Fun Stuff

Sinclair Lewis

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 08/17/2015 - 7:00pm
"People will buy anything that is one to a customer."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Will Rogers

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 08/17/2015 - 7:00pm
"Our constitution protects aliens, drunks and U.S. Senators."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 08/17/2015 - 7:00pm
"He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches."
Categories: Fun Stuff

refractory

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 08/17/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 17, 2015 is:

refractory • \rih-FRAK-tuh-ree\  • adjective
1 : resisting control or authority : stubborn, unmanageable 2 : resistant to treatment or cure 3 : capable of enduring high temperatures

Examples:
"In patients with severe asthma that is refractory to standard treatment, intravenous magnesium sulfate is widely used…." — Stephen C. Lazarus, M.D., New England Journal of Medicine, August 19, 2010

"This, 2012, is Louis' moment. Rewind a couple of years and his voice was higher, his face narrower and more worried. He was connecting, but only just. Now he's expansive, authoritative, with bags of rough-edged charm. After years … of small clubs and refractory crowds, Louis has experience." — James Parker, The Atlantic, May 2012

Did you know?
Refractory is from the Latin word refractarius. During the 17th century, it was sometimes spelled as refractary, but that spelling, though more in keeping with its Latin parent, had fallen out of use by the century's end. Refractarius, like refractory, is the result of a slight variation in spelling. It stems from the Latin verb refragari, meaning "to oppose." Although refractory often describes things that are unpleasantly stubborn or resistant (such as diseases and unruly audiences), not all senses of refractory are negative. Refractory clays and bricks, for example, are capable of withstanding high temperatures.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 17, 1969: Woodstock Music Festival concludes

This Day in History - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1969, the grooviest event in music history–the Woodstock Music Festival–draws to a close after three days of peace, love and rock ‘n’ roll in upstate New York.

Conceived as “Three Days of Peace and Music,” Woodstock was a product of a partnership between John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, Artie Kornfield and Michael Lang. Their idea was to make enough money from the event to build a recording studio near the arty New York town of Woodstock. When they couldn’t find an appropriate venue in the town itself, the promoters decided to hold the festival on a 600-acre dairy farm in Bethel, New York–some 50 miles from Woodstock–owned by Max Yasgur.

By the time the weekend of the festival arrived, the group had sold a total of 186,000 tickets and expected no more than 200,000 people to show up. By Friday night, however, thousands of eager early arrivals were pushing against the entrance gates. Fearing they could not control the crowds, the promoters made the decision to open the concert to everyone, free of charge. Close to half a million people attended Woodstock, jamming the roads around Bethel with eight miles of traffic.

Soaked by rain and wallowing in the muddy mess of Yasgur’s fields, young fans best described as “hippies” euphorically took in the performances of acts like Janis Joplin, Arlo Guthrie, Joe Cocker, Joan Baez, Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Sly and the Family Stone and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. The Who performed in the early morning hours of August 17, with Roger Daltrey belting out “See Me, Feel Me,” from the now-classic album Tommy just as the sun began to rise. The most memorable moment of the concert for many fans was the closing performance by Jimi Hendrix, who gave a rambling, rocking solo guitar performance of “The Star Spangled Banner.”

With not enough bathroom facilities and first-aid tents to accommodate such a huge crowd, many described the atmosphere at the festival as chaotic. There were surprisingly few episodes of violence, though one teenager was accidentally run over and killed by a tractor and another died from a drug overdose. A number of musicians performed songs expressing their opposition to the Vietnam War, a sentiment that was enthusiastically shared by the vast majority of the audience. Later, the term “Woodstock Nation” would be used as a general term to describe the youth counterculture of the 1960s.

A 25th anniversary celebration of Woodstock took place in 1994 in Saugerties, New York. Known as Woodstock II, the concert featured Bob Dylan and Crosby, Stills and Nash as well as newer acts such as Nine Inch Nails and Green Day. Held over another rainy, muddy weekend, the event drew an estimated 300,000 people.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 7:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

A friend of yours tells you that they have hidden a 5 pound note between pages 75 and 76 of the BrainBashers Almanac.

You instantly know he is lying - why?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 16 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 7:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 7:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Hop To The Top
   Jump your way from bubble to bubble to work your way to the top.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 7:00pm
"In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts; they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Fran Lebowitz

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 7:00pm
"Remember that as a teenager you are at the last stage of your life when you will be happy to hear that the phone is for you."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Alfred North Whitehead

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 7:00pm
"The deepest definition of youth is life as yet untouched by tragedy."
Categories: Fun Stuff

E. F. Schumacher

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 7:00pm
"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction."
Categories: Fun Stuff

shill

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 16, 2015 is:

shill • \SHIL\  • verb
1 : to act as a decoy (as for a pitchman or gambler) 2 : to act as a spokesperson or promoter

Examples:
A long line of A-list actresses have shilled for the company's perfumes over the decades.

"In recent years, people who hawked ice cream or hot dogs, taught yoga or shilled other goods and services in Los Angeles parks were [legally] in the clear." — Emily Alpert Reyes, Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2015

Did you know?
Although some who shill are legitimately employed to extol the wonders of legitimate products, this was not always the case. In the first documented uses of the word shill, in the early 1900s, it was more likely that anyone hired to shill was trying to con you into parting with some cash. Practitioners were called shills (that noun also dates from the early 1900s), and they did everything from faking big wins at casinos (to promote gambling) to pretending to buy tickets (to encourage people to see certain shows). Shill is thought to be a shortened form of shillaber (an obscure noun synonymous with shill), but etymologists have found no definitive evidence of where that longer term originated.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 16, 1896: Gold discovered in the Yukon

This Day in History - Sat, 08/15/2015 - 11:00pm

While salmon fishing near the Klondike River in Canada’s Yukon Territory on this day in 1896, George Carmack reportedly spots nuggets of gold in a creek bed. His lucky discovery sparks the last great gold rush in the American West.

Hoping to cash in on reported gold strikes in Alaska, Carmack had traveled there from California in 1881. After running into a dead end, he headed north into the isolated Yukon Territory, just across the Canadian border. In 1896, another prospector, Robert Henderson, told Carmack of finding gold in a tributary of the Klondike River. Carmack headed to the region with two Native American companions, known as Skookum Jim and Tagish Charlie. On August 16, while camping near Rabbit Creek, Carmack reportedly spotted a nugget of gold jutting out from the creek bank. His two companions later agreed that Skookum Jim–Carmack’s brother-in-law–actually made the discovery.

Regardless of who spotted the gold first, the three men soon found that the rock near the creek bed was thick with gold deposits. They staked their claim the following day. News of the gold strike spread fast across Canada and the United States, and over the next two years, as many as 50,000 would-be miners arrived in the region. Rabbit Creek was renamed Bonanza, and even more gold was discovered in another Klondike tributary, dubbed Eldorado.

“Klondike Fever” reached its height in the United States in mid-July 1897 when two steamships arrived from the Yukon in San Francisco and Seattle, bringing a total of more than two tons of gold. Thousands of eager young men bought elaborate “Yukon outfits” (kits assembled by clever marketers containing food, clothing, tools and other necessary equipment) and set out on their way north. Few of these would find what they were looking for, as most of the land in the region had already been claimed. One of the unsuccessful gold-seekers was 21-year-old Jack London, whose short stories based on his Klondike experience became his first book, The Son of the Wolf (1900).

For his part, Carmack became rich off his discovery, leaving the Yukon with $1 million worth of gold. Many individual gold miners in the Klondike eventually sold their stakes to mining companies, who had the resources and machinery to access more gold. Large-scale gold mining in the Yukon Territory didn’t end until 1966, and by that time the region had yielded some $250 million in gold. Today, some 200 small gold mines still operate in the region.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 15

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/15/2015 - 7:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What four digit number has digit 2 smaller than digit 4 which is two thirds of digit 1 which is two thirds of digit 3 which is three times digit 2?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 15 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/15/2015 - 7:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 15

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/15/2015 - 7:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Balance
   Grab your racket and head to the courts. How long can you balance the tennis racket?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Norm Papernick

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/15/2015 - 7:00pm
"Those who can laugh without cause have either found the true meaning of happiness or have gone stark raving mad."
Categories: Fun Stuff

John Lennon

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/15/2015 - 7:00pm
"Would those of you in the cheaper seats clap your hands? And the rest of you, if you'll just rattle your jewelry."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Tom Robbins

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/15/2015 - 7:00pm
"Humanity has advanced, when it has advanced, not because it has been sober, responsible, and cautious, but because it has been playful, rebellious, and immature."
Categories: Fun Stuff