Around Cook County

News and other information from Cook County

"Impressionistic Watercolors" Course Offered At Art Colony

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 2:54pm

An "Impressionistic Watercolors" course will be offered at the Grand Marais Art Colony on May 5, 6 and 7.  The course will be taught by Andy Evansen of Vermillion, Minnesota, who has traveled and painted in many places around the world, including an Art Colony trip to Isle Royale.  WTIP's Veronica Weadock spoke with Andy to learn more. 
 

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Easter fun north of the border at Gammondale Farms

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 2:27pm
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Gammondale Farms invites the public to a special springtime event on Saturday, April 19. The farm, about 20 miles north of the U.S. - Canadian border, is hosting an Easter Festival and Egg Hunt from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

In addition to an egg hunt there will be draft horse rides, face painting, a bake sale and snacks, duck races, a tire swing and a chance to see farm animals—including bunnies, of course!

The cost is $10 per child and includes some Easter “loot.”

For directions or more information, call (807) 475-5615 or visit www.gammondalefarm.com. 

Spring brings music to North Shore Care Center

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 2:23pm

Music abounds at the North Shore Care Center this spring. The Grand Marais Lioness Club will host their monthly social for residents with special desserts on Saturday, April 19 at 3 p.m., along with favorite piano tunes by Irene Thompson.

Additional live music in April will include Myron Bursheim on Sundays, Irene Thompson on Mondays, Al Fuller on Tuesdays, and Susan Scherer on Wednesdays. The classic country band Portage will perform for a dance on April 26 at 6:30 p.m. Families, friends, and community members are always welcome to attend.

There are volunteer opportunities for all ages at North Shore Care Center. For more information about activity programs or volunteer opportunities, please contact the Activity Department at 218.387.3518 or visit the website: www.nshorehospital.com. 

Cook County to host 25th Emergency Services Conference

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 6:02pm

For 25 years, Cook County has been hosting an emergency services conference in Grand Marais on the last weekend of April. For 25 years, First Responders, firefighters, sheriff deputies, law enforcement dispatchers, Border Patrol agents, EMTs and other medical workers, members of search and rescue and others involved in emergency situations have gathered to learn from one another. Emergency workers from around the region and across the border have participated. They will be gathering once again this year for the 2014 Cook County Emergency Services Conference on April 25- 26.

 Conference Coordinator, Emergency Management Director Jim Wiinanen issued the invitation to this year’s conference, stating, “With most Cook County responder entities migrating to ARMER in the last year to six months, we felt it appropriate to focus on communications. ‘If communications is the key, what does it unlock?’” asked Wiinanen.

 All of the conference information us available online at http://www.co.cook.mn.us/extension/index.php/2014-registration. Anyone with questions may call Wiinanen at (218) 387-3059.

 EMS Director Wiinanen encouraged emergency workers to register soon to help with planning.  A $10 suggested registration is payable at the door when you sign in at the conference.

 Wiinanen added, “ Twenty-five years of Emergency Services Conferences may be a milestone.  But that pales compared to the evolution of emergency service in the county.  I hear that the first ambulance in the county came in 1948 and if you attend the conference you will learn about that vehicle and the changes in emergency service through the years.”

Great Decisions Discussion Group: Food and Climate

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 1:51pm

“Food and Climate” will be the topic at this month’s Great Decisions Discussion Group, scheduled for Thursday, April 17 from noon to 1:30 pm at the Cook County Community Center, 317 West 5th Street, Grand Marais.  Eric and Virginia Reiner will lead the discussion dealing with the global political concerns of climate change and food security.  WTIP's Mark Abrahamson spoke with Eric and Virginia to learn more.  
  
 

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Hedstrom Lumber to serve as test site for MDA gypsy moth program

Mon, 04/14/2014 - 12:01pm

Howard Hedstrom, president of Hedstrom Lumber Company, came before the Cook County commissioners on April 8, 2014 to give them an update on the coming gypsy moth quarantine to be imposed by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) on Cook and Lake counties beginning May 1, and he had some good news.

“The forest service industry has negotiated a new agreement [with the MDA] with how we transport wood and how we store wood,” Hedstrom said.

“With the old agreements, we would be severely hurt, but the MDA is putting together new [compliance] agreements. They have loosened up and made compliance agreements that are acceptable to store and utilize raw materials and won’t be a deterrent to us,” Hedstrom said.

Wood shipped into Hedstrom Lumber from outstate will be covered by the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service  (APHIS), and haulers will have to get training and certification to haul the wood, said Hedstrom.

One issue that is still being worked out is if it will be safe for Hedstrom Lumber to ship bark to the Twin Cities.

“In our business, we don’t burn all of the bark we produce. In the summer we separate it and ship the bark as a landscape product. They [MDA] deem bark as a problem because they don’t want to ship egg masses to a non-quarantine area.

“But we strip the bark and put it through a hammer mill and we think that will take care of the problem,” said Hedstrom.

The MDA will use Hedstrom Lumber mill as a test site to see if the bark carries any gypsy moth eggs after going through the mill’s processing. “They have the capability of bringing in moths that lay egg masses and they will check them. I’m not sure if they are looking for zero risk or a diminished risk, but I think they are looking for a greatly reduced risk,” said Hedstrom.