Fun Stuff

Herb Caen

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 11/09/2014 - 6:00pm
"Cockroaches and socialites are the only things that can stay up all night and eat anything."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Albert Einstein

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 11/09/2014 - 6:00pm
"Imagination is more important than knowledge..."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Paul Valery

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 11/09/2014 - 6:00pm
"Politics is the art of preventing people from taking part in affairs which properly concern them."
Categories: Fun Stuff

injunction

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 11/09/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 09, 2014 is:

injunction • \in-JUNK-shun\  • noun
1 : the act or an instance of enjoining : order, admonition 2 : a court order requiring a party to do or refrain from doing a specified act

Examples:
The family gathered in the room to hear the matriarch's dying injunctions.

"A Superior Court judge Tuesday issued a preliminary injunction preventing a Santa Fe Springs wastewater plant from removing sludge from tanks … until a plan has been approved by the local air quality district." — Mike Sprague, Whittier Daily News (California), October 7, 2014

Did you know?
Injunction derives, via Anglo-French and Late Latin, from the Latin verb injungere, which in turn derives from jungere, meaning "to join." Like our verb enjoin, injungere means "to direct or impose by authoritative order or with urgent admonition." (Not surprisingly, enjoin is also a descendant of injungere.) Injunction has been around in English since at least the 15th century, when it began life as a word meaning "authoritative command." In the 16th century it developed a legal second sense applying to a court order. It has also been used as a synonym of conjunction, another jungere descendant meaning "union," but that sense is extremely rare.

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 9, 1938: Nazis launch Kristallnacht

This Day in History - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1938, in an event that would foreshadow the Holocaust, German Nazis launch a campaign of terror against Jewish people and their homes and businesses in Germany and Austria. The violence, which continued through November 10 and was later dubbed "Kristallnacht," or "Night of Broken Glass," after the countless smashed windows of Jewish-owned establishments, left approximately 100 Jews dead, 7,500 Jewish businesses damaged and hundreds of synagogues, homes, schools and graveyards vandalized. An estimated 30,000 Jewish men were arrested, many of whom were then sent to concentration camps for several months; they were released when they promised to leave Germany. Kristallnacht represented a dramatic escalation of the campaign started by Adolf Hitler in 1933 when he became chancellor to purge Germany of its Jewish population.

The Nazis used the murder of a low-level German diplomat in Paris by a 17-year-old Polish Jew as an excuse to carry out the Kristallnacht attacks. On November 7, 1938, Ernst vom Rath was shot outside the German embassy by Herschel Grynszpan, who wanted revenge for his parents' sudden deportation from Germany to Poland, along with tens of thousands of other Polish Jews. Following vom Rath's death, Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels ordered German storm troopers to carry out violent riots disguised as "spontaneous demonstrations" against Jewish citizens. Local police and fire departments were told not to interfere. In the face of all the devastation, some Jews, including entire families, committed suicide.

In the aftermath of Kristallnacht, the Nazis blamed the Jews and fined them 1 billion marks (or $400 million in 1938 dollars) for vom Rath's death. As repayment, the government seized Jewish property and kept insurance money owed to Jewish people. In its quest to create a master Aryan race, the Nazi government enacted further discriminatory policies that essentially excluded Jews from all aspects of public life.

Over 100,000 Jews fled Germany for other countries after Kristallnacht. The international community was outraged by the violent events of November 9 and 10. Some countries broke off diplomatic relations in protest, but the Nazis suffered no serious consequences, leading them to believe they could get away with the mass murder that was the Holocaust, in which an estimated 6 million European Jews died.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 10:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What letter comes next in this sequence:

A O E A O T F ==?==

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 8 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 10:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 10:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Rescue Bear
   Your mission is to save the bears.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Cullen Hightower

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"Laughing at our mistakes can lengthen our own life. Laughing at someone else's can shorten it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Mark Twain

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Thomas Jefferson

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"I do not take a single newspaper, nor read one a month, and I feel myself infinitely the happier for it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Jack Benny

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"I don't deserve this award, but I have arthritis and I don't deserve that either."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Byzantine

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 11/08/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 08, 2014 is:

Byzantine • \BIZ-un-teen\  • adjective
1 : of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient city of Byzantium or of the Byzantine Empire 2 : of or relating to the churches using a traditional Greek rite and subject to Eastern canon law 3 often not capitalized : of, relating to, or characterized by a devious and usually surreptitious manner of operation 4 often not capitalized : intricately involved : labyrinthine

Examples:
A decade of reckless investments and byzantine power struggles eventually led to the company's collapse.

"But [Ira] Glass is surely not alone in finding the Bard hard: all those byzantine complexities of plot, all that highly wrought language." — Rebecca Mead, New Yorker, October 6, 2014

Did you know?
Today, the city that lies on the Bosporus Strait in Turkey is named Istanbul, but it was once known as Constantinople (a name given to it when it became capital of the Eastern Roman, or Byzantine, Empire), and in ancient times, it was called Byzantium. Its history is exotic—filled with mystics, wars, and political infighting—and the word Byzantine (from Late Latin Byzantinus, for "native of Byzantium") became synonymous with anything characteristic of the city or empire, from architecture to intrigue. The figurative sense of labyrinthine deviousness first appeared in the late 1930s. It was popularized by its frequent use in reference to the Soviet Union, whose secrecy and despotism were equated by Westerners with what went on in the old Byzantine Empire.

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 8, 1895: German scientist discovers X-rays

This Day in History - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1895, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen (1845-1923) becomes the first person to observe X-rays, a significant scientific advancement that would ultimately benefit a variety of fields, most of all medicine, by making the invisible visible. Rontgen's discovery occurred accidentally in his Wurzburg, Germany, lab, where he was testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass when he noticed a glow coming from a nearby chemically coated screen. He dubbed the rays that caused this glow X-rays because of their unknown nature.

X-rays are electromagnetic energy waves that act similarly to light rays, but at wavelengths approximately 1,000 times shorter than those of light. Rontgen holed up in his lab and conducted a series of experiments to better understand his discovery. He learned that X-rays penetrate human flesh but not higher-density substances such as bone or lead and that they can be photographed.

Rontgen's discovery was labeled a medical miracle and X-rays soon became an important diagnostic tool in medicine, allowing doctors to see inside the human body for the first time without surgery. In 1897, X-rays were first used on a military battlefield, during the Balkan War, to find bullets and broken bones inside patients.

Scientists were quick to realize the benefits of X-rays, but slower to comprehend the harmful effects of radiation. Initially, it was believed X-rays passed through flesh as harmlessly as light. However, within several years, researchers began to report cases of burns and skin damage after exposure to X-rays, and in 1904, Thomas Edison's assistant, Clarence Dally, who had worked extensively with X-rays, died of skin cancer. Dally's death caused some scientists to begin taking the risks of radiation more seriously, but they still weren't fully understood. During the 1930s, 40s and 50s, in fact, many American shoe stores featured shoe-fitting fluoroscopes that used to X-rays to enable customers to see the bones in their feet; it wasn't until the 1950s that this practice was determined to be risky business. Wilhelm Rontgen received numerous accolades for his work, including the first Nobel Prize in physics in 1901, yet he remained modest and never tried to patent his discovery. Today, X-ray technology is widely used in medicine, material analysis and devices such as airport security scanners.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 9:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

From me to you with LOVE: how many times does the word LOVE appear in this grid?

L V E V O L E E V O L E V O L
O O V E O O E V O L L V V O L
V L O V E V V O O O L O V E O
E O L O V E O L V L E L E V V
E V O L E E L E O L E V O L E
V V O L V V O L O V O L O V E
O V O L O O V V O L E L O L E
L V O L L L E L O V E L O V E
E V L O V E V V O L O V E V E
E E L L E V O L O E E V O L E
L V V O L L L V L L V L L L V
L O E V V O E O O E V O L O O
O L V E V E V V V E V O L V L
V O O E L E E E E E L O V E O
E V L E V O L O V E V O L O V

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 7 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 9:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 9:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Cross Colours
   Starting with a grid of green, turn the grid red.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Anais Nin

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 6:00pm
"We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Eleanor Roosevelt

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 6:00pm
"I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then live with that decision."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Peter De Vries

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 11/07/2014 - 6:00pm
"There are times when parenthood seems nothing but feeding the mouth that bites you."
Categories: Fun Stuff