Around Cook County

News and other information from Cook County

Leaders sought for Cook County Republican Party

Wed, 02/27/2013 - 11:21am

Only 11 people battled the sub zero weather and wind to attend the 2013 Republican Party’s Cook County Convention held February 19 at 7 p.m. at the Cook County Senior Center, but they were a determined lot, dedicated to bringing their party’s principles back to prominence in the county.
Garry Gamble chaired the event, but said this would his last time leading the party. He also said his co-chair, Mark Breitsprecher, wasn’t interested in continuing his position, either.
“I don’t want a perception of a conflict of interest,” said Gamble, who was elected to the county board as a county commissioner last fall.
“Our culture is so polarized that I would be more unencumbered by giving up my role as co-chair. But stepping down doesn’t mean stepping away from what I believe in,” Gamble said.
As for Breitsprecher, he is busy with his ancient coin business and looking to move from Cook County if the opportunity presents itself.
Just who will serve in the role as chair or will co-chair the party is up for grabs, because no one at the meeting was ready to assume that mantle of leadership. Gamble said he would investigate party rules to see how long the local BPOU (Basic Political Operating Unit) had before calling a special meeting and electing someone to chair the party.
As for the other positions, Mary Petz was reelected secretary and Jim Hall treasurer. Hall has worked for the party since the mid 1950s and he was commended for his service.
With the party somewhat in tatters due to the recent presidential election, Gamble said its members must remain true to their roots.

Barbara Jean and Chastity Brown in concert at ACA Saturday

Wed, 02/27/2013 - 11:20am

Join the North Shore Music Association March 2 for a shared bill of two exceptionally talented Minnesota musicians, Barbara Jean and Chastity Brown.
Calling the North Shore home until recently, Barbara Jean has developed her craft through constant live performance and has recently struck out on her own to take her debut record, The Great Escape to fans all across the Midwest. Classically trained on the viola at the U of M, and self-taught at the banjo, her voice and songs transcend tradition with a mix of Americana, Appalachia, and an insightful vulnerability in lyric and delivery. Performing solo, as a duo, or in larger ensembles, she brings a grace and comfort to the stage at once disarming and captivating, gaining her a burgeoning audience and high praise from her peers.
Throw all the genres and hyphenates together you want to describe Chastity Brown— gospel, roots and soul, jazz, blues and country – they are all right, and also not enough to describe this talented musician. She channels songs that are borne deep in the American bone, the hunger, desperation and confidence that runs through our times.  Coming from Tennessee to Minnesota, she now tours the country and has recently released her fourth full-length record, Back-Road Highways.
Tickets for the 7:30 p.m. concert  at the Arrowhead Center for the Arts are $10 adults, $5 ages 18 and under. Tickets are available in advance at www.tix.com, or night of performance at the door.  General seating.  Lobby opens at 6:30 pm.

MPCA hosting wild rice standards study open house

Wed, 02/27/2013 - 8:15am

WEST ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The Minnesota Pollution Control agency will host an open house Thursday to provide an update on its long-term study on whether the state should revise its water quality standard for protecting wild rice beds.

The MPCA says the open house will include an overview of the study followed by a poster session. Posters will focus on current and future research projects, the standards setting process and study timeline, and about the current sulfate limits to protect wild rice.

Mining interests and wastewater treatment plant operators have sought to loosen the sulfate standard.
Those attending the session will have an opportunity to provide input on the work.

"Seen Through Native Eyes: A Celebration of Native Art" film screening Thursday

Tue, 02/26/2013 - 11:24am

“Seen Through Native Eyes: A Celebration of Native Art” is being brought to the community by a collaboration between the Art Colony and Spirit of the Wilderness Episcopal Church. Mary Ellen Ashcroft, vicar of Spirit of the Wilderness explains the purpose of the exhibit. She said, “We hope to delve deeply and begin to see (at least realize what we can’t see) through native eyes, both to broaden our artistic vision, but also to deepen our understanding. In this year of the 150th anniversary of the massacre of 38 Dakota warriors, we felt it appropriate to stop and consider from a different perspective.”
In addition to a Friday night reception for featured artists Robert Two Bulls and Johnson Loud, the event now includes a screening of the movie 38+2, which commemorates the anniversary of the 38 Dakota people hanged 150 years ago—and the story of the modern day recreation of their tragic journey. The film will be shown at Cook County Higher Education at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 28. There will be discussion with Two Bulls and Loud afterwards and refreshments will be served.
In addition to the film and exhibit at the Art Colony, Two Bulls (Pine Ridge Oglala Lakota) and Loud (Red Lake, Chippewa) will conduct workshops on March 2, from 9 – 4 p.m. at the Grand Marais Art Colony. The workshops are open to ages 10 and up. From 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. there will be a presentation and discussion of Native Art. From 12   4 p.m. the artists will demonstrate their art form. Two Bulls will give an interactive presentation on oil painting. Loud will demonstrate the creation of his pottery.
The cost of the workshops is $50, with an additional $15 for supplies for the Robert Two Bulls class. Scholarships are available. For more information or to register, contact the Grand Marais Art Colony at (218) 387-2737.

City council considers community connection for Rec. Park

Tue, 02/26/2013 - 11:06am
Walkway

At the Grand Marais city council meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 13, councilor and park board member Bill Lenz presented two drawings of proposed footbridges for the new trail to the lake in the Rec Park. One is a covered bridge, while the other is of the more traditional uncovered variety. The cost of each is about the same ($10,000) despite the addition of a roof. City Clerk Mike Roth explained the reason for that: One requires more materials that cost less; the other requires fewer materials that cost more.
Lenz said he and the park board would like to hear comments from the public about which design they prefer, and encouraged input to the park office before the park board makes its decision next month. (More detailed artist’s renderings of the designs are available at the Rec Park—and we’ll have one configuration in the News-Herald this week.
The bridge is part of the Community Connections project that will lead pedestrians from the highway into the northeast section of the park next to North House Folk School.

Come check out the fun of Zumba at Birch Grove Feb. 27

Mon, 02/25/2013 - 1:15pm

Zumba comes to the West End! To help everyone get moving during the cold month of February, there will be a Zumba Gold demonstration with Chris Angelo at 10:30 a.m. on February 27.
Everyone is invited to join the fun!