Around Cook County

News and other information from Cook County

8th District debate features environment and BWCAW

Wed, 10/17/2012 - 6:32am
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CAMBRIDGE, Minn. (AP) - Republican Congressman Chip Cravaack and DFL challenger Rick Nolan are at odds over the best ways to create jobs and provide health care in their latest 8th District debate.
 
Cravaack and Nolan debated for a third time yesterday before an overflow crowd at Anoka Ramsey Community College in Cambridge.

On environmental issues, Nolan said environmentalists are not hurting economic development in Northeastern Minnesota. Cravaack criticized Nolan for opposing logging, snowmobiling and motor-boating when he voted to create the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wildness in the late 1970s.

Cravaack said “Congressman Nolan sided essentially with the Twin City environmentalists and was actually in opposition of pro-growth, pro-economic reforms that we needed in the Northland to create jobs.”

Nolan said he remains proud of his BWCAW vote, which he suggested has created tourism jobs in the district. “It’s one of the 10 best destination-oriented vacations in the entire world,” he said. “People fly in from all over America, all over the world to take advantage of that great experience.”

Outside groups have spent nearly $4.5 million on the race in the 8th District, a key seat as the parties fight for control of the House.

Cravaack and Nolan will meet for their fourth and final debate Oct. 31 in Virginia.

Doo-Wop Wed Widing Hood hoppin' and boppin' in rehearsals

Tue, 10/16/2012 - 11:51am

The Grand Marais Playhouse is rehearsing for Doo-Wop Wed Widing Hood, a 1950s take on the classic fairy tale. The cast has students from grade one to adults. It’s very funny and for adults there are memorable references to the ‘50s in music, song and TV shows! This zany adventure is guaranteed to end in happily-ever-after laughter for audiences and performers of all ages!
Performances are November 3, 4 10, and 11 on Saturdays at 7 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. November 4 is admission is “donation at the door”—pay what you can.
For the Opening Night performance on the first Saturday, bring five or more items or make a $10 donation for the food shelf and get one ticket free when you buy another.

There's a huge cast list in this whimsical production! The are: 

Mrs. Hood    Lucy Callender
Mr. Hood    Cedric Rock
Little Red Riding Hood   Hazel Oberholtzer
Narrator #1    Sam Kern
Narrator #2    Amelia Roth
Medium Purple Riding Hood  Aurora Schelmeske
Big Green Riding Hood  Jaymie Kirk
King     Andy Kern
Queen     Alyssa Fenstad-Lashinski
Wise Prince Jason   Luke Johnson
Strong Prince Justin   Leif Anderson
Loud Prince Frank    Sam Sietsema
Sophie     Bianca Zimmer
Emma     Louise Ramberg
Fairy Godmother    Dianne Stoddard
Grandmother     Janet Healy
Louise the UPS Girl   Sylvia Berka
Evil Queen     Leah Carpenter
Big Bad Wolf    Gary Nesgoda
Gerlad     Dominic Wilson
Oswald    Ryan Bilben

Sea Grant gets help with invasive species

Tue, 10/16/2012 - 9:17am
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Efforts by Minnesota Sea Grant to spread the word to stop the spread of aquatic invasive species have received a big lift — a $400,000 grant from the federal Great lakes Restoration Initiative.

The grant, through the Environmental Protection Agency, will allow Sea Grant to continue education efforts across the Great Lakes region aimed at slowing the spread of invasive species like zebra mussels, ruffe and goby by focusing on boaters and anglers who carry species from one lake to another.

The efforts also extend to lesser-known invasive species such as aquarium fish, by encouraging owners not to throw their unwanted fish into lakes or streams.

In the past, education efforts have included billboards, media ads, floating key chains with messages and poster contests among many outreach efforts. The effort this year is expanding to marketplace issues, such as the sale of live invasive fish at markets in Wisconsin and to youth groups in Illinois.

Wolf hunting: Legal actions grow, license sales slow

Tue, 10/16/2012 - 6:32am
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MINNEAPOLIS— Two state conservation groups yesterday asked the Minnesota Supreme Court to stop wolf hunting and trapping this fall. Two national groups are also seeking legal protection for wolves, and in the meantime the purchase of hunting licenses is moving slowly.

The Center for Biological Diversity and Howling for Wolves seek review of a Minnesota Court of Appeals’ decision issued last week that denied their motion for a preliminary injunction.
 
Unless the decision of the Court of Appeals is reversed by the Minnesota Supreme Court, wolf hunting and trapping will begin Nov. 3 with the opening of the deer firearms season. The groups claim that without a preliminary injunction, the wolf seasons will be over before the appellate court considers the merits of their legal challenge claiming the state failed to take formal public comment on the hunt.

Wisconsin’s wolf hunt started Monday, although court action there has stopped or at least delayed the use of hounds for wolf hunting.

Meanwhile, The Humane Society of the United States and The Fund for Animals signaled yesterday that they will file suit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in an effort to return the Great Lakes wolf to the endangered species list. The groups are also asking that Wisconsin and Minnesota halt their wolf hunts.

Amid all the legal actions, Minnesota's prospective wolf hunters are taking their time buying their licenses.
Six-thousand hunters were selected in the lottery for the right to buy licenses for Minnesota's first wolf season. But as of Monday, the Department of Natural Resources had sold 1,155 of the 3,600 available early season licenses.

Hunters selected for the early wolf hunting season must buy their licenses by Wednesday, Oct. 24. Lottery winners for the late hunting-and-trapping season, which opens Nov. 24, must buy their licenses by Nov. 15. The DNR says it has sold 305 of the 1,800 late season hunting licenses and 166 of the 600 available trapping licenses.

Licenses that remain unsold by the deadlines will become available to other hunters.

Minnesota Supreme Court asked to stop wolf season

Mon, 10/15/2012 - 12:02pm
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MINNEAPOLIS— The Center for Biological Diversity and Howling for Wolves today asked the Minnesota Supreme Court to stop wolf hunting and trapping this fall.

The conservation groups seek review of a Minnesota Court of Appeals’ decision issued last week that denied their motion for a preliminary injunction.
 
Unless the decision of the Court of Appeals is reversed by the Minnesota Supreme Court, wolf hunting and trapping will begin Nov. 3 with the opening of the deer firearms season. The conservation groups’ lawsuit is still pending, with a final ruling expected early next year.

They claim that without a preliminary injunction, the wolf trapping and hunting season will be over before the appellate court considers the merits of the conservation groups’ legal challenge claiming the state failed to take formal public comment on the hunt.

Great Decisions focuses on Energy Geopolitics

Mon, 10/15/2012 - 9:16am

The Great Decisions discussion group usually meets on the third Thursday each month. All are invited to attend. On October 18 at the Grand Marais Community Center, Hyla Napadensky will be leading the Great Decisions discussion of Energy Geopolitics. Great Decisions, an annual publication of Foreign Policy Association, Inc. that provides informative briefings of the discussion topics. It can be purchased or it can be checked out at the Grand Marais library.