Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 11

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 04/11/2015 - 8:38pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Antique Treasures
   Click matching pairs to remove them.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Billy Crystal

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/11/2015 - 7:00pm
"Women need a reason to have sex. Men just need a place."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Don Marquis

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/11/2015 - 7:00pm
"If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you; But if you really make them think, they'll hate you."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Douglas Adams

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/11/2015 - 7:00pm
"It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Marilyn Monroe

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/11/2015 - 7:00pm
"Hollywood is a place where they'll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss and fifty cents for your soul."
Categories: Fun Stuff

verdant

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 04/11/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 11, 2015 is:

verdant • \VER-dunt\  • adjective
1 a : green in tint or color b : green with growing plants 2 : unripe in experience or judgment : green

Examples:
The golf course was noted for its tricky hazards and lush, verdant borders along its fairways.

"Her favorite part of the room was the expansive window looking out over a verdant landscape of hills and distant mountains." — SDNews.com (San Diego), March 9, 2015

Did you know?
English speakers have been using verdant as a ripe synonym of green since the late 16th century, and as a descriptive term for inexperienced or naive people since the 1820s. (By contrast, the more experienced green has colored our language since well before the 12th century and was first applied to inexperienced people in the 1540s.) Verdant is derived from the Old French word for green, vert, which in turn is from Latin virēre, meaning "to be green." Today, vert is used in English as a word for green forest vegetation and the heraldic color green. Another descendant of virēre is the adjective virescent, meaning "beginning to be green."

Categories: Fun Stuff

April 11, 1814: Napoleon exiled to Elba

This Day in History - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1814, Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of France and one of the greatest military leaders in history, abdicates the throne, and, in the Treaty of Fontainebleau, is banished to the Mediterranean island of Elba.

The future emperor was born in Ajaccio, Corsica, on August 15, 1769. After attending military school, he fought during the French Revolution of 1789 and rapidly rose through the military ranks, leading French troops in a number of successful campaigns throughout Europe in the late 1700s. By 1799, he had established himself at the top of a military dictatorship. In 1804, he became emperor of France and continued to consolidate power through his military campaigns, so that by 1810 much of Europe came under his rule. Although Napoleon developed a reputation for being power-hungry and insecure, he is also credited with enacting a series of important political and social reforms that had a lasting impact on European society, including judiciary systems, constitutions, voting rights for all men and the end of feudalism. Additionally, he supported education, science and literature. His Code Napoleon, which codified key freedoms gained during the French Revolution, such as religious tolerance, remains the foundation of French civil law.

In 1812, thinking that Russia was plotting an alliance with England, Napoleon launched an invasion against the Russians that eventually ended with his troops retreating from Moscow and much of Europe uniting against him. In 1814, Napoleon’s broken forces gave up and Napoleon offered to step down in favor of his son. When this offer was rejected, he abdicated and was sent to Elba. In March 1815, he escaped his island exile and returned to Paris, where he regained supporters and reclaimed his emperor title, Napoleon I, in a period known as the Hundred Days. However, in June 1815, he was defeated at the bloody Battle of Waterloo. Napoleon’s defeat ultimately signaled the end of France’s domination of Europe. He abdicated for a second time and was exiled to the remote island of Saint Helena, in the southern Atlantic Ocean, where he lived out the rest of his days. He died at age 52 on May 5, 1821, possibly from stomach cancer, although some theories contend he was poisoned.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 10

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 8:24pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What number comes next in this sequence:

1 1 2 4 6 18 21 84 ==?==

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 10 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 8:24pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 10

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 8:24pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Underwater Adventure
   Take part in the underwater adventure, swimming in little submarine.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Robert Copeland

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 7:00pm
"To get something done, a committee should consist of no more than three men, two of whom are absent."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Peter Ustinov

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 7:00pm
"I'm convinced there's a small room in the attic of the Foreign Office where future diplomats are taught to stammer."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Oliver Wendell Holmes

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 7:00pm
"A person is always startled when he hears himself seriously called an old man for the first time."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Robert Bakker

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 7:00pm
"I want to find a voracious, small-minded predator and name it after the IRS."
Categories: Fun Stuff

juncture

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 04/10/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 10, 2015 is:

juncture • \JUNK-cher\  • noun
1 : joint, connection 2 : a point of time; especially : one made critical by a concurrence of circumstances

Examples:
"At this juncture in the editing process," said Philip, "it is important that all facts have been double-checked and sources verified."

"Obasohan's absence came at a critical juncture when the game got away from the Crimson Tide...." — Kevin Scarbinsky, AL.com, March 3, 2015

Did you know?
Juncture has many relatives in English—and some of them are easy to spot, whereas others are not so obvious. Juncture derives from the Latin verb jungere ("to join"), which gave us not only join and junction but also conjugal ("relating to marriage") and junta ("a group of persons controlling a government"). Jungere also has distant etymological connections to joust, jugular, juxtapose, yoga, and yoke. The use of juncture in English dates back to the 14th century. Originally, the word meant "a place where two or more things are joined," but by the 17th century it could also be used of an important point in time or of a stage in a process or activity.

Categories: Fun Stuff

April 10, 1866: ASPCA is founded

This Day in History - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 11:00pm

On April 10, 1866, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) is founded in New York City by philanthropist and diplomat Henry Bergh, 54.

In 1863, Bergh had been appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to a diplomatic post at the Russian court of Czar Alexander II. It was there that he was horrified to witness work horses beaten by their peasant drivers. En route back to America, a June 1865 visit to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in London awakened his determination to secure a charter not only to incorporate the ASPCA but to exercise the power to arrest and prosecute violators of the law.

Back in New York, Bergh pleaded on behalf of “these mute servants of mankind” at a February 8, 1866, meeting at Clinton Hall. He argued that protecting animals was an issue that crossed party lines and class boundaries. “This is a matter purely of conscience; it has no perplexing side issues,” he said. “It is a moral question in all its aspects.” The speech prompted a number of dignitaries to sign his “Declaration of the Rights of Animals.”

Bergh’s impassioned accounts of the horrors inflicted on animals convinced the New York State legislature to pass the charter incorporating the ASPCA on April 10, 1866. Nine days later, the first effective anti-cruelty law in the United States was passed, allowing the ASPCA to investigate complaints of animal cruelty and to make arrests.

Bergh was a hands-on reformer, becoming a familiar sight on the streets and in the courtrooms of New York. He regularly inspected slaughter houses, worked with police to close down dog- and rat-fighting pits and lectured in schools and to adult societies. In 1867, the ASPCA established and operated the nation’s first ambulance for horses.

As the pioneer and innovator of the humane movement, the ASPCA quickly became the model for more than 25 other humane organizations in the United States and Canada. And by the time Bergh died in 1888, 37 of the 38 states in the Union had passed anti-cruelty laws.

Bergh’s dramatic street rescues of mistreated horses and livestock served as a model for those trying to protect abused children. After Mary Ellen McCormack, 9, was found tied to a bed and brutally beaten by her foster parents in 1874, activists founded the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Bergh served as one of the group’s first vice presidents.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 9

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 8:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

During a crazy weekend of paintball, four friends were having great fun.

The paint came in blue, green, yellow and red.

Coincidentally, the four friends had T-shirts in those same colours.

Brenda used blue paint balls. The person in the green T-shirt used yellow paint balls. James was not wearing a red T-shirt. Diane used green paint balls and wore a blue T-shirt. Simon was the only person who used paint which was the same colour as his T-shirt.

Can you tell which colour paint they each used and the colour of their respective T-shirts?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 9 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 8:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 9

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 8:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Wordle
   Strategically build words with the letters that come at you one by one. Decide where to place them and when you use your cheats.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Leonard Louis Levinson

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 7:00pm
"A pessimist sees only the dark side of the clouds, and mopes; a philosopher sees both sides, and shrugs; an optimist doesn't see the clouds at all - he's walking on them."
Categories: Fun Stuff