Fun Stuff

J. Robert Oppenheimer

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"Any man whose errors take ten years to correct is quite a man."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Lenin

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"A lie told often enough becomes the truth."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Friedrich Nietzsche

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"Only sick music makes money today."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 20

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 6:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

The results for a recent Chess tournament between five close rivals is described below:

Dave finished before Adam.
Eileen finished after Betty.
Adam finished before Charlie.
Eileen finished after Dave.
Betty finished before Adam.
Dave finished after Betty.
Charlie finished before Eileen.

Who finished where?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 20 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 6:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 20

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 6:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Common Answers
   Compete with the rest of the world by predicting the most common answers to 10 easy questions.
[Played on the BrainBashers Puzzle/Illusion website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

impunity

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 20, 2014 is:

impunity • \im-PYOO-nuh-tee\  • noun
: exemption or freedom from punishment, harm, or loss

Examples:
Penalties for breaking the law can be made harsher, but without extra funding for its enforcement, people will continue to violate it with impunity.

"Carlos Zarate, a congressman who sits on the Philippine House of Representatives' Human Rights Committee, said in an interview Tuesday that the arrest of General Palparan did not signal an end to the problem of security forces committing abuses with impunity." — Floyd Whaley, The New York Times, August 13, 2014

Did you know?
Impunity (like the words pain, penal, and punish) traces to the Latin noun poena, meaning "punishment." The Latin word, in turn, came from Greek poinē, meaning "payment" or "penalty." People acting with impunity have prompted use of the word since the 1500s, as in this 1660 example by Englishman Roger Coke: "This unlimited power of doing anything with impunity, will only beget a confidence in kings of doing what they list [desire]." While royals may act with impunity more easily than others, the word impunity can be applied to the lowliest of beings as well as the loftiest: "Certain beetles have learned to detoxify [willow] leaves in their digestive tract so they can eat them with impunity" (Smithsonian, September 1986).

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 20, 1947: Congress investigates Reds in Hollywood

This Day in History - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 11:00pm

On October 20, 1947, the notorious Red Scare kicks into high gear in Washington, as a Congressional committee begins investigating Communist influence in one of the world's richest and most glamorous communities: Hollywood.

After World War II, the Cold War began to heat up between the world's two superpowers—the United States and the communist-controlled Soviet Union. In Washington, conservative watchdogs worked to out communists in government before setting their sights on alleged "Reds" in the famously liberal movie industry. In an investigation that began in October 1947, the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) grilled a number of prominent witnesses, asking bluntly "Are you or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?" Whether out of patriotism or fear, some witnesses—including director Elia Kazan, actors Gary Cooper and Robert Taylor and studio honchos Walt Disney and Jack Warner—gave the committee names of colleagues they suspected of being communists.

A small group known as the "Hollywood Ten" resisted, complaining that the hearings were illegal and violated their First Amendment rights. They were all convicted of obstructing the investigation and served jail terms. Pressured by Congress, the Hollywood establishment started a blacklist policy, banning the work of about 325 screenwriters, actors and directors who had not been cleared by the committee. Those blacklisted included composer Aaron Copland, writers Dashiell Hammett, Lillian Hellman and Dorothy Parker, playwright Arthur Miller and actor and filmmaker Orson Welles.

Some of the blacklisted writers used pseudonyms to continue working, while others wrote scripts that were credited to other writer friends. Starting in the early 1960s, after the downfall of Senator Joseph McCarthy, the most public face of anti-communism, the ban began to lift slowly. In 1997, the Writers' Guild of America unanimously voted to change the writing credits of 23 films made during the blacklist period, reversing—but not erasing—some of the damage done during the Red Scare.

Categories: Fun Stuff

John Blake

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"The world tolerates conceit from those who are successful, but not from anybody else."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Alfred Hitchcock

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"Television has done much for psychiatry by spreading information about it, as well as contributing to the need for it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Joey Adams

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"A psychiatrist is a fellow who asks you a lot of expensive questions your wife asks for nothing."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Will Rogers

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"The more you read and observe about this Politics thing, you got to admit that each party is worse than the other. The one that's out always looks the best."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 6:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What comes next in this sequence:

Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron ==?==

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 19 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 6:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 6:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Keep Ups
   How long can you keep the ping-pong ball in the air?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

esculent

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 19, 2014 is:

esculent • \ESS-kyuh-lunt\  • adjective
: edible

Examples:
Morels are esculent mushrooms and are delicious, but be warned that there are also false morels, which are poisonous.

"The berry, which has two to three times more antioxidants than blueberries, falls from what the Brazilians call 'The Tree of Life', with about 90 per cent being inedible, but the esculent skin of the aҫaí tastes like a vibrant blend of berries and dark chocolate." — Sarah O'Brien, Newcastle Herald (Australia), December 14, 2013

Did you know?
One appealing thing about esculent is that this word, which comes from the Latin for food (esca), has been around for over 375 years. If we give you just one more tidbit of etymology—that esca is from Latin edere, which means "to eat"—can you pick which of the following words is NOT related to esculent? Comestible, edacious, edible, escalade, escarole, or obese. Comestible (meaning "edible"), edacious (meaning "voracious"), edible, escarole (a type of salad green), and obese are all descendants of edere. Only escalade (meaning "an act of scaling walls") doesn't belong on the list. It descends from the Italian scalare, meaning "to scale."

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 19, 1781: Victory at Yorktown

This Day in History - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 11:00pm

Hopelessly trapped at Yorktown, Virginia, British General Lord Cornwallis surrenders 8,000 British soldiers and seamen to a larger Franco-American force, effectively bringing an end to the American Revolution.

Lord Cornwallis was one of the most capable British generals of the American Revolution. In 1776, he drove General George Washington's Patriots forces out of New Jersey, and in 1780 he won a stunning victory over General Horatio Gates' Patriot army at Camden, South Carolina. Cornwallis' subsequent invasion of North Carolina was less successful, however, and in April 1781 he led his weary and battered troops toward the Virginia coast, where he could maintain seaborne lines of communication with the large British army of General Henry Clinton in New York City. After conducting a series of raids against towns and plantations in Virginia, Cornwallis settled in the tidewater town of Yorktown in August. The British immediately began fortifying the town and the adjacent promontory of Gloucester Point across the York River.

General George Washington instructed the Marquis de Lafayette, who was in Virginia with an American army of around 5,000 men, to block Cornwallis' escape from Yorktown by land. In the meantime, Washington's 2,500 troops in New York were joined by a French army of 4,000 men under the Count de Rochambeau. Washington and Rochambeau made plans to attack Cornwallis with the assistance of a large French fleet under the Count de Grasse, and on August 21 they crossed the Hudson River to march south to Yorktown. Covering 200 miles in 15 days, the allied force reached the head of Chesapeake Bay in early September.

Meanwhile, a British fleet under Admiral Thomas Graves failed to break French naval superiority at the Battle of Virginia Capes on September 5, denying Cornwallis his expected reinforcements. Beginning September 14, de Grasse transported Washington and Rochambeau's men down the Chesapeake to Virginia, where they joined Lafayette and completed the encirclement of Yorktown on September 28. De Grasse landed another 3,000 French troops carried by his fleet. During the first two weeks of October, the 14,000 Franco-American troops gradually overcame the fortified British positions with the aid of de Grasse's warships. A large British fleet carrying 7,000 men set out to rescue Cornwallis, but it was too late.

On October 19, General Cornwallis surrendered 7,087 officers and men, 900 seamen, 144 cannons, 15 galleys, a frigate, and 30 transport ships. Pleading illness, he did not attend the surrender ceremony, but his second-in-command, General Charles O'Hara, carried Cornwallis' sword to the American and French commanders. As the British and Hessian troops marched out to surrender, the British bands played the song "The World Turned Upside Down."

Although the war persisted on the high seas and in other theaters, the Patriot victory at Yorktown effectively ended fighting in the American colonies. Peace negotiations began in 1782, and on September 3, 1783, the Treaty of Paris was signed, formally recognizing the United States as a free and independent nation after eight years of war.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Sophocles

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"The keenest sorrow is to recognize ourselves as the sole cause of all our adversities."
Categories: Fun Stuff

H. L. Mencken

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"In the United States, doing good has come to be, like patriotism, a favorite device of persons with something to sell."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Thomas H. Huxley

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"Try to learn something about everything and everything about something."
Categories: Fun Stuff