Around Cook County

News and other information from Cook County

High waves could hit eastern Lake Superior

Mon, 10/29/2012 - 1:41pm

Severe weather bearing down on the Eastern Seaboard could lead to waves as high as 33 feet on parts of Lake Michigan and dangerous conditions on other Great Lakes.

The National Weather Service has issued Great Lakes gale and storm warnings in effect through Wednesday, Oct. 31. It says waves on Lake Michigan could be 10 to 18 feet by Monday afternoon and then build to 20 to 33 feet on Tuesday before subsiding.

The Weather Service in Duluth said waves on eastern Lake Superior Tuesday could top 20 feet.

Dangerous conditions are expected along piers and breakwalls in areas including southwestern Michigan. Snow linked to the storm could fall in parts of Michigan. The Port of Milwaukee is taking steps to protect its docks and boats.

 

Cook County Whole Foods Co-op to hold annual meeting Tuesday

Mon, 10/29/2012 - 12:23pm

Cook County Whole Foods Co-op will be holding its Owners’ Annual Meeting on Tuesday, October 30, 2012, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. at North House Folk School, in the Blue Building. 
The public is invited to gather at 6 p.m. before the meeting for an owner potluck dinner. The Co-op will provide grilled bison burgers, veggie burgers, hot dogs, condiments, beverages, seasonal beer and table service items. They ask attendees to please bring a side dish or dessert to share. Please include a list of ingredients with your dish.
The annual meeting will include a presentation by guest speaker C.E. Pugh, Chief Operating Officer, National Cooperative Grocers Association (NCGA). Also included will be reports by the Co-op General Manager, Jennifer Stoltz and Co-op Board President, Erik Hahn.
For more information about the Cook County Whole Foods Co-op, visit www.cookcounty.coop.

County economy is focus of October Business Luncheon

Mon, 10/29/2012 - 11:44am

Randy Lasky of Northspan Group, a Duluth nonprofit that focuses on economic development, and Josh Bergstad of the Arrowhead Regional Development Commission have spent a great deal of time in recent months focusing on the Cook County economy. At Cook County Higher Ed's October Business Networking Luncheon, Lasky and Bergstad will talk about what they have learned thus far. Their topic: The Cook County economy: It's not in great shape, and why that matters.
Lasky and Bergstad have focused on Cook County as part of their work guiding the Cook County Go Team, a group of county residents working to create an economic development action plan that can aid the county board, the Cook County – Grand Marais Economic Development Authority and others as they work to make the county stronger.
The Go Team includes 22 people from all sectors and all parts of the county. Their project is called Go Cook County: Creating Sustainable Development For All. Their work is financed by the city of Grand Marais, the EDA, the Cook County Board, Arrowhead Electric Cooperative, Inc., and others.
The Lasky/Bergstad luncheon will run from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 31 at Cook County Higher Ed's North Shore Campus, 300 W. Third St., Grand Marais. The luncheon will be catered by Cascade Lodge. To reserve a place at this luncheon, please email highered@northshorecampus.org or call 387-3411. Cost of the luncheon is $20, of which $15 pays for the lunch and $5 will enable Higher Ed to make a video of the event that can be made available to the community at a later date.

Bands close lands to wolf hunt

Mon, 10/29/2012 - 6:32am
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The Grand Portage band of Lake Superior Chippewa and the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa say that tribal lands on the reservations at Grand Portage, Nett Lake, and Lake Vermilion will be closed to wolf hunting during the upcoming state season.

The Minnesota Supreme Court on Friday rejected an effort to block the state’s wolf hunting season from opening along with deer season this Saturday.

The Duluth News-Tribune quotes Tribal officials as saying, “The Tribal Councils determined that hunting wolves for sport is inconsistent with a tradition of subsistence hunting and that for some members hunting wolves presented conflicts with cultural practices.”

The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and the 1854 Treaty Authority manages off-reservation hunting, fishing and gathering rights in the ceded territory for the Grand Portage and Bois Forte bands. They already announced they would not authorize wolf hunting for band members this fall.

The Fond du Lac Band asked the Minnesota DNR not to allow state wolf hunters to use public lands within the exterior boundary of the reservation. The DNR did not agree to that request, tribal officials said.

In its decision last Friday, the high court made no comment in denying an emergency motion by the Center for Biological Diversity and Howling for Wolves to stop the upcoming wolf hunting and trapping seasons. The seasons will be Minnesota’s first since the region’s wolves came off the endangered list last January.

The Minnesota Court of Appeals earlier had refused to issue an injunction, and any trial for the groups’ lawsuit probably will take place after the upcoming season is over.

While the request for an injunction was denied, an attorney for the two groups noted that the groups’ lawsuit will continue. Howling for Wolves and the Center for Biological Diversity claim that the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources failed to provide a formal opportunity for public comments before issuing its regulations for the upcoming season.

Instead of offering a formal public comment period, the DNR offered an online survey before adopting the details of how wolves would be shot and trapped. More than 75 percent of the comments opposed killing wolves.

The DNR says has it followed all necessary steps to establish the season. In court filings, the agency contended that it received extensive public comments that resulted in substantive changes to the final rules for the wolf hunt and that it acted within its legal authority for conducting expedited rulemaking.

Minnesota’s wolf hunting season will start Nov. 3, with a late hunting and trapping season starting Nov. 24. The DNR has set a target harvest of 200 wolves for each of the two seasons for a total of 400 animals. Minnesota has an estimated 3,000 wolves.

Trick-or-Treaters invited to Care Center on Halloween

Sun, 10/28/2012 - 7:24pm

Everyone at the North Shore Care Center looks forward to 
filling treat bags for kids to enjoy on Halloween at the Community 
Center and at the Care Center. The residents will give out candy to
trick-or-treaters on Halloween night, October 31 from 5 - 7 p.m., so
put that stop on your trick-or-treating list!
There are volunteer opportunities for all ages at the North Shore Care 
Center. For more information please contact the Activity Department at 
(218) 387-3518 or visit our website www.nshorehospital.com.
 
 

Fun Halloween events coming soon

Sat, 10/27/2012 - 10:25am
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Boo! Several traditional Cook County events are coming up soon. On the West End, the annual Birch Grove PTO Halloween Carnival will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 28 at the Birch Grove Community 
Center in Tofte. It will feature bingo, kids games, a cakewalk, haunted house, raffles and tons of fun.
Organizer Diane Blanchette said, “Wear a costume (or not) and bring the whole family!”

The Cook County Community Center will host a party including treats, crafts and games, cakewalk and a food drive contest on Wednesday, Oct. 31 from 3:45 to 7 p.m. The costume contest for all ages is at 5:30 p.m.
To donate a cake, cookies, or sweet treats, contact Diane at (218) 387-3015.
The event is sponsored by Community Education, the Cook County  Community Center/Extension and Cook County Kids Plus.

And rounding out the Halloween activities is the second annual Haunted House at 121 West Third Street in Grand Marais from 5 - 8 p.m. on October 29 - 31. Community members are invited to tour the new and 
expanded haunted house.
There is no charge for the haunted house, but visitors are asked to bring a non-perishable food item if possible.