Fun Stuff

George Burns

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"You know you're getting old when you stoop to tie your shoelaces and wonder what else you could do while you're down there."
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George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"Hell is full of musical amateurs."
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Robert Frost

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"Love is an irresistible desire to be irresistibly desired."
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Will Cuppy

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 7:00pm
"Aristotle was famous for knowing everything. He taught that the brain exists merely to cool the blood and is not involved in the process of thinking. This is true only of certain persons."
Categories: Fun Stuff

belated

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 23, 2015 is:

belated • \bih-LAY-tud\  • adjective
1 : delayed beyond the usual time 2 : existing or appearing past the normal or proper time

Examples:
Susan called Jim to let him know that a belated birthday gift from her was on its way.

"Friends and neighbors of the state Capitol complex joined Lt. Gov. Angela McLean Friday in a belated Earth Day celebration, planting trees and dedicating a new garden space across from the Capitol." — Independent Record (Montana), May 1, 2015

Did you know?
Long ago, there was a verb belate, which meant "to make late." From the beginning, belate tended to mostly turn up in the form of its past participle belated. Eventually, belate itself fell out of use, leaving behind belated as an adjective that preserved the original notion of delay. As you may have guessed, belate and its descendant belated derive from the adjective late; belate was formed by simply combining the prefix be- ("to cause to be") with late. Belated was also once used in the sense "overtaken by night," as in "belated travelers seeking lodging for the night." This sense was in fact the first meaning of the adjective but it too fell out of use.

Categories: Fun Stuff

roustabout

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 22, 2015 is:

roustabout • \ROWSS-tuh-bowt\  • noun
1 a : deckhand b : a person who loads and unloads ships at a seaport 2 : an unskilled or semiskilled laborer especially in an oil field or refinery 3 : a circus worker who erects and dismantles tents, cares for the grounds, and handles animals and equipment 4 : a person with no permanent home or regular occupation; also : one who stirs up trouble

Examples:
Nathan worked for years as a roustabout in the oil fields of Alaska until he earned enough money to go to college and become a petroleum engineer.

"The Copenhagen-based Berdino family, led by patriarch Benny Berdino, own the Arena Cirkus, a troupe that started out with just one trailer and now stretches to several, with dozens of performers, animals, and roustabouts working on the payroll." — Leslie Felperin, Hollywood Reporter, April 27, 2015

Did you know?
Circus roustabouts (who erect and dismantle tents, care for the grounds, and handle animals and equipment) are commonly associated with circus animals, of course, but they also have a connection with game birds, at least in terms of etymology. Roustabout comes from roust, which is an alteration of rouse, a verb from Middle English that originally meant "to shake the feathers" (as in the way a bird might ruffle its feathers or shake its plumage when it is settling down or grooming itself). Rouse, which today is a synonym of awaken, also formerly meant "to cause to break from cover," a sense that may have influenced the modern meaning of roust: "to drive (as from bed) roughly or unceremoniously."

Categories: Fun Stuff