Fun Stuff

Quentin Crisp

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 6:00pm
"Health consists of having the same diseases as one's neighbors."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Hunter S. Thompson

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 6:00pm
"I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Harry S Truman

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 6:00pm
"It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit."
Categories: Fun Stuff

impervious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 07, 2014 is:

impervious • \im-PER-vee-us\  • adjective
1 a : not allowing entrance or passage : impenetrable b : not capable of being damaged or harmed 2 : not capable of being affected or disturbed

Examples:
Jane remains impervious to any attempt to reason with her; she’s made up her mind and nothing we can say will lead her to change it.

"Boot trends come and go every fall—over-the-knee, ankle, combat, wedges—but one boot remains, impervious to passing fads: the cowboy boot." — Bethany Ao, The News & Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina), November 5, 2014

Did you know?
The English language is far from impervious, and, of course, a great many Latinate terms have entered it throughout its history. Impervious is one of the many that broke through in the 17th century. It comes from the Latin impervius, which adds the prefix im- to pervius, meaning "passable" or "penetrable." Pervius—which is also the source of the relatively uncommon English word pervious, meaning "accessible" or "permeable"—comes from per-, meaning "through," and via, meaning "way."

Categories: Fun Stuff

December 7, 1941: Pearl Harbor bombed

This Day in History - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 11:00pm

At 7:55 a.m. Hawaii time, a Japanese dive bomber bearing the red symbol of the Rising Sun of Japan on its wings appears out of the clouds above the island of Oahu. A swarm of 360 Japanese warplanes followed, descending on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in a ferocious assault. The surprise attack struck a critical blow against the U.S. Pacific fleet and drew the United States irrevocably into World War II.

With diplomatic negotiations with Japan breaking down, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his advisers knew that an imminent Japanese attack was probable, but nothing had been done to increase security at the important naval base at Pearl Harbor. It was Sunday morning, and many military personnel had been given passes to attend religious services off base. At 7:02 a.m., two radar operators spotted large groups of aircraft in flight toward the island from the north, but, with a flight of B-17s expected from the United States at the time, they were told to sound no alarm. Thus, the Japanese air assault came as a devastating surprise to the naval base.

Much of the Pacific fleet was rendered useless: Five of eight battleships, three destroyers, and seven other ships were sunk or severely damaged, and more than 200 aircraft were destroyed. A total of 2,400 Americans were killed and 1,200 were wounded, many while valiantly attempting to repulse the attack. Japan's losses were some 30 planes, five midget submarines, and fewer than 100 men. Fortunately for the United States, all three Pacific fleet carriers were out at sea on training maneuvers. These giant aircraft carriers would have their revenge against Japan six months later at the Battle of Midway, reversing the tide against the previously invincible Japanese navy in a spectacular victory.

The day after Pearl Harbor was bombed, President Roosevelt appeared before a joint session of Congress and declared, "Yesterday, December 7, 1941--a date which will live in infamy--the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan." After a brief and forceful speech, he asked Congress to approve a resolution recognizing the state of war between the United States and Japan. The Senate voted for war against Japan by 82 to 0, and the House of Representatives approved the resolution by a vote of 388 to 1. The sole dissenter was Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana, a devout pacifist who had also cast a dissenting vote against the U.S. entrance into World War I. Three days later, Germany and Italy declared war against the United States, and the U.S. government responded in kind.

The American contribution to the successful Allied war effort spanned four long years and cost more than 400,000 American lives.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - December 6

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 9:03pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What common word has 4 vowels, one after the other?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 6 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 9:03pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 6

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 9:03pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Ocean Express
   With a twist. Fill the cargo ships with shapes.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Friedrich Nietzsche

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 6:00pm
"The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends."
Categories: Fun Stuff

James Thurber

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 6:00pm
"The only rules comedy can tolerate are those of taste, and the only limitations those of libel."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Gertrude Stein

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 6:00pm
"In the United States there is more space where nobody is than where anybody is. That is what makes America what it is."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Thomas Carlyle

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 6:00pm
"What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books."
Categories: Fun Stuff

bouleversement

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 06, 2014 is:

bouleversement • \bool-vair-suh-MAHNG\  • noun
1 : reversal 2 : a violent disturbance : disorder

Examples:
The darkening sky prompted a bouleversement of the captain's order to prepare to set sail.

"In fact, [Susan Sontag] had written two novels at the beginning of her career, in the sixties. She didn't like them much, so she became a critic, indeed, the most famous and influential young critic of the sixties and seventies, a central figure in the aesthetic bouleversement of that period.…" — Joan Acocella, The New Yorker, January 10, 2005

Did you know?
English picked up bouleversement from French in the latter part of the 18th century (it ultimately traces to Middle French boule, meaning "ball," and verser, meaning "to overturn"), and while not very common, it has steadily remained in use since that time. F. Scott Fitzgerald, for one, used it in his 1920 novel This Side of Paradise: "For the second time in his life Amory had had a complete bouleversement and was hurrying into line with his generation." Both Fitzgerald's use and our first example sentence suggest the idea of turning something around, but as shown in our second example, some usage of bouleversement dispenses with this notion and instead implies a general kind of upheaval or dramatic change, as in a revolution.

Categories: Fun Stuff

December 6, 1884: Washington Monument completed

This Day in History - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1884, in Washington, D.C., workers place a nine-inch aluminum pyramid atop a tower of white marble, completing the construction of an impressive monument to the city's namesake and the nation's first president, George Washington.  As early as 1783, the infant U.S. Congress decided that a statue of George Washington, the great Revolutionary War general, should be placed near the site of the new Congressional building, wherever it might be. After then-President Washington asked him to lay out a new federal capital on the Potomac River in 1791, architect Pierre L'Enfant left a place for the statue at the western end of the sweeping National Mall (near the monument's present location).

It wasn't until 1832, however--33 years after Washington's death--that anyone really did anything about the monument. That year, a private Washington National Monument Society was formed. After holding a design competition and choosing an elaborate Greek temple-like design by architect Robert Mills, the society began a fundraising drive to raise money for the statue's construction. These efforts--including appeals to the nation's schoolchildren--raised some $230,000, far short of the $1 million needed. Construction began anyway, on July 4, 1848, as representatives of the society laid the cornerstone of the monument: a 24,500-pound block of pure white marble.

Six years later, with funds running low, construction was halted. Around the time the Civil War began in 1861, author Mark Twain described the unfinished monument as looking like a "hollow, oversized chimney." No further progress was made until 1876--the centennial of American independence--when President Ulysses S. Grant authorized construction to be completed.

Made of some 36,000 blocks of marble and granite stacked 555 feet in the air, the monument was the tallest structure in the world at the time of its completion in December 1884. In the six months following the dedication ceremony, over 10,000 people climbed the nearly 900 steps to the top of the Washington Monument. Today, an elevator makes the trip far easier, and more than 800,000 people visit the monument each year. A city law passed in 1910 restricted the height of new buildings to ensure that the monument will remain the tallest structure in Washington, D.C.--a fitting tribute to the man known as the "Father of His Country." 

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - December 5

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 8:49pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

If:

SAFE + STAY + SOON + SKIP = STOP

then:

PINK + PORE + PUSH + PLOT = ==?==

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 5 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 8:49pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 5

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 8:49pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Black Night
   Medieval tax collection!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

George Burns

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 6:00pm
"If you live to be one hundred, you've got it made. Very few people die past that age."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Samuel Johnson

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 6:00pm
"Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information on it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Gustave Flaubert

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 6:00pm
"To be stupid, selfish, and have good health are three requirements for happiness, though if stupidity is lacking, all is lost."
Categories: Fun Stuff