Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 21 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 9:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 21

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 9:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Pipol Destinations
   Guide your 'Pipol' to their respective destinations through 20 levels.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

William Goldman

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 7:00pm
"This is my favorite book in all the world, though I have never read it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Karen Elizabeth Gordon

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 7:00pm
"Either I've been missing something or nothing has been going on."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Unknown

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 7:00pm
"Oh, come on. If you can't laugh at the walking dead, who can you laugh at?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Dick Cavett

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 7:00pm
"As long as people will accept crap, it will be financially profitable to dispense it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

fiduciary

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 21, 2014 is:

fiduciary • \fuh-DOO-shee-air-ee\  • adjective
1 : involving a confidence or trust 2 : held or holding in trust for another

Examples:
"While bank trust departments have a fiduciary duty to file claims on behalf of their clients, many are overworked and understaffed." — Business Wire, September 17, 2010

"The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals decided a case in which it addressed a variety of fiduciary breaches alleged by employees participating in an employer’s 401(k) plans." — Peter K. Bradley, Anita Costello Greer, Michael J. Flanagan, Richard W. Kaiser, Arthur A. Marrapese III and Ryan M. Murphy, Lexology.com, May 30, 2014

Did you know?
Fiduciary relationships often concern money, but the word "fiduciary" does not, in and of itself, suggest financial matters. Rather, "fiduciary" applies to any situation in which one person justifiably places confidence and trust in someone else and seeks that person's help or advice in some matter. The attorney-client relationship is a fiduciary one, for example, because the client trusts the attorney to act in the best interest of the client at all times. "Fiduciary" can also be used as a noun for the person who acts in a fiduciary capacity, and "fiduciarily" or "fiducially" can be called upon if you are in need of an adverb. The words are all faithful to their origin: Latin "fidere," which means "to trust."

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 21, 1861: The First Battle of Bull Run

This Day in History - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 11:00pm

In the first major land battle of the Civil War, a large Union force under General Irvin McDowell is routed by a Confederate army under General Pierre G.T. Beauregard.

Three months after the Civil War erupted at Fort Sumter, Union military command still believed that the Confederacy could be crushed quickly and with little loss of life. In July, this overconfidence led to a premature offensive into northern Virginia by General McDowell. Searching out the Confederate forces, McDowell led 34,000 troops--mostly inexperienced and poorly trained militiamen--toward the railroad junction of Manassas, located just 30 miles from Washington, D.C. Alerted to the Union advance, General Beauregard massed some 20,000 troops there and was soon joined by General Joseph Johnston, who brought some 9,000 more troops by railroad.

On the morning of July 21, hearing of the proximity of the two opposing forces, hundreds of civilians--men, women, and children--turned out to watch the first major battle of the Civil War. The fighting commenced with three Union divisions crossing the Bull Run stream, and the Confederate flank was driven back to Henry House Hill. However, at this strategic location, Beauregard had fashioned a strong defensive line anchored by a brigade of Virginia infantry under General Thomas J. Jackson. Firing from a concealed slope, Jackson's men repulsed a series of Federal charges, winning Jackson his famous nickname "Stonewall."

Meanwhile, Confederate cavalry under J.E.B. Stuart captured the Union artillery, and Beauregard ordered a counterattack on the exposed Union right flank. The rebels came charging down the hill, yelling furiously, and McDowell's line was broken, forcing his troops in a hasty retreat across Bull Run. The retreat soon became an unorganized flight, and supplies littered the road back to Washington. Union forces endured a loss of 3,000 men killed, wounded, or missing in action while the Confederates suffered 2,000 casualties. The scale of this bloodshed horrified not only the frightened spectators at Bull Run but also the U.S. government in Washington, which was faced with an uncertain military strategy in quelling the "Southern insurrection."

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 20

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 9:34pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Start with a number larger than 0, square it, add 4, double, take away 3, times 4 and finally subtract the original number.

If you were now left with 20, what number did you start with?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 20 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 9:34pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 20

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 9:34pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Common Answers
   Compete with the rest of the world by predicting the most common answers to 10 easy questions.
[Played on the BrainBashers Puzzle/Illusion website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Miguel de Cervantes

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"Facts are the enemy of truth."
Categories: Fun Stuff

William Jennings Bryan

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"No one can earn a million dollars honestly."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Fran Lebowitz

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"The opposite of talking isn't listening. The opposite of talking is waiting."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Kin Hubbard

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"Classical music is the kind we keep thinking will turn into a tune."
Categories: Fun Stuff

big data

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 20, 2014 is:

big data • \BIG-DAY-tuh\  • noun
: an accumulation of data that is too large and complex for processing by traditional database management tools

Examples:
"The age of big data has driven advances in technology that make it possible to collect, store, and transmit nearly infinite amounts of information." — Sean Lahman, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, May 30, 2014

"In other words, how do you use big data about people and things productively and profitably without risking a loss of trust and business patronage from consumers who are beginning to question it?" — Mary Shacklett, TechRepublic.com, June 16, 2014

Did you know?
"Big data" is a new addition to our language, but exactly how new is not an easy matter to determine. A 1980 paper by Charles Tilly provides an early documented use of "big data," but Tilly wasn't using the word in the exact same way we use it today; rather, he used the phrase "big-data people" to refer to historians engaged in data-rich fields such as cliometrics. Today, "big data" can refer to large data sets or to systems and solutions developed to manage such large accumulations of data, as well as for the branch of computing devoted to this development. Francis X. Diebold, a University of Pennsylvania economist, who has written a paper exploring the origin of big data as a term, a phenomenon, and a field of study, believes the term "probably originated in lunch-table conversations at Silicon Graphics Inc. (SGI) in the mid 1990s…."

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 20, 1969: Armstrong walks on moon

This Day in History - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 11:00pm

At 10:56 p.m. EDT, American astronaut Neil Armstrong, 240,000 miles from Earth, speaks these words to more than a billion people listening at home: "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." Stepping off the lunar landing module Eagle, Armstrong became the first human to walk on the surface of the moon.

The American effort to send astronauts to the moon has its origins in a famous appeal President John F. Kennedy made to a special joint session of Congress on May 25, 1961: "I believe this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth." At the time, the United States was still trailing the Soviet Union in space developments, and Cold War-era America welcomed Kennedy's bold proposal.

In 1966, after five years of work by an international team of scientists and engineers, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted the first unmanned Apollo mission, testing the structural integrity of the proposed launch vehicle and spacecraft combination. Then, on January 27, 1967, tragedy struck at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, when a fire broke out during a manned launch-pad test of the Apollo spacecraft and Saturn rocket. Three astronauts were killed in the fire.

Despite the setback, NASA and its thousands of employees forged ahead, and in October 1968, Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo mission, orbited Earth and successfully tested many of the sophisticated systems needed to conduct a moon journey and landing. In December of the same year, Apollo 8 took three astronauts to the dark side of the moon and back, and in March 1969 Apollo 9 tested the lunar module for the first time while in Earth orbit. Then in May, the three astronauts of Apollo 10 took the first complete Apollo spacecraft around the moon in a dry run for the scheduled July landing mission.

At 9:32 a.m. on July 16, with the world watching, Apollo 11 took off from Kennedy Space Center with astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin Jr., and Michael Collins aboard. Armstrong, a 38-year-old civilian research pilot, was the commander of the mission. After traveling 240,000 miles in 76 hours, Apollo 11 entered into a lunar orbit on July 19. The next day, at 1:46 p.m., the lunar module Eagle, manned by Armstrong and Aldrin, separated from the command module, where Collins remained. Two hours later, the Eagle began its descent to the lunar surface, and at 4:18 p.m. the craft touched down on the southwestern edge of the Sea of Tranquility. Armstrong immediately radioed to Mission Control in Houston, Texas, a famous message: "The Eagle has landed."

At 10:39 p.m., five hours ahead of the original schedule, Armstrong opened the hatch of the lunar module. As he made his way down the lunar module's ladder, a television camera attached to the craft recorded his progress and beamed the signal back to Earth, where hundreds of millions watched in great anticipation. At 10:56 p.m., Armstrong spoke his famous quote, which he later contended was slightly garbled by his microphone and meant to be "that's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind." He then planted his left foot on the gray, powdery surface, took a cautious step forward, and humanity had walked on the moon.

"Buzz" Aldrin joined him on the moon's surface at 11:11 p.m., and together they took photographs of the terrain, planted a U.S. flag, ran a few simple scientific tests, and spoke with President Richard M. Nixon via Houston. By 1:11 a.m. on July 21, both astronauts were back in the lunar module and the hatch was closed. The two men slept that night on the surface of the moon, and at 1:54 p.m. the Eagle began its ascent back to the command module. Among the items left on the surface of the moon was a plaque that read: "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot on the moon--July 1969 A.D--We came in peace for all mankind."

At 5:35 p.m., Armstrong and Aldrin successfully docked and rejoined Collins, and at 12:56 a.m. on July 22 Apollo 11 began its journey home, safely splashing down in the Pacific Ocean at 12:51 p.m. on July 24.

There would be five more successful lunar landing missions, and one unplanned lunar swing-by, Apollo 13. The last men to walk on the moon, astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt of the Apollo 17 mission, left the lunar surface on December 14, 1972. The Apollo program was a costly and labor intensive endeavor, involving an estimated 400,000 engineers, technicians, and scientists, and costing $24 billion (close to $100 billion in today's dollars). The expense was justified by Kennedy's 1961 mandate to beat the Soviets to the moon, and after the feat was accomplished ongoing missions lost their viability.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 9:20pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Add a single straight line to make this equation true - the equals sign remains untouched.

5 + 5 + 5 = 550

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 19 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 9:20pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 9:20pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

The Final Frontier
   Retrieve enough cargo for Iron Maiden to perform the loudest gig in the Universe.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff