976 presidential election to Democrat Jimmy Carter. Ford died on December 26, 2006, at the age of 93.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - September 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 8:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Last week, I travelled from London to Stoke.

On the first day I travelled one half of the distance.

On day two, I travelled one third of the remaining distance.

On day three, I travelled three quarters of the remaining distance.

Yesterday I travelled one half of the remaining distance.

I now have 5 miles left to travel.

How far is it from Stoke to London in total?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - September 7 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 8:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - September 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 8:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Best Friends Forever 3
   Help the three friends escape each level by having them work together.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 7:00pm
"A perpetual holiday is a good working definition of hell."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Samuel Johnson

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 7:00pm
"Silence propagates itself, and the longer talk has been suspended, the more difficult it is to find anything to say."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Barbara Tober

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 7:00pm
"Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected from happening."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Greek Proverb

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 7:00pm
"First secure an independent income, then practice virtue."
Categories: Fun Stuff

tantamount

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 07, 2014 is:

tantamount • \TAN-tuh-mount\  • adjective
: equivalent in value, significance, or effect

Examples:
The boss had told Morris that he was being reassigned to the shipping department, and he knew that it was tantamount to a demotion.

"Mrs. Clinton declined an invitation to speak, organizers said. Democratic analysts said that was no surprise—for her to attend such a gathering would have been tantamount to announcing a presidential run, which she is not yet ready to do." — Sheryl Gay Stolberg, The New York Times, July 19, 2014

Did you know?
Tantamount comes from the Anglo-French phrase tant amunter, meaning "to amount to as much." This phrase comes from the Old French tant, meaning "so much" or "as much," and amounter, meaning "to ascend" or "to add up to." When tantamount first entered English, it was used similarly to the Anglo-French phrase, as a verb meaning "to be equivalent." "His not denying tant-amounteth to the affirming of the matter," wrote clergyman Thomas Fuller in 1659, for example. There was also a noun tantamount in the 17th century, but the adjective is the only commonly used form of the term nowadays.

Categories: Fun Stuff