Fun Stuff

Peter McArthur

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 01/15/2015 - 6:00pm
"A satirist is a man who discovers unpleasant things about himself and then says them about other people."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Calvin Coolidge

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 01/15/2015 - 6:00pm
"No man ever listened himself out of a job."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Alvin Toffler

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 01/15/2015 - 6:00pm
"The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Brobdingnagian

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Thu, 01/15/2015 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 15, 2015 is:

Brobdingnagian • \brob-ding-NAG-ee-un\  • adjective
: marked by tremendous size

Examples:
Our little dog was frightened by the Brobdingnagian proportions of the statues in the park.

"In a clever new show at the Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Amy Toscani has mined thrift-store trinkets for inspiration and body parts for Brobdingnagian sculptures, whose huge scale dwarfs viewers." — Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), April 26, 2014

Did you know?
In Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, Brobdingnag is the name of a land that is populated by a race of human giants "as tall as an ordinary spire steeple." In Gulliver's first close-up encounter with the giants, he is attempting to get past a stile of which every step is six feet high when a group of field-workers approach with strides ten yards long and reaping hooks as large as six scythes. Their voices he at first mistakes for thunder. Swift's book fired the imagination of the public and within two years of the 1726 publication of the story, people had begun using Brobdingnagian to refer to anything of unusually large size. (Swift himself had used Brobdingnagian as a noun to refer to the inhabitants of Brobdingnag.)

Categories: Fun Stuff

January 15, 1967: Packers face Chiefs in first Super Bowl

This Day in History - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1967, at the Los Angeles Coliseum, the Green Bay Packers beat the Kansas City Chiefs in the first-ever world championship game of American football.

In the mid-1960s, the intense competition for players and fans between the National Football League (NFL) and the upstart American Football League (AFL) led to talks of a possible merger. It was decided that the winners of each league's championship would meet each year in a single game to determine the "world champion of football."

In that historic first game--played before a non-sell-out crowd of 61,946 people--Green Bay scored three touchdowns in the second half to defeat Kansas City 35-10. Led by MVP quarterback Bart Starr, the Packers benefited from Max McGee's stellar receiving and a key interception by safety Willie Wood. For their win, each member of the Packers collected $15,000: the largest single-game share in the history of team sports.

Postseason college games were known as "bowl" games, and AFL founder Lamar Hunt suggested that the new pro championship be called the "Super Bowl." The term was officially introduced in 1969, along with roman numerals to designate the individual games. In 1970, the NFL and AFL merged into one league with two conferences, each with 13 teams. Since then, the Super Bowl has been a face-off between the winners of the American Football Conference (AFC) and the National Football Conference (NFC) for the NFL championship and the coveted Vince Lombardi Trophy, named for the legendary Packers coach who guided his team to victory in the first two Super Bowls.

Super Bowl Sunday has become an unofficial American holiday, complete with parties, betting pools and excessive consumption of food and drink. On average, 80 to 90 million people are tuned into the game on TV at any given moment, while some 130-140 million watch at least some part of the game. The commercials shown during the game have become an attraction in themselves, with TV networks charging as much as $2.5 million for a 30-second spot and companies making more expensive, high-concept ads each year. The game itself has more than once been upstaged by its elaborate pre-game or halftime entertainment, most recently in 2004 when Janet Jackson's infamous "wardrobe malfunction" resulted in a $225,000 fine for the TV network airing the game, CBS, and tighter controls on televised indecency.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 6:00pm
"There are people who think that everything one does with a serious face is sensible."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Martin Luther King Jr.

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 6:00pm
"In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 6:00pm
"Music makes one feel so romantic - at least it always gets on one's nerves - which is the same thing nowadays."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Alfred Hitchcock

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 6:00pm
"This paperback is very interesting, but I find it will never replace a hardcover book - it makes a very poor doorstop."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - January 14

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 5:58pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find the hidden country in the following sentence:

Didn't Wilbur make a lovely chocolate cake last week?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - January 14 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 5:58pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - January 14

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 5:58pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Frantic
   Can you find the hidden button in time?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

zillionaire

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Wed, 01/14/2015 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 14, 2015 is:

zillionaire • \zil-yuh-NAIR\  • noun
: an immeasurably wealthy person

Examples:
"Unless you're a zillionaire, it's practically impossible to find an affordable and spacious place to live in the city," said Beth.

"I tell the interns who come to work at OppenheimerFunds each summer, 'If you come to Wall St. to become a zillionaire, you probably won't.' If that's someone's only motivation, it won't work." — Arthur Steinmetz, LinkedIn Pulse, November 20, 2014

Did you know?
The word millionaire has been used in English to designate a person who is worth a million pounds or dollars, depending on the side of the ocean, since 1786. We borrowed the word straight from the French, whose millions, of course, were in francs. Millionaire eventually no longer sufficed, and English speakers coined billionaire in 1844. Soon afterwards came multimillionaire, followed by multibillionaire in the early 1900s. Once zillion was made up as a humorous word for an indeterminately large number (patterned on million and billion), it was only a matter of time before zillionaire came along as a humorous word for a person of seemingly immeasurable wealth. Zillion and zillionaire aren't used in the most formal of writing, but they have found their way into plenty of serious publications.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - January 13

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 11:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

A man bought a motor cycle for £160.00, sold it for £170.00, then bought it back for £180.00, and finally sold it for £190.00. How much did he make or lose on this series of transactions?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - January 13 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 11:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - January 13

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 11:48pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

A Good Hunch
   Two time travelling goats are trying to reach two separate exits. You have to use co-operation and a little time travelling to help them.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

January 14, 1875: Albert Schweitzer born

This Day in History - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 11:00pm

The theologian, musician, philosopher and Nobel Prize-winning physician Albert Schweitzer is born on this day in 1875 in Upper-Alsace, Germany (now Haut-Rhin, France).

The son and grandson of ministers, Schweitzer studied theology and philosophy at the universities of Strasbourg, Paris and Berlin. After working as a pastor, he entered medical school in 1905 with the dream of becoming a missionary in Africa. Schweitzer was also an acclaimed concert organist who played professional engagements to earn money for his education. By the time he received his M.D. in 1913, the overachieving Schweitzer had published several books, including the influential The Quest for the Historical Jesus and a book on the composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

Medical degree in hand, Schweitzer and his wife, Helene Bresslau, moved to French Equatorial Africa where he founded a hospital at Lambarene (modern-day Gabon). When World War I broke out, the German-born Schweitzers were sent to a French internment camp as prisoners of war. Released in 1918, they returned to Lambarene in 1924. Over the next three decades, Schweitzer made frequent visits to Europe to lecture on culture and ethics. His philosophy revolved around the concept of what he called "reverence for life"--the idea that all life must be respected and loved, and that humans should enter into a personal, spiritual relationship with the universe and all its creations. This reverence for life, according to Schweitzer, would naturally lead humans to live a life of service to others.

Schweitzer won widespread praise for putting his uplifting theory into practice at his hospital in Africa, where he treated many patients with leprosy and the dreaded African sleeping sickness. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1952, Schweitzer used his $33,000 award to start a leprosarium at Lambarene. From the early 1950s until his death in 1965, Schweitzer spoke and wrote tirelessly about his opposition to nuclear tests and nuclear weapons, adding his voice to those of fellow Nobelists Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell. 

Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Levant

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 6:00pm
"Behind the phony tinsel of Hollywood lies the real tinsel."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Russell Baker

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 6:00pm
"Inanimate objects are classified scientifically into three major categories - those that don't work, those that break down and those that get lost."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Totie Fields

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 01/13/2015 - 6:00pm
"I've been on a diet for two weeks and all I've lost is two weeks."
Categories: Fun Stuff